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Good morning folks,


I'm currently pondering whether an upgrade in amplification/receiver ability would be something worth pursuing in the near future, and I figured I'd toss this out there for some opinions on the matter.


Currently in my ~2500 cubic foot room, I've got:


Onkyo TX-SR707

Mains: Klipsch RF-5 (99dB w/ 2.83V @ 1m rated sensitivity, 8 ohms nominal, 9 feet from MLP)

Center: Klipsch RC-35 (96dB w/ 2.83V @ 1m rated sensitivity, 8 ohms nominal, 8 feet from MLP)

Surrounds: Klipsch RF-15 (96dB w/ 2.83V @ 1m rated sensitivity, 8 ohms nominal, 6.5 feet from MLP)

Subwoofer: SVS PC12-NSD


As it stands, I listen to movies mostly around -20dB to -15dB from reference with the occasional rowdy night at -10dB to -5dB. At -5dB, things are starting to become a good bit less comfortable, and I'm curious if this is A: simply because it's in fact, too darned loud for most normal people to comfortably enjoy, B: my room, which isn't treated in any meaningful way, or C: my receiver potentially running out of steam.


Now if I take the specs at face value, clearly I shouldn't be running out of juice. A simple calculation yields that each channel would only need between 30 and 50 watts to reach 105dB at the listening position, which I'd expect to be well within the capabilities of my receiver. However, if we assume the speakers are in reality closer to 4 or 6 ohm nominal and about 3dB less sensitive on average in room than what Klipsch rates, things change considerably.


All thoughts, comments, and concerns are appreciated.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve1981  /t/1419774/thinking-about-an-upgrade#post_22208991


However, if we assume the speakers are in reality closer to 4 or 6 ohm nominal and about 3dB less sensitive on average in room than what Klipsch rates, things change considerably.

All thoughts, comments, and concerns are appreciated.

I don't understand this...why would you assume your speakers are 4 or 6 ohms nominal? Most designs are largely over the nominal impedance for most of the frequency spectrum. If they rated them at 8 ohms, they are at least 6 ohms for most of that range.


I would be its either:

1. That's really freakin loud

2. Your room is overly bright leading to am emphasis on high frequencies to get the bass you want.
 
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