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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to make short list of some difficult chapters that you use for testing deinterlacing, black levels, chroma bug...

I would appreciate very much if you could post some.

I was thinking of this 27th chapter of Gladiator Z1 where the sand is so difficult to get clear without noise/artefacts.


Any other reference?


Thx in advance


ps to moderator: this could be a good basis for testing future products such as new chipsets/dvd players... if you want to make a special thread / faq / reference paper...
 

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LaurentB,


from the ever-resourceful hometheatherhifi.com site:

http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...ug-4-2001.html


Look for the table that shows all test discs and what they test for.


Very comprehensive for de-interlace testing.


We need more discs to test other issues. My picks:


Black levels and black region contrast: Dark City (very good for black material)

DVD error correction: Kiss of the Dragon (Canadian R1 release has errors pressed on the physical layer of the disc)


Others, please add your own.


cheers,

Halcy
 

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sspears,


I'm sorry my English doesn't always come through as I mean it :)


What I mean by printed errors that the two copies of Kiss of the Dragaon have anomalies from the pressing of the disc. They are such that you can even view them by looking at the disc with your bare eyes (i.e. the reflection layer is not correct).


When you play this disc some players will freeze up (Nintaus), some will break up the image (MPEG-2 decompression problems when there are errors that can't be corrected in the MPEG-2 stream) and some players will just interpolate beautifully (Philips 962SA being a good example) with no visible artifacts.


As for black region contrast. This is what I mean when I say that some projectors clog up in the black range. The information in the darkest 0-15% of the image is all same intensity black (or some level of grey that tries to mimic black). Especially noise in the video section can mask this black region detail and projectors usually compress (or otherwise lose) this information almost completely. It's as if you set your black point in Photoshop to 15% above absolute black and everything below that turns the blackes black the player/projector can show. Everything between 0-15% lightness value is lost.


I hope that explanation was at least a little better. English is not my first language and I still think in Finnish even when I try to write English :)


cheers,

Halcy
 

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Sounds like a below black problem. I was recently involved with a little research project at work where we took several comercial DVDs, transfered some scenes to digital beta (via SDI), we then edited the tapes so they were split screen. We then clipped black at 0 IRE and white at 100 IRE. You could then see the effect of what happens when a player did not pass BTB. As a side note we did calibrate the monitors using a proper PLUGE. These were BVM monitors. This pretty much proved that things don't look right if you don't handle head room and toe room. We used Toy Story, Talented Mr. Ripley, Bubble Boy, and Star Trek: First Contact. All had lots of below black and above white content.


I understood the pressing problem, I just found it funny that this happened.
 
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