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Discussion Starter #401

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Originally Posted by just jim  /t/1442340/the-stonewater-cinema-build-thread/390#post_23118346


Re your lights in post 64


Look for antique heating grills and grates at antique shops, wreckers, architectural salvagers...Ebay. There were some very beautiful grills that you might be able to incorporate in your back lit lighting.


If you can find a glass artist with a kiln, the art glass can be "slumped" to fit a curve. If you can find one of the starving ones it might not be toooo much!


EDIT: I guess you thought about these sources, as I see in later posts...

Yes, the problem was that nothing would fit to size...or I couldn't get enough of them....or they were far too expensive.....or refinishing them was far too expensive....*SIGH*


So I have completely scrapped the idea of looking for authentic metalwork and am having metalwork produced in the Art Deco theme. I haven't made any posts in a few weeks (shame on me), but I have been working diligently in the background on more aspects of the theater, primarily the aesthetic design which I really have to get buttoned up so fabrication work can be contracted. As of now I have an original Art Deco design that I sketched being put into CAD by a local guy looking to pocket a few extra bucks. Once the metal insert is complete I am sending him a second sketch to actually lay out the whole column from my original art. This will help me with getting a handle on the different design choices I have in my head, especially since it can easily be translated into a 3D rendering. I'm sure it won't be anywhere near Mario's awesome renderings in his Cinemar thread, but it will give me and everybody else a good idea of where I am headed. Posts to follow on this within the next week or two.
 

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Discussion Starter #402

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Originally Posted by just jim  /t/1442340/the-stonewater-cinema-build-thread/390#post_23123096


I don't know where your steps are to get on to the riser. Assuming they are against the wall, your base and chair rail should follow the slope of the 2 steps. This will maintain the chair rail at your chosen height onto the riser. If you keep the rail straight through, it will look like you had a room and later threw in the riser. If you can work in a "stringer"on the wall, even if it is not functional and merely cut to the steps, it will make it easier to fit the base boards.

Thanks for the information and the links. Having the chair rail at a consistent height around the room is an aesthetic decision, but having the height the chair rail is installed is a performance decision since it affects the height of the acoustic panels in relation to ear height. I am also not putting the chair rail around the columns because of the large backlit alabaster panel (and metalwork) I plan to install. I'll have to look at the transition around the one step when I come to it, but I will figure something out. Your pictures are not unlike what is in my own house, fyi.


The steps will be self-standing and mounted against the riser base. Most of the riser will be carpeted, but as of now I plan to have two treads made from Solid African Mahogany and stained to match the rest of my African Mahogany finish work. I may change my mind and just go with carpet. As of now I do not plan any bullnose out of wood, just made from plywood and carpeted.


Make sense? Thanks again for chiming in.
 

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That's some good information posted Tim. I've gone the opposite direction and am going to have my chair rail/wainscoting at 30" relative to the floor all the way around. So it will be 30" high above the main level and 30" high above the riser as well. For me, the determining factor was the wet bar at the back. I thought it would look funny with low chair rail running into a full height counter.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG  /t/1442340/the-stonewater-cinema-build-thread/390#post_23123364


The proper size is 8" for the amount of return that I actually need. 10" is as big as I could fit through the space I have to work with. Perhaps a 12" rigid would fit, but it would have to be squished. I don't have this pictured yet, but the duct rises vertically off my HVAC unit about 8 feet, goes through a rigid 90 and then travels 8 feet into the room before hitting another rigid 90 and into a lined 14x14 return air box. The original size of the return air box was 10x10 for an 8" flex pipe, so you can see both the size of the flex and return duct were oversized to distribute the same amount of air flow over a wider surface area. Unfortunately since everything is still so open, I can't tell what the final result will be. I can say that it is tough to hear any air turbulence, even with putting my ear right by the return air grate.

Not that I am aware of. Just a lot of reading through different threads should help. Thanks again for your post.


OK, so if the proper size is 8", then you would convert to a lined 10". The point being that you step up 2" because you lose 2" with the rigid fiberglass lining. Inside you still have 8". But while the thing is open this would be when to change. The lined pipe, and you need at least 3' not just the box, acts as a sound attenuator. I would go to the elbow. This is from the engineering specs from a job I did and what Space Pac does with their A/C installs. I gather you were over-sizing the end section to slow down the air. The liner will also help with mechanical noise coming in and movie sound going out.


I always find the differences in building code interesting. Here, horizontal drains are 1/4" per foot and 1/8" under the basement floor to the street.


In Toronto we have a place called The Door Store that manages to get large quantities of stuff from tear downs and Sam also imports shipping containers from Europe full of amazing architectural details. I was trying to match my 1907 cast bronze door knobs. He said he'd seen them before and pulled out 6 complete sets. Incidentally, soaking metal work, such as your EXIT sign in methyl hydrate over night softens paint, so that you can take most of it off with a toothbrush. And it doesn't eat at defects in the plating like strippers can. Just keep it wet or it hardens very quickly as it dries. I think the white lettering is fired into the glass.


If you were closer, my welder loves making things like your grills at ridiculously fair prices, about 30% less according to his other clients that shop around.


With the base, I would suggest a full miter and have a section running vertical, against the riser and then miter back to horizontal on the riser. Leave it 1/2" off the floor and riser to tuck the carpet underneath.


No nosing where? It makes a nice finishing detail on the top edge of the riser, whether you carpet it or not, If you aren't carpeting the front of the riser, you can finish the carpet by tucking it under the nosing and stapling it. It is actually required by code on the stair tread, unless the stair riser slopes back 1". Either way the front edge of the tread must be 1" out over the back of the tread/floor below. Including the riser deck. Otherwise you will trip/kick the riser walking up.


The chair rail would be coped into the side of the pilaster.


I hope your foot is healing nicely and you ARE keeping up with the therapy!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG  /t/1442340/the-stonewater-cinema-build-thread/300#post_22923657


As of right now I am planning for a single layer of 7/16" OSB and a single layer of 5/8" Drywall with Green Glue for the walls and ceiling. The OSB is so I can literally attach my finish carpentry anywhere and still reach some structure. I might consider adding a second layer of 5/8" drywall and Green Glue, but I am just not sure yet. I really want to add the mass, so I might give up the convenience of secure attachment of any screw or nail anywhere and just do the two layers of 5/8" drywall with Green Glue in between. 7/16" OSB is 1.4 pounds per square foot whereas 5/8" drywall is 2.31 pounds per square foot. Comparing the two assemblies at 3.71 pounds per square foot vs. 4.62 pounds per square foot, the second assembly has 24.5% more mass than the first. That's a big difference but I am not sure how meaningful that is in terms of noise containment? Is it 25% less??? Not likely, but surely some percentage less. I still have some thinking to do on this point.

If it is mass you want, there are much heavier DW's than your basic 5/8" gypsum board. Here is a conversation I sent to someone else...


"The "DW" I was talking about was called VHI and came in 1/2" and 5/8". CGC seems to have combined it with their water resistant variety; probably because I don't think either was a big seller. So now it is Aqua-tough VHI. It weighs 2.4/3.1 lbs/SF for 1/2" / 5/8", compared to 1.7/2.1 for standard DW. So, about 50% more! http://www.cgcinc.com/media/299868/4117_fiberock%20abuse-resistant%20panels-ss-3-hr.pdf "


It claims to snap easily with a knife cut. RIGHT! It is VERY hard. They gave me a cordless Makita low RPM circular saw with my 1st order to promote the product. The dust is wicked...wear a mask or have a shop vac sucking the dust!!! Or both.


The finish coating is called Tough Hide. http://www.cgcinc.com/en/products/paint-and-primer/sheetrock%C2%AE-tuff-hide%E2%84%A2-primer-surfacer-.aspx?pType=PRO The last time I needed it CDS sold me a different brand that was quite a bit cheaper...I think it was Westrock's version. Seemed to work the same. It was so thick on the wall that we were sure it was going to run. It didn't and the orange peel flattened out. The Westrock stuff says that you can use an airless sprayer or roller. CGC says Airless sprayer. We only have sprayed it.


I believe it also comes in 1", but that is just silly. It gets used for walls in prisons.


I installed 12' x 1/2" sheets on my cathedral ceiling which is insulated by 1/2 lb foam and has a slate roof. Sound does not come through! I installed the the 5/8" version in my new addition. The 12' sheets are very heavy to put on the 9' 6" ceiling, or so my DW guys tell me.



The spray coat goes over the finished DW to give a level 5 finish. It is very abrasive resistant and smooth like plaster.


This stuff is available through commercial DW suppliers.


PS It only costs "more money"!
 

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Discussion Starter #406

Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim  /t/1442340/the-stonewater-cinema-build-thread/390#post_23125630


OK, so if the proper size is 8", then you would convert to a lined 10". The point being that you step up 2" because you lose 2" with the rigid fiberglass lining. Inside you still have 8". But while the thing is open this would be when to change. The lined pipe, and you need at least 3' not just the box, acts as a sound attenuator. I would go to the elbow. This is from the engineering specs from a job I did and what Space Pac does with their A/C installs. I gather you were over-sizing the end section to slow down the air. The liner will also help with mechanical noise coming in and movie sound going out.


I always find the differences in building code interesting. Here, horizontal drains are 1/4" per foot and 1/8" under the basement floor to the street.


In Toronto we have a place called The Door Store that manages to get large quantities of stuff from tear downs and Sam also imports shipping containers from Europe full of amazing architectural details. I was trying to match my 1907 cast bronze door knobs. He said he'd seen them before and pulled out 6 complete sets. Incidentally, soaking metal work, such as your EXIT sign in methyl hydrate over night softens paint, so that you can take most of it off with a toothbrush. And it doesn't eat at defects in the plating like strippers can. Just keep it wet or it hardens very quickly as it dries. I think the white lettering is fired into the glass.


If you were closer, my welder loves making things like your grills at ridiculously fair prices, about 30% less according to his other clients that shop around.


With the base, I would suggest a full miter and have a section running vertical, against the riser and then miter back to horizontal on the riser. Leave it 1/2" off the floor and riser to tuck the carpet underneath.


No nosing where? It makes a nice finishing detail on the top edge of the riser, whether you carpet it or not, If you aren't carpeting the front of the riser, you can finish the carpet by tucking it under the nosing and stapling it. It is actually required by code on the stair tread, unless the stair riser slopes back 1". Either way the front edge of the tread must be 1" out over the back of the tread/floor below. Including the riser deck. Otherwise you will trip/kick the riser walking up.


The chair rail would be coped into the side of the pilaster.


I hope your foot is healing nicely and you ARE keeping up with the therapy!

I'll try to respond to all your questions/comments here, in order....


The HVAC is a 10" flex duct, meaning the interior pipe is 10". Insulation adds thickness, of course. But from a CFM perspective 8" flex is minimum and 10" is more ideal for a slower air velocity.


I've already thoroughly cleaned the exit light from all but a few very small spots of paint. The electrical connection is welded into place and the original stickers for this antique were still on the back. If I dipped the item I would lose the stickers and potentially damage the electrical connector. The white paint on the light is indeed baked-on enamel.


Once my metalwork design is laid out in CAD, this dwg file can be used directly in a laser cutting machine. The column inserts will be made from 1/8" plate steel. Run time for each insert is unbelievably under 10 minutes each and the laser cutting process leaves no burrs, so grinding after cutting is also not required. Total cost of each panel should be in the $150 range which is fairly inexpensive for custom work I have to say.


I wasn't clear in my statement above regarding the nosing....I meant nosing on the leading edge of the riser. I would simply extend the riser decking beyond the vertical to create the nosing out of the decking ply, rounding over the top first with a roundover bit once fit is confirmed and before final installation.


The chair rail will be butt up against the sides of the columns so coping is not possible - it will be a butt joint and there will be no self-return. Doing the full 45 degree miter for the base is one of the options I am considering. I am not sure yet which way I will go with the design. I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.


Foot is still healing slowly, unfortunately. They say recovery can take up to two years before I could get back into running or impact-based exercise without further damage....*SIGH*... Thanks for your thoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter #407

Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim  /t/1442340/the-stonewater-cinema-build-thread/390#post_23125850


PS It only costs "more money"!

You're not kidding!!! I have heard of DensArmour, but not FiberRock. I pulled up a local distributor on the net and it is 55 cents per square foot which means almost $33 per sheet (with sales tax) for this stuff. I'd rather save the money and invest in more 5/8" Type X and the additional Green Glue than the slight mass advantage of FiberRock. Plus, like you mentioned, it is dusty as heck to cut so that is another strike in my book.


I think in the end I am down to either adding one extra layer of 5/8" and Green Glue on top of my 7/16" / Green Glue / 5/8" drywall sandwich . . . .or not. I'll probably skip the second layer because as you may have already seen, any theater wall that is not in front of concrete already has a layer of 7/16" OSB, Green Glue and 1/2" drywall. Then there is a 1" air gap followed by the real theater interior wall. Between all this I think the 2nd layer of 5/8" would help with LF, but probably not enough to really matter. And as I said before, the rest of the walls have the concrete foundation behind.
 

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Tim,

Came back last weekend from spring break trip to Asheville and Charleston. Loved the Carolina s! B.T.W who is the model in the Unfinished man pic you posted above
 

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Discussion Starter #409

Quote:
Originally Posted by vikgrao  /t/1442340/the-stonewater-cinema-build-thread/390#post_23129757


Tim,

Came back last weekend from spring break trip to Asheville and Charleston. Loved the Carolina s! B.T.W who is the model in the Unfinished man pic you posted above

Glad to hear you liked it. My wife and I certainly enjoy the cool weather without the snow in the winter and the six months of near-perfect weather in the Spring and Fall. Summers can have their steamy days, but hey . . . it's Summer, right? If you are ever through this part of the country again, please be sure to let me know!


I'm not sure who the girl is and Google has totally let me down in my search :-(
 

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Thanks! i will let you know. I don't mind steamy summers!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG  /t/1442340/the-stonewater-cinema-build-thread/390#post_23126066



The chair rail will be butt up against the sides of the columns so coping is not possible - it will be a butt joint and there will be no self-return.

FYI It's a terminology thing. "Coping" is cutting the end of a piece of trim with a coping saw to make it shaped to the object that it is going to butt-up against. I thought your pilasters (half columns) were curved and therefore the rail could not simply be cut square when it stopped at the column.



I'm caught up! Hopefully I can now comment on something that wasn't finished 3 months ago!
 

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Discussion Starter #412
I will probably have the leading edges of the column rounded to go with the Art Deco style, but the sides will return perpendicular to the wall. I had briefly considered having an entirely round column, but it became too difficult and FAR too expensive to round the alabaster and metal inserts to the correct radius.
 

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Discussion Starter #413
PROGRESS UPDATE:


Since I have been working on finishing the nursery and a handful of other projects on my "honey-do" list before baby comes, my theater progress has been relegated to continuing forward on clarifying the internal design. It is particularly important to get the carpet and fabric choices nailed down now since another member, fax6202 ( Kinetic River Cinema ) has offered to help produce different finish samples for the African Mahogany veneer. Over the past six weeks I have looked at thousands of different styles online and I keep coming back to my original choice of Kane Carpet's Charming style...only I am seriously considering making the switch to the color "Stonehenge" from "Obsidian". I even bought a large size sample of the Stonehenge color so I could really dial in the color-matching and get the hue of the wood finish just right. That carpet sample came today so I thought I would take a few minutes and share some photos.


Taken in direct sunlight:



Taken inside the house under halogen light:



Pictured with unfinished African Mahogany:



Family shot with African Mahogany, Alabaster and black fabric I will be using with the FOSI fiber optic star ceiling:



I appreciate everyone's thoughts / comments and any carpet suggestions you may have.


As a side note, I got as estimate through the same local carpet store I ordered this sample. The carpet is $54.45 per square yard and I need 36 yards given the carpet's 12'10" width and a pattern repeat of 38.58"W x 39.37"L. Padding is $5.31 per square yard. Freight is a reasonable $95 and installation is a flat $399, which may go higher once they see the riser and two steps. All totaled carpet, pad and installation for the theater would be $2808.22 which isn't all that bad considering the quality level of the carpet and pad used for the installation. They also only charge for installed carpet and not all the extra left on the roll which they take with them which is another bonus.


Looking forward to some feedback. Please don't be afraid to beat up my selection or make any other recommendation - you can't hurt my feelings so let the comments rip, both good and bad!
 

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Obviously, the stand-out issue with the carpet is the "lightness." You're well aware of the trade-offs, so there's no point in that conversation. In terms of the aesthetics of the pattern and color, I've got no complaints - just a couple observations.


The brown field/background color is remarkably neutral - not warm or red. Are there small blue or grey fibers in there keeping it cool? Only under sunlight does it yellow - but what doesn't, right? I bring this up, because for me, it's important to keep the overall warm/cool balance consistent among your various finishes. The black is neutral, obviously, and the alabaster can be pushed either way - so the carpet and wood have to work together - their aesthetic relationship defines the look of the room. This brings me to my concern - that the wood will be either too warm or overly muted or "ashy" to keep the balance and let them work together.


If you agree with this overall philosophy, that leaves two options I think. First, be very careful with the wood finishing - I'm sure Dave is up the task of finding the right finish if he understands what the target is. Or second, find a warmer carpet color.


Naturally, you have your own philosophy about matching colors and building a look and feel for the space, and I may be thinking about it in a way that is unnecessarily restrictive. Don't mind me



Second, what kind of pad was recommended? I'm still trying to figure out whether the fiber pads that the acoustics book refer to really exist, or maybe they used to and no one in their right mind would revert to that old stuff when the newer pads are so much better (do you know what I'm talking about at all here?)


Last, I'm really surprised by the reasonable estimate for installation labor. I was thinking it would be a lot more - that's good news. (I've never priced carpet installation before)
 

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Discussion Starter #415
Hey Fred. Thanks for the feedback.


Could you do me a favor and go to this link for Kane Carpet's Charming style and let me know what color you like. Do you like the Claret? I have samples of Obsidian, Stonehenge (featured on the page) and Noche. I really like the Obsidian the best, but after I started thinking about things a bit more I realized that if I had black carpet and a black ceiling I would be making myself a black sandwich. I also picked up on a deal for some used but like-new Berkline 090 black leather theater seats....8 of them. It was for these reasons I was starting to think that I should change up the color of the carpet to get a bit more contrast with the seating and avoid a sea of black separated by some finish carpentry. Let me know your thoughts. I will also dig out the "Noche" sample and post a picture. The look of the carpet was completely different and the dark area is a kind of navy color. It looked good on the web, but I wasn't quite digging the real-life sample. I would like to know your thoughts.


There is a touch of a greenish color in the Stonehenge carpet. I did the best I could to photograph it in a few spots on the carpet. The hard part is that these pictures are taken under very bright halogen lights which have a yellowish hue, so it's not 100% color accurate. I also took the sample and threw it in the middle of our family room which is truly neutral medium tan carpet to show how much darker this new carpet actually is vs. a standard neutral. To answer you question they exclusively use the DuPont Stainmaster pad. It's an 8 pound pad with a built-in vapor barrier and anti-microbial stuff. The wool pads are OK, but very expensive and do not have a moisture barrier. I know some books recommend natural fibers, but I'm stating with absolutely no evidence that I don't think there would be that much of a difference between the two that could be heard or otherwise tuned into compliance during room calibration.



Close up 1



Close up 2



Close up 3



Full sample against neutral tan carpet with flash



Full sample against neutral tan carpet without flash



To your point about warming up the space and not having it be a palace of bland....I think a lot of that could be accomplished with the fabric that will cover the acoustic panels since it will be everywhere around the room. I had contacted TK Living because they have some very nice patterned fabrics in classic cinema / movie palace styles. I am embedding their full pdf catalog here for anyone to download since it isn't available directly off their website for some reason (TK rep said it was OK). I like a number of choices, but the style "Garbo" in the "Red and bronze" or "Red and gold" colors is in the lead. Real samples have been ordered in Garbo and several other styles, so more pics to follow once those are received. I won't divulge what other styles I picked because I'd like to hear some feedback on what styles / colors would integrate nicely. Here's the catalog.

TK Living_Fabrics_9 16 10_SCREEN.pdf 3129k .pdf file


And as luck would have it, the Regional manager for Guilford of Maine lives about 10 miles from me here in Charlotte. He has 100% of GOM's fabric samples in binders, so that is an incredible reference to have when reviewing their catalog for possible acoustic fabric options. I called him and explained my project. He was into helping and we now have plans to meet at his house (he works from home) and we can tear through all the possible samples he has. I'll be sure to post photos of that after the meeting happens.


You raise some excellent points regarding the wood...and this is why I feel very fortunate to have Fax6202 helping out. He has a lot of experience and a complete arsenal of dyes and pigments that will either remove or enhance certain hues. You can see a very slight but natural reddish tinge to the African Mahogany. Yellow dyes will counteract the red and allow you to stain in more of a Walnut color. Or a different dye could be added to enhance the red. So we have it narrowed down to maybe a dozen different test pieces to be further narrowed down to a handful for which I will post pictures here with the carpet, acoustic fabric, alabaster, etc. to give everyone the full-room color schematic and different options before I stain up the big pile 'o veneer and make a very expensive mistake.


I thought the install labor was reasonable as well. My guess is that will go up once they see the riser, the stage and the steps, but probably not by more than $150. Either way it is worth it to me...I have zero interest in DIY carpet install!!
 

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Just looking at the samples online, I agree with you that Obsidian is the best choice, on paper anyway. We still haven't seen a render of your columns, (hint, hint) so I don't know how much light and light space they will present. I have a hunch that you won't feel overwhelmed by the blackness of it all when it comes together.


If you are really concerned about too much black, I think I would lean toward the claret. It looks a little brash in its redness online, but I would bet that it tamed in person. Plus, like I was saying earlier, a redder color family would probably be easier to match with the wood, and might be a little more natural feeling as a theater - in that stereotypical way, yes, but because it works. Do you have a digital render going that you could paste this into?


I also like the Monticello a good deal, but I am always concerned about mixing black and dark browns.


I was hoping that you would DIY the carpet install so that I could learn how to do it.
Actually, my FIL has done it, and I was considering it - but maybe not if it's that cheap.
 

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I'm with Fred on this. Now, I'm not bashing your choices, so remember you asked for opinions! I don't care for the beige carpet above (beige covers a wide variety of browns for me). We've lived in too many houses with contractor beige...... everything! So I'm particularly biased. With that said, If I step back and think about the overall style of your theater, that color fits. I would still be afraid that it would blend in too much, and I'm not sure it would get noticed. The last two pictures of it look better as it's darkened up quite a bit.


From the site you posted, I like the obsidian and the claret, in that order. If I had to choose from the beige color pallet, I might lean towards the Monticello, but only because I'm having to pick.
 

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As we wrap (for most readers) to the next page, I'm pasting some of the patterns to a jpeg for reference. Obviously, these are digital and from varying sources, so the colors and scales can't be strictly compared. I've inserted some of my own biases (as images
) I wanted to get a little more color in there, and I'm unsure about having too many "floral" or (what's the word? damask type patterns?)

 

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Ok,


I'll weigh in as well. As a CCC I feel I'm actually obligated to do so. Right?


My first choice is for the Obsidian, and here is where I split with the crowd, Noche would be my second choice, then the Stonehenge, finally the Claret.


I can see your concern about a see of black, but I think that there will be enough relief with the other elements in the room, or you could simply go with one of the lighter carpets to help break that up.


The African Mahogany even in the buff looks fantastic, the grain structure is simply beautiful.


Looking forward to seeing that incorporated into the build.


Regards,


RTROSE
 

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Hi Doc

You put it out there...


This is a Deco Theater. You know that the selected carpet is a Persian tribal motif?


In low lighting, you lose your depth perception with black (and everybody's eyes aren't as good as yours), so I would recommend against the obsidian, Listen to J_P_A on the beige. In this pattern, my vote would be for the claret. But then I like red for a Theater. The Paramount Theater does have some red, but predominantly green, but I don't see any Mahogany. I have oiled Jatoba (Brazilian Cherry) floors that have aged to a deep Mahogany colour (what your Mahogany would go to, if unstained) and a Mahogany Dining suite. I have a Oriental carpet with a green field colour like the stairs in the "Metalwork between main lobby and balcony lounge" picture. They go together. "Complimentary colours"


You have chosen Mahogany. What is it about the wood that you like? The colour (at what age/colour and finish???) or the grain? I usually suggest to pick a wood that is naturally the desired colour, because stain can do some funny things to the final appearance. Sometimes it enhances the grain if the stain is subtle, but more often it hides the natural beauty of the wood. You are using "African". There are several African species sold as Mahogany, so make sure any solids are the same or similar species or the stain will have to be adjusted for one of the woods.


Anyways, it seems that the Mahogany is the key element. I would narrow down the final colour of the wood before looking at specific carpets. When you have a carpet that generally suits the wood, you can always tweak the wood colour for fine tuning.


If it is the grain that you like, do what ever you want to the colour and in this case you could pick the carpet first.


I found a carpet at last years IIDEX show (like the Chicago Interior design show) that I said, "That's the carpet for my theater". I've just looked through the brochures and can't find the manufacturer. They were supposed to send me a sample, but didn't. Here are two red carpets from your supplier that would accentuate the red of the Mahogany and go with the black(?) chairs.


http://www.kanecarpet.com/products/index.html?g=1&f%5Bstyle%5D=Palace+II&f%5Bdesign_type_id%5D=&f%5Bfiber_yarn_id%5D=&f%5Bcolor_id%5D=&f%5Brug_item_id%5D=&f%5Byear%5D=&f%5Bname%5D=by+keyword ... in Regal Red.

http://www.kanecarpet.com/products/index.html?category=6&page=11&id=3737



Are you doing wainscoting or just a chair rail? ...what colour is below the chair rail? If it is mahogany, you'd want a complimentary or contrasting colour above, not more red, for the panels. If it is not Mahogany, but paint, I'd make it darker for the weight and lighter above. I seem to be into the greens lately...very calming. Calming is good.


The green carpets in the Paramount are interesting, but not what I would have thought of as Deco...are they reproductions?
 
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