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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Finished in March of 2018 - Summary post in Feb, 2019:

Hey there! From a thought, to digging, to designing, and building... creating this special space under a suspended garage slab was SO much fun. It was such a GREAT and economical way to maximize price per sq foot for our home and an amazing canvas in which to build a theater.

This project would not have been possible without the gracious help I received on this forum. From design to build - I’m grateful for all y’alls help.

It’s been a year since we finished and I have to say that I am more than pleased with how this semi-DIY theater planned out. Enjoy!

Current Setup:
Projector: BenQ HT3550 4K HDR
L/R Speakers - Episode 900 Series In-Wall Home Theater Speaker with Dual 7 in. Woofers
Center Channel - Episode 900 Series In-Wall Home Theater LCR Speaker with Dual 6-1/2 in. Woofers
Side and back surrounds - Episode 900 Series In-Wall Home Theater Surround Speaker with 6-1/2 in. Woofer
Atmos Height Speakers - 4x Episode 1700 6” Signature in-ceiling
Screen - 160” Dragonfly Acoustiweave (AT) 16:9 1.0 gain white screen
Receiver - Denon AVR-X6300H 4K 11.2 Channel Atmos
Pre-amps - 2x 300W Episode dual channel. One for Front L/R and one for one of the two pairs of side surrounds.
Sound-dampening/acoustics - Episode Acoustic Paneling
Seating - Going for cush and value - I went with the Everest modular sectional from Sofamart.










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Original post:

I'm about to break ground on a house on the Wasatch Front here in Utah and I'd love to tap into the community's amazing helpfulness and resources to help me build an awesome Home Theater. I'd love to document this along the way since I don't see a lot of what I plan to do on this forum.



The house we are building is a rambler and we are building a 600 sq foot room under the garage for our theater. I've looked at a few threads on here about suspended slab theater rooms but haven't seen one come to full completion yet.



This will be my second foray into building a home theater. My first was more of multipurpose room in my old house's basement and light control wasn't great. I had pretty good success with my BenQ W1070, 100" fixed high contrast gray screen, and 7.1 Epsiode Speakers surround setup.



For this home theater I still want to create it based on some sweat equity and value driven decisions but also want this place to shake and be on the mid-to-high end spectrum. I'm really excited about the suspended slab idea to crank it up and have better sound isolation from the rest of the house. A true man cave!



Here is where I am at in terms of equipment selection (with links)... any feedback is appreciated on the equipment.



Projector - Epson 5030

L/R Speakers - Episode 900 Series In-Wall Home Theater Speaker with Dual 7 in. Woofers

Center Channel - Episode 900 Series In-Wall Home Theater LCR Speaker with Dual 6-1/2 in. Woofers

Side and back surrounds - Episode 900 Series In-Wall Home Theater Surround Speaker with 6-1/2 in. Woofer

Screen - Dragonfly 16:9 .9 gain 133 in HC Gray screen (also considering a 125" 1:2.35... feedback? Would I be happy with that ratio with this projector?)

Receiver - Undecided

Pre-amps - Should I get one for each of these speakers?

Sound-dampening/acoustics - would love some advice here specific to my room.

Seating - Would like seating for 8-10. I already have 4 reclining pieces and consoles for "The Cloud" from Sofa Mart and we have loved them. Most likely will buy 6 more sections and 3-4 more consoles for it. for the second/(third?) row.



Here is what I'm having a hard time with. The room is BIG. It is 22 x 28 with 9 foot foundation walls. The slab ceiling will have a 3" drop from back to front for garage grading so we will level that out when framing. With studs, slab, and grade accounted for we are looking at a 8'6" ceiling most likely. Roughly 5200 cu ft. How would you all tackle this space? Is it too big? Would two risers (three rows) of seating make sense? How am I going to fill this with good sound? I would love some layout and design input. Here is a snapshot of the layout design.



Thanks in advance and I can't wait to get this going!
 

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You could easily get two rows of four plus a bar in that room. It would be more difficult to frame, but you could go with a stair-stepped ceiling similar to some of the DE designs to make the best use of your ceiling height, but may not be worth it for 3". With a 8.5' - 9' ceiling, I would limit it to a single riser, hence a third row bar instead of a row of seats. You run out of space pretty quickly with a 9' ceiling (ask me how I know :) ).

Depending on how close you like to sit, your first row will end up at 1 to 1.5 times the screen width (generally speaking). This is very much a personal preference. If you like to sit further away, consider a second row prime seating. If you like to sit closer, maybe a first row works better. Once a row is decided on, you need to allow 7' of space for the other row.

Choosing equipment before the room is built can be a bad idea because you design the permanent structure around pieces that will change, though it does help with some decisions. Why did you choose in-wall speakers? With a room that large, there's really no reason to use in-walls unless you already have them, or are particularly fond of them.

Soundproofing the room is always advised here. You should probably get in touch with Ted at the soundproofing company and figure out your best approach. The most common approach I see here is to decouple from the framing using clips and channel, then add two layers of 5/8" drywall with Green Glue between. Since this room is inside a concrete shell, you may be able to skip the clips and channel and just frame a room inside the concrete shell that is completely decoupled from the house. That would probably be the cheaper option. For soundproofing, double doors are not a great idea either. Building a decoupled room inside a concrete shell sounds like a plan for great sound isolation.

You need to consider HVAC! My experience so far is that rooms this big tend to be easier to cool most of the time when it's just one or two people in there. My room stays cool with up to three people working in there with lights on and only the HVAC blower running (no cooling). However, I suspect that once you pack it full of people for a super bowl party, you may find that your HVAC is going to have to work harder. It is much easier to figure out how to get the air in and out now than it is to figure out once the framing is done. You're going to need much more air in that room than your typical HVAC designer is going to plan for.

If you're new to this, I would highly recommend you get in touch with Nyal at Acoustic Frontiers or SierraMikeBravo with Erskine Group and discuss options for a layout and acoustic analysis. Having a solid plan at the beginning will go a long way towards making a great space at the end. You are going to need acoustic treatments, and you might as well make sure you do it right. The cost of a layout and acoustic analysis is a drop in the bucket compared to what you're going to spend on building this room.
 

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You could easily get two rows of four plus a bar in that room. It would be more difficult to frame, but you could go with a stair-stepped ceiling similar to some of the DE designs to make the best use of your ceiling height, but may not be worth it for 3". With a 8.5' - 9' ceiling, I would limit it to a single riser, hence a third row bar instead of a row of seats. You run out of space pretty quickly with a 9' ceiling (ask me how I know :) ).

Depending on how close you like to sit, your first row will end up at 1 to 1.5 times the screen width (generally speaking). This is very much a personal preference. If you like to sit further away, consider a second row prime seating. If you like to sit closer, maybe a first row works better. Once a row is decided on, you need to allow 7' of space for the other row.

Choosing equipment before the room is built can be a bad idea because you design the permanent structure around pieces that will change, though it does help with some decisions. Why did you choose in-wall speakers? With a room that large, there's really no reason to use in-walls unless you already have them, or are particularly fond of them.

Soundproofing the room is always advised here. You should probably get in touch with Ted at the soundproofing company and figure out your best approach. The most common approach I see here is to decouple from the framing using clips and channel, then add two layers of 5/8" drywall with Green Glue between. Since this room is inside a concrete shell, you may be able to skip the clips and channel and just frame a room inside the concrete shell that is completely decoupled from the house. That would probably be the cheaper option. For soundproofing, double doors are not a great idea either. Building a decoupled room inside a concrete shell sounds like a plan for great sound isolation.

You need to consider HVAC! My experience so far is that rooms this big tend to be easier to cool most of the time when it's just one or two people in there. My room stays cool with up to three people working in there with lights on and only the HVAC blower running (no cooling). However, I suspect that once you pack it full of people for a super bowl party, you may find that your HVAC is going to have to work harder. It is much easier to figure out how to get the air in and out now than it is to figure out once the framing is done. You're going to need much more air in that room than your typical HVAC designer is going to plan for.

If you're new to this, I would highly recommend you get in touch with Nyal at Acoustic Frontiers or SierraMikeBravo with Erskine Group and discuss options for a layout and acoustic analysis. Having a solid plan at the beginning will go a long way towards making a great space at the end. You are going to need acoustic treatments, and you might as well make sure you do it right. The cost of a layout and acoustic analysis is a drop in the bucket compared to what you're going to spend on building this room.
This guy ^



Listen to him.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You could easily get two rows of four plus a bar in that room. It would be more difficult to frame, but you could go with a stair-stepped ceiling similar to some of the DE designs to make the best use of your ceiling height, but may not be worth it for 3". With a 8.5' - 9' ceiling, I would limit it to a single riser, hence a third row bar instead of a row of seats. You run out of space pretty quickly with a 9' ceiling (ask me how I know :) ).

Depending on how close you like to sit, your first row will end up at 1 to 1.5 times the screen width (generally speaking). This is very much a personal preference. If you like to sit further away, consider a second row prime seating. If you like to sit closer, maybe a first row works better. Once a row is decided on, you need to allow 7' of space for the other row.

Choosing equipment before the room is built can be a bad idea because you design the permanent structure around pieces that will change, though it does help with some decisions. Why did you choose in-wall speakers? With a room that large, there's really no reason to use in-walls unless you already have them, or are particularly fond of them.

Soundproofing the room is always advised here. You should probably get in touch with Ted at the soundproofing company and figure out your best approach. The most common approach I see here is to decouple from the framing using clips and channel, then add two layers of 5/8" drywall with Green Glue between. Since this room is inside a concrete shell, you may be able to skip the clips and channel and just frame a room inside the concrete shell that is completely decoupled from the house. That would probably be the cheaper option. For soundproofing, double doors are not a great idea either. Building a decoupled room inside a concrete shell sounds like a plan for great sound isolation.

You need to consider HVAC! My experience so far is that rooms this big tend to be easier to cool most of the time when it's just one or two people in there. My room stays cool with up to three people working in there with lights on and only the HVAC blower running (no cooling). However, I suspect that once you pack it full of people for a super bowl party, you may find that your HVAC is going to have to work harder. It is much easier to figure out how to get the air in and out now than it is to figure out once the framing is done. You're going to need much more air in that room than your typical HVAC designer is going to plan for.

If you're new to this, I would highly recommend you get in touch with Nyal at Acoustic Frontiers or SierraMikeBravo with Erskine Group and discuss options for a layout and acoustic analysis. Having a solid plan at the beginning will go a long way towards making a great space at the end. You are going to need acoustic treatments, and you might as well make sure you do it right. The cost of a layout and acoustic analysis is a drop in the bucket compared to what you're going to spend on building this room.
Great advice. Thank you! I will reach out to the contacts that you mentioned to get that ball rolling.

The reason I chose in-wall speakers is I love the clean look of flush-mount speakers if the performance is there. I can get equipment from SnapAV for a great price and had their Episode brand in-wall in my last setup and I was really happy with them. Those ones did not have a rear-enclosure and were open-backed. The speakers I mentioned above are their flagship line and are going to give you more predictable performance comparable to a free-standing speaker since they are completed sealed and enclosed on the rear. They have amazing reviews as well. I've considered their free-standing line but for aesthetics and the performance of these, I think its the happy marriage I'm looking for. Take a look at their in-room line and let me know if you think I would be happier with their top of the line in room stuff.

I totally understand not picking out projector and screen before layout is decided. I've ran the throw and screen sizes for the room and they fit nicely with what I think would work.

I wish I would have gone bigger than my 100" screen in my previous setup. I had a viewing distance of 13' in that theater room... and wanted more out of the screen. I'll play with my layout and optimal viewing distances. With a 133" screen I'm going to want my front row about 12-13' from the screen. Are you saying 7 feet between the back of the first row seat and the front of the back row seat or just 7 feet on center?

I agree with you... one riser should be plenty with a bar. I think I could squeeze 5-wide and be ok. I'll play with it.

Why would solid core french doors be an issue? Would you recommend a mini hallway between the french doors and the actual opening to the decoupled room? That may actually help me with finding space for and A/V rack near the rear of the room.

Would a soffit going around the entire ceiling of the room make sense for bass trap, accent lighting, HVAC, and wiring purposes?

Thanks again for your help. You guys rock.
 

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For a room this size, there's no reason you can't hide your speakers in columns. With an AT screen wall, the LCR can be hidden from view as well. If you build a sound isolated shell, then putting speakers in the columns and behind a screen wall will simplify the installation because you don't need to build backer boxes to maintain the sound isolated envelope.

French doors are hard to keep from rattling and hard to sound isolate. I'm not saying it can't be done, it's just more work. An intermediate room/hallway would certainly help with the sound isolation as well. Generally you would want a door at both ends of the hall, though. Just having a hallway that is open to the room on one end with the doors at the other doesn't really buy you anything from a sound isolation standpoint.

A soffit is a good idea. The majority of the rooms on this site will use them for lighting, wiring, HVAC, etc. You can run pretty much anything in there in order to keep the number of penetrations into the room to a minimum. The HVAC penetrations are generally the largest into and out of the room (aside from the door) and should be planned out well to maintain sound isolation. Ted and company at the soundproofing company have lots of SIMs that layout the options for you.

Plan for 7' from the back of the first row to the back of the second row (or center-to-center, it's the same). That will give you plenty of room to walk between the first and second rows.
 

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you should start thinking about the ceiling. Concrete is an excellent conductor of sound if you attach your ceiling with rigid attachment points the vibration will get transmitted. You can either float separate joists below the concrete resting on the side walls, or find an appropriate isolation clip that can be attached to the bottom of the slab floor. If you go the separate joists you will need 2x8s 12 inches on center or 2x10s 16 OC to span the 22 ft. Take that into account in your headroom calculation. 1f you can increase the height of the room now all the better.

If you go with clips and channel you will need something that can be secured to the bottom of the concrete. For some reason the boston tunnel comes to mind.

Not familiar with those speakers but I'm not generally a fan of inwalls in soundproofed construction. You can do it properly with backer boxes.

I would reccomend a white acoutically transparent screen rather than a crey screen, you have a light controlled room to work with.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
For a room this size, there's no reason you can't hide your speakers in columns. With an AT screen wall, the LCR can be hidden from view as well. If you build a sound isolated shell, then putting speakers in the columns and behind a screen wall will simplify the installation because you don't need to build backer boxes to maintain the sound isolated envelope.

French doors are hard to keep from rattling and hard to sound isolate. I'm not saying it can't be done, it's just more work. An intermediate room/hallway would certainly help with the sound isolation as well. Generally you would want a door at both ends of the hall, though. Just having a hallway that is open to the room on one end with the doors at the other doesn't really buy you anything from a sound isolation standpoint.

A soffit is a good idea. The majority of the rooms on this site will use them for lighting, wiring, HVAC, etc. You can run pretty much anything in there in order to keep the number of penetrations into the room to a minimum. The HVAC penetrations are generally the largest into and out of the room (aside from the door) and should be planned out well to maintain sound isolation. Ted and company at the soundproofing company have lots of SIMs that layout the options for you.

Plan for 7' from the back of the first row to the back of the second row (or center-to-center, it's the same). That will give you plenty of room to walk between the first and second rows.
Thanks JPA.

I'm starting to wonder about HVAC a lot more since you mentioned it... I have some figuring out to do. There will be a utility block out hole in the back of the room near the ceiling for everything to run through the foundation wall. I would like this room to have a dedicated run from the blower to isolate the room from the rest of the home. The problem is that we are doing truss flooring ILO standard I-joists so we will be running all duct work in the flooring... I didn't want any bulk heads or ceiling drops in the basement. I'm not sure how that will out work out with this room. I'm hoping that the home theater HVAC can all be in the truss flooring until it enters the room. This will create a small ceiling drop in the main rec room right where it enters but better than a room-spanning run. Anyone with experience on this?

I made a rudimentary layout to scale and it seems like everything will fit nicely in the room. Take a look and let me know what you think.

 

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I would second (or third) the use of an acoustically transparent screen with your speakers all behind it. It creates a much more realistic movie going experience with all your speakers even placed behind the screen. It looks like you definitely have the room for it.
 

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BIG's post above hits on something that I was wondering about as well. How do you intend to frame the ceiling in this room? If you can excavate further, you'd be money ahead!

With regard to your plan, I would like to have the step up to riser height outside the room. Maybe a landing outside the first set of double doors, or a set of steps in the short hallway. You'd have to plan door swings accordingly.

I would also plan for an AT screen and put the speakers behind it. That also has the benefit of getting the center channel up where it needs to be rather than under or above the screen.

FIY, I'm not sure two subs in the front corners is a good idea. A sub in all four corners is another story. With just two, I think at 1/4 and 3/4 is a good starting point IIRC. That's another plus for the AT screen wall.
 

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you should start thinking about the ceiling. Concrete is an excellent conductor of sound if you attach your ceiling with rigid attachment points the vibration will get transmitted. You can either float separate joists below the concrete resting on the side walls, or find an appropriate isolation clip that can be attached to the bottom of the slab floor. If you go the separate joists you will need 2x8s 12 inches on center or 2x10s 16 OC to span the 22 ft. Take that into account in your headroom calculation. 1f you can increase the height of the room now all the better.

If you go with clips and channel you will need something that can be secured to the bottom of the concrete. For some reason the boston tunnel comes to mind.

Not familiar with those speakers but I'm not generally a fan of inwalls in soundproofed construction. You can do it properly with backer boxes.

I would reccomend a white acoutically transparent screen rather than a crey screen, you have a light controlled room to work with.
I have a friend with an AT screen and the holes on it distort the image a ton. It is truly unwatchable. Is that generally the case with AT screens? Would having a narrower sound-stage with the speakers behind the screen negatively affect the experience? This would be the AT screen I would get if I went that route. 120" is the biggest that they make. It looks like it is more of a weave than perforated holes in a poly screen.

Would the speakers I mentioned qualify as your typical in-walls since they already have the backer boxes built in? It seems like the performance is going to be similar to freestanding speakers.

The 2x8/2x10 discussion scares me a bit with my real headroom... Is the reason behind using these ILO 2x4s the length of the longer room span or is it sound proofing?

Dropping the floor for this room another foot would add another $5k-10k in cost of construction. Can I have you call my wife and convince her to do that instead the built-ins she wants upstairs? :)

Usually pre-cast flooring systems sit in a 4-6" lip right under the edge of the 9' foundation walls. That takes another 4" from the 9' ceiling height in addition to the joists. Yeesh.. I've discussed with my builder about setting the slabs directly on top of the walls and reinforcing them on the side to gain that 4" in height. Details forthcoming!


 

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Subscribing to the thread.. I live in Utah too (Riverton), and have a similar setup. The home I purchased last year has an unfinished room under a suspended garage floor. I haven't had a chance to get started on my theater as I've had a bunch of other projects come up. You can see pics of my room here:

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/19-dedicated-theater-design-construction/1494918-razorwitz-s-dedicated-build-thread.html

I've been tossing around a few ideas, and am not sure exactly what to do just yet. Framing the ceiling is one of my big quandries. Sizing of the room is my other hurdle. I've only got 20' to work with in depth no matter how I slice it, so I think I will have to go with in-wall speakers.

If you're interested in working together on our theaters or comparing ideas, let me know..
 

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Perforated AT screens are different then Woven AT screens, order a sample of the fabric from Falcon or SeymourAV and see what you think. I've never seen an unwatchable.

It is possible your friend has an old style perforated, today Stewart makes what they call MicroPerf and again you could order a sample to see what you think

On this concrete ceiling I claim no hands on experience. My thoughts were that if you wanted to use room within a room soundproofing building technuiques you would use free floating ceiling joists and the size of the wood required is determined by the span of the room. You might have a chat with your builder about common building techniques in your area for finishing these types of ceilings. Then you have to factor in your soundproofing needs. Perhaps the ceiling is not going to be an issue in sound entering the house.
 

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I have a friend with an AT screen and the holes on it distort the image a ton. It is truly unwatchable. Is that generally the case with AT screens? Would having a narrower sound-stage with the speakers behind the screen negatively affect the experience? This would be the AT screen I would get if I went that route. 120" is the biggest that they make. It looks like it is more of a weave than perforated holes in a poly screen.

Would the speakers I mentioned qualify as your typical in-walls since they already have the backer boxes built in? It seems like the performance is going to be similar to freestanding speakers.

The 2x8/2x10 discussion scares me a bit with my real headroom... Is the reason behind using these ILO 2x4s the length of the longer room span or is it sound proofing?

Dropping the floor for this room another foot would add another $5k-10k in cost of construction. Can I have you call my wife and convince her to do that instead the built-ins she wants upstairs? :)

Usually pre-cast flooring systems sit in a 4-6" lip right under the edge of the 9' foundation walls. That takes another 4" from the 9' ceiling height in addition to the joists. Yeesh.. I've discussed with my builder about setting the slabs directly on top of the walls and reinforcing them on the side to gain that 4" in height. Details forthcoming!
Just stumbled across your thread, notice your a fellow Utahn. My room is almost the same as yours in size, mine is almost 32 deep x 22 wide, with the front of my theater being 12' tall. I am also using the episode 950/900 series speakers in mine with all the speakers installed in the columns themselves. I am on the tail end if my build, and can't wait for it to be finished. I was going to go with a AT screen, but choose not to because I wanted a larger screen instead and couldn't afford the brightness loss, time will tell if that was something I will regret or not. I don't think I will as my previous theater had the center above the screen and I still loved it. Our rooms almost sound the same, except mine is upstairs above the garage, and yours is downstairs below the garage! I am interested watching yours progress.
 

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If you're interested in working together on our theaters or comparing ideas, let me know..
That would be great! I'm building in North Lehi area. I haven't broken ground on my house yet so I'm realistically about 1 year out from executing on these plans. Ground-breaking is in about 2-3 weeks I'm starting the info gathering process now while I can still make (minor) changes to plans. My suspended slab room won't have any metal beams in the roof so there is a different set of challenges but it would be great to check out the work you are doing with yours.
Just stumbled across your thread, notice your a fellow Utahn. My room is almost the same as yours in size, mine is almost 32 deep x 22 wide, with the front of my theater being 12' tall. I am also using the episode 950/900 series speakers in mine with all the speakers installed in the columns themselves. I am on the tail end if my build, and can't wait for it to be finished. I was going to go with a AT screen, but choose not to because I wanted a larger screen instead and couldn't afford the brightness loss, time will tell if that was something I will regret or not. I don't think I will as my previous theater had the center above the screen and I still loved it. Our rooms almost sound the same, except mine is upstairs above the garage, and yours is downstairs below the garage! I am interested watching yours progress.
Do you have any pictures of your progress? DIY or hired out? I would to see your layout with that size of room. Gotta love that ceiling height though... 12'... wow. What brand of screen are you getting? SnapAV? Have you tried your speakers out yet? I would love to swing by and hear them when you have it rockin. How did you come about getting Episode speakers? They aren't what I would call mainstream... small world that you are in Utah and have the exact same speakers I'm looking at.
 

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Do you have any pictures of your progress? DIY or hired out? I would to see your layout with that size of room. Gotta love that ceiling height though... 12'... wow. What brand of screen are you getting? SnapAV? Have you tried your speakers out yet? I would love to swing by and hear them when you have it rockin. How did you come about getting Episode speakers? They aren't what I would call mainstream... small world that you are in Utah and have the exact same speakers I'm looking at.
Just click the link in my signature, will take you to my build thread. I am using a 199" cinewide Stewart screen. I haven't even heard the speakers yet. But, my best friend runs a home automation company/ theater business here in St. George, and it was what he recommended, and he sells me everything for cost to, so that helps. I have done everything in my theater up to the finish woodwork that is going on now, as i haven't ever done finish carpentry, so didn't want to tackle it, but the design is all from me...
 

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Just click the link in my signature, will take you to my build thread. I am using a 199" cinewide Stewart screen. I haven't even heard the speakers yet. But, my best friend runs a home automation company/ theater business here in St. George, and it was what he recommended, and he sells me everything for cost to, so that helps. I have done everything in my theater up to the finish woodwork that is going on now, as i haven't ever done finish carpentry, so didn't want to tackle it, but the design is all from me...
I clicked through and went through all 90 posts on your theater. VERY nice. Not sure I quite have the budget to replicate but it gave me a lot of great ideas. :) Do you have amps pushing each of your speakers? I can't wait for an update on how it sounds.

My biggest issue is headroom at this point. I'm meeting with my builder in the next couple of days to discuss excavating more in this room to get a true 9' ceiling.
 

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I clicked through and went through all 90 posts on your theater. VERY nice. Not sure I quite have the budget to replicate but it gave me a lot of great ideas. :) Do you have amps pushing each of your speakers? I can't wait for an update on how it sounds.

My biggest issue is headroom at this point. I'm meeting with my builder in the next couple of days to discuss excavating more in this room to get a true 9' ceiling.
My buddy told me you need something with power as the episode speakers are power hungry beasts. I got an Outlaw 7900 Amp, which is an ATI built amp. It outputs 300 rms watts x 7 channels. My side surrounds I am running in series, so 4 speakers are running on two channels. I am excited to be done, in the home stretch now....
 

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That would be great! I'm building in North Lehi area. I haven't broken ground on my house yet so I'm realistically about 1 year out from executing on these plans. Ground-breaking is in about 2-3 weeks I'm starting the info gathering process now while I can still make (minor) changes to plans. My suspended slab room won't have any metal beams in the roof so there is a different set of challenges but it would be great to check out the work you are doing with yours.

Do you have any pictures of your progress? DIY or hired out? I would to see your layout with that size of room. Gotta love that ceiling height though... 12'... wow. What brand of screen are you getting? SnapAV? Have you tried your speakers out yet? I would love to swing by and hear them when you have it rockin. How did you come about getting Episode speakers? They aren't what I would call mainstream... small world that you are in Utah and have the exact same speakers I'm looking at.
I live in the far north east corner of Lehi, right next to the big Smith's on the Timponogos Highway. You can see my build thread in my signature, but I've got Episode 700 speakers and a 120" Dragonfly Acoustically Transparent screen. I'd be happy to let you come check out it out sometime, just shoot me a PM. What subdivision are you building?
 
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