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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I could of sworn this thread existed. I searched every which way, including producers, executives, etc. Couldn't find anything.


Amazon Gives 2-Season Order To Horror Event Series ‘Them’ From Lena Waithe, Little Marvin, Vertigo & Sony TV – TCA


In a competitive situation, Amazon Studios has landed horror event series Them, from executive producer Lena Waithe (The Chi, Dear White People), and writer and executive producer Little Marvin. The project, from Vertigo Entertainment and Sony Pictures TV, has received a two-season straight-to-series order.


The first season of the anthology series is titled Them: Covenant.


Written by Little Marvin, the 1953-set Them: Covenant centers around Alfred and Lucky Emory, who decide to move their family from North Carolina to an all-white Los Angeles neighborhood. The family’s home on a tree lined, seemingly idyllic street becomes ground zero where malevolent forces both real and supernatural threaten to taunt, ravage and destroy them.


Little Marvin’s script stayed with me for weeks after I read it,” said Waithe. “He’s written something that’s provocative and terrifying. The first season will speak to how frightening it was to be black in 1953. It will also remind us that being black in 2018 is just as horrifying. This anthology series will examine the cultural divides among all of us and explore us vs Them in a way we’ve never seen before.”


Little Marvin executive produces with Waithe, along with Roy Lee, Miri Yoon, and Michael Connolly of Vertigo Entertainment. Sony Pictures TV, which has a deal with Vertigo, is the studio.


“My heart was still pounding an hour after I heard this pitch. The show is edge of your seat scary and addictive while also being provocative and socially relevant ,” said Jennifer Salke, Head of Amazon Studios. “We are thrilled to be in business with the incredibly talented Lena Waithe, Little Marvin and Vertigo.”


Waithe is one of the busiest writer-producers at the moment, with multiple projects across film and TV. She created and executive produces The Chi. She also recently signed a first-look deal with Showtime, the network behind The Chi. Waithe won an Emmy for Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series, and a GLAAD Media Award, along with an NAACP Image Award Nomination for Netflix’s Master of None episode “Thanksgiving” that she co-wrote. On the film side, her latest script, Queen & Slim, will go into production in January starring Daniel Kaluuya for Makeready, distributed by Universal. Waithe also serves as executive producer and writer of the upcoming TBS series Twenties. Her producing credits include the films Step Sisters and Dear White People, which later became a TV series in which she guest starred.


“I’ve always felt that dark, surreal times deserve dark, surreal mirrors to show us ourselves,” said Little Marvin. “And at this point in time one of the best ways to examine fractures in our world through the visceral and raw lens of horror. I’m beyond thrilled that our series has found its home with the fine folks at Amazon.”


https://deadline.com/2018/07/amazon...aithe-little-marvin-vertigo-prime-1202435751/
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
David Matthews Inks Sony Pictures TV Overall Deal, Joins ‘Them’ As Showrunner


EXCLUSIVE: TV/film writer and author David Matthews has signed a two-year overall deal with Sony Pictures Television. Under the pact, Matthews will develop new series projects under his production company Turned Out Inc. He also will serve as executive producer and showrunner on Sony TV’s horror event series Them, whose first installment is titled Them: Covenant. The project, from creator/executive producer Lil Marvin and exec producer Lena Waithe, has a two-season pickup at Amazon.


Matthews is coming off a stint as co-executive producer on Showtime’s upcoming series Your Honor. Separate from the Sony TV deal, he is developing a limited series at FX based on Manning Marable’s Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, with Critical Content and Get Lifted.


On the feature side, Matthews is adapting the book Assata Shakur: A 20th Century Escaped Slave, for Outlier Society Productions and Macro. He previously developed a comedy series at Hulu based on his memoir Ace Of Spades, about his coming coming of age as the son of a Jewish mother and Black father in Baltimore. He also wrote the books Kicking Ass and Saving Souls, which follows the adventurous life of Stefan Templeton.


Matthews’ series credits include Boardwalk Empire and Vinyl for HBO, Narcos for Netflix and Tyrant for FX.· He is repped by WME, Anonymous Content and attorney Victoria Cook.


https://deadline.com/2019/04/david-...all-deal-them-covenant-showrunner-1202584797/
 

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I'm all in for giant ants. They can even do a Lavalantula crossover event. The potential sequels are endless. C'mon Bezos, make it happen.
 

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Seems like Lovecraft Country crossed with a little Get Out. Hopefully it's more consistent than LC.

Interesting use of a cover of the Thomas Crown Affair theme song in that trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Them - Hair on Fire


Them - Down the Hallway


Them - Mold on Wallpaper


Them - Painted White

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
‘Them’ Creator & EP Little Marvin Talks Inspiration Behind The Amazon Anthology Series – SXSW Studio
By Amanda N'Duka

Amazon’s new anthology series, Them, is making its world premiere today at SXSW with a look at the first two episodes of the show, which was created by Little Marvin and executive produced by Emmy-winner Lena Waithe.

Set in the 1950’s, Them: Covenant centers on Henry and Lucky Emory, who decide to move their family from North Carolina to an all-white Los Angeles neighborhood. The family’s home on a tree-lined, seemingly idyllic street becomes ground zero where malevolent forces both real and supernatural threaten to taunt, ravage and destroy them.

“I started writing it a few years back during a summer where it felt like every single morning I was waking up and grabbing my phone and looking through my social media and news and seeing cell phone videos of black folks being terrorized in some way,” said Marvin, during his stop at Deadline’s virtual SXSW studio.

Continuing on the inspiration behind the show, Marvin shared, “It got me thinking a lot about the terror of that in my own life and experience of that, but also a gaze that sort of stretches back through history. It’s no secret that public spaces have been weaponized against Black folks since the dawn of this country but what I hadn’t seen was the tension between the public and the private and that most private and safe spaces as a home.”

He added, “Like everyone, I’m thinking a lot about this country lately and the American dream. Who gets their keys to it, who, historically speaking, have not gotten their keys to it and why? There’s really no more quintessential part of the American dream than the dream of homeownership. Especially for Black folks, it’s a point of great pride. So exploring the nightmare beneath that dream was really at the beginning.”

Them: Covenant, the first season of horror event series Them, stars Deborah Ayorinde, Ashley Thomas, Shahadi Wright Joseph, Alison Pill, Melody Hurd, Javier Botet, Ryan Kwanten and Percy Hynes White. It’s set to debut on Amazon Prime April 9 and has already been renewed for a second season.

“What I can say is that it’s a different time and a different place every season, Marvin teased. “What will stay absolutely the same is that we will take folks who have largely historically been marginalized, who have never populated the center of the frame and put those folks front and center and their own stories of American terror. So new story, new people every year, but that similar theme throughout.”

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Amazon's Them Terror Anthology Trailer Turns a Home Ownership Dream Into a Creepy, Racist Nightmare

We knew that Amazon Prime’s new horror anthology series, Them, followed a hopeful Black family that moves into an all-white Compton in the 1950s, only to be terrified by the horrors of racism outside of the house and get stalked by a sinister spirit within the house.

But thanks to the official trailer the streamer released on Monday, some of those terrifying attacks have been specified.

Created by Little Marvin, who executive-produces with Lena Waithe, Them garnered a two-season order from Amazon nearly three years ago, and premieres Friday, April 9. The trailer promptly unnerves with an eerily slowed-down version of Diana Ross’ “Home,” visions of blackface, a gaggle of bigoted neighbors staring in unison, and ********** dolls hanged in effigy. Also, one dangerously racist neighbor throws an object at family patriarch Henry Emory (Top Boy‘s Ashley Thomas) while he stands on the roof adjusting an antenna.

Betty (The Newsroom‘s Alison Pill), the most bigoted woman on the block, does her fair share of harassing and plotting in a voiceover, and can be seen putting sugar in the gas tank of one of the Emorys’ cars. When Ruby Emory (Us‘ Shahadi Wright Joseph) attends the local school, bullies harass her by making monkey noises, while matriarch Lucky (Girls Trip‘s Deborah Ayorinde) is the one who discovers the hanging dolls. Racial pioneering is not for the faint of heart.

“There’s no more quintessential part of the American dream than the dream of home ownership,” Little Marvin said at a press event earlier this month. “It’s a point of great pride particularly for Black folks, to own one’s home and to pass down intergenerational wealth. But, as you probably know, that’s been anything but a dream for Black folks in this country. In fact, it’s been a nightmare. So, it’s an opportunity to tell an American dream story of home ownership but peel back those floorboards a bit.”

Inside the house, meanwhile, the Emorys’ youngest daughter Gracie (Melody Hurd) hears and sees spooky things in the basement and later, is snatched into a seemingly innocent upstairs closet by an unforeseen person, or thing. Shudder.

“Terror and horror have a different ring in the imagination,” Little Marvin added. “Let’s face it, very few of us will experience actual supernatural horror in our lives. But terror is something we’ve all experienced.”

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
‘Them’ Is an Unconvincing Examination of American Horror: TV Review

By Daniel D'Addario

The fissures racism has carved into American life, and American lives, are so surreally deep that to convey them, artists must use the tools of exaggeration that genre provides. This strategy has been deployed several times over in recent years: Notable entries on television include “Watchmen” and “Lovecraft Country,” a superhero serial and a horror saga that narrate the legacy of hate in 20th-century America.

In their wake arrives “Them,” a limited series for Amazon Prime Video created by Little Marvin and executive produced by Lena Waithe. In the first season of what Amazon is calling an anthology, Marvin shows us a Black family moving from North Carolina to Los Angeles as part of the great migration of the 1950s, punished upon arrival by a racism that they couldn’t have imagined. As played by Ashley Thomas and Deborah Ayorinde, parents Henry and Lucky Emory refuse to be victims, even as the world around them seems committed to dragging them to hell. (Their daughters, played by Shahadi Wright Joseph and Melody Hurd, face terrifying troubles of their own.) Haunted by memories of the past they sought to escape back East — a time when the family suffered a graphically depicted act of racist violence committed by a deranged character, wildly overplayed by Dale Dickey — the couple are bonded in old trauma and new struggle. At one point, Lucky hallucinates her younger daughter’s hair lit on fire by a hot comb, while Henry envisions an apparition of a blackface performer. The terror visited on the Emorys over the course of their first 10 days in their new home in Compton is both of the sort committed by humans and of the sort that can only be explained in supernatural terms.

This represents a problem for “Them,” one that comes to a head in the form of a character played by Alison Pill. The self-appointed head of the welcoming committee, Pill’s Betty Wendell becomes an avenging devil when she sees the race of her new neighbors. She fumes and fulminates over the presence of Black people in her community; at one point, in a rage, she tears the paper off the walls of her home. “If a dog bites, you put it down!” she shouts at a confidante, urging violent action against people she sees as little more than animals. Such prejudices are all too real, but “Them” can’t resist giving Betty a backstory that implies her fury originates from a kind of dissociation, one with sinister and vaguely incestuous undertones.

“Them” centers on racism in a manner whose reliance on overstatement winds up feeling surprisingly unimaginative. If we are to have a story about hatred in 1950s America, horror elements might be potent instruments in rendering the seeming powerlessness and frightening isolation of Black characters. (Indeed, the fact of Compton’s restrictiveness about allowing in Black families in the immediate postwar era is depicted, through scenes spent with a dissembling real estate agent, with a creepy tension that suits the material.)

To use the supernatural as an explanation for the hate said characters face, though, lets the show’s more realistic malign elements off the hook a bit. Treating Betty as a monster means not having to investigate the idea that prejudices like hers exist within humans too.

The series gets a great deal right: In visual style and in the performances of the actors playing the Emorys, it captures a recognizable 1950s of the mind. A striking early sequence sees the family in integrated settings, being assisted by white employees at an appliance store and a soda fountain. The point is made, elegantly, that the Emorys have left behind the explicit bigotry of the American South for a place where the horrors are more insidious. Thomas and Ayorinde never evince a sensibility that is too modern for what “Them” is trying to do. Their characters feel of their time, and the show’s focus on the specifics of their situation allows the viewer to see how certain facts of American life persist through the decades.

But as the actors are overtaken by the animus against their characters, those characters get lost; we learn much more about what Henry and Lucky Emory must overcome than about who they really are. They’re the victims in a horror story — and there’s nothing wrong with that but for the potential insights that it leaves unfulfilled. Portraying the worst sorts of American bigotry such that we might learn from them is an interesting goal; doing so at punishing length without a clear endgame or compelling ideas arrives in a place of trivialization. The Emorys suffer terribly because they are Black and, after they move, because they have the audacity to take up space in a white neighborhood. But their suffering, as it stretches over 10 episodes (with an episode-long break, late in the series, for an austere look at an earlier instance of anti-Blackness in American history) reaches a point of excess that serves this project’s impulses as a genre show more than as one with something to say.

“Them,” with performances as Grand Guignol ludicrous as Dickey’s and Pill’s, and as vexed by pain and punishment as Thomas’ and Ayorinde’s, leans too hard on scariness at the expense of what truths those scares are meant to show us. Though it doesn’t lose sight of racism exactly, the show’s mind seems more firmly placed on the ways in which it might make us jump than make us think or feel. It’s an unfortunate reversal of the way series that look like it use genre to investigate race: “Them,” in the end, takes the far less interesting path of using race to investigate genre.

“Them” premieres on Amazon Prime Video on April 9.

 

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I watched the first episode last night and liked it but then I'm a fan of "The Chi" and Lena didn't disappoint. The horror part doesn't really show up until towards the end.
 

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I'm not really a fan of horror. It always seems silly to me, which is why I would normally only watch horror if there's a lot of (dark) humor involved (i.e., it doesn't take itself too seriously). That is, unless it's a really good story, with good character development/acting, excellent production values, etc. The jury is still out for me after one episode. There definitely isn't much of a humor streak here, beyond the creepy, caricatured neighbors. Though I think they are supposed to be more scary than funny (perfect example of how I am with horror: scary stuff looks silly).

Though I will say the period setting and production side of things are quite good. Ever since I got my LG OLED CX last September, I haven't been impressed with any 4K content I've watched (all of it on Amazon Prime). Upscaled 1080p content on an app like HBO Max always looks much better to me. But this is the first time I could actually tell I was watching a superior video format.
 

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I'm about four episode into Them and not liking it. I'm not sure if I'll go back to it. The show is about a black family that moves to Compton. The white people are trying to get them leave so lots of racism misery porn. There is supernatural stuff going on but I have no idea what it is. I really don't like shows where a ghost or something can do literally anything but for no reason at all they don't just straight kill people.

The show isn't bad I'm just sick of misery porn and hate stupid ghost with stupid powers that make no sense. I just watched The Nun which has the same problem. I was also let down before watching a episode because I thought it was going to be a series version of the movie with the same name.
 

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I'll watch this eventually but am in no rush...the trailers looked excellent but reviews are decent but nothing special...most reviews I've seen say Lovecraft Country did the same themes and story better
 
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