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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure were to ask but I'll try here, Is it worth spending the Extra $$ to have the THX in a Receiver??? Does it make the Movie sound that much better, or does it have to be a THX encoded Movie in the first place??
 

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Usually not. Many, many receivers meet or exceed the specifications for THX certification, but aren't; usually because the manufacturer doesn't want to pay for certification, or deal with the hassle. In most cases, THX is just a logo that says "I cost more."
 

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Here's some info. There's a lot more info online if you are bored. I have no opinion on the cert other than to say I don't concern myself with it. That does not mean I think it's just a rubber stamp. But a receiver which is not THX is not necessarily bad. I also question just what Select tells you. Before they created the tiers, I think AVRs would have been considered what is now Ultra certification - that represented more of a definable amount of power, AFAIK.

http://www.audioholics.com/education...eral-questions
 

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If a CEM offered an AVR for $500 w/o THX and one for $550 w' THX that would be an interesting buying decision. Since I don't think any CEM does, we really don't have any way to value a THX add-on? I don't know what CEMs pay THX for the license but if it was more than a couple of bucks/unit I'd be surprised. I also don't know what the cost differences are to build an AVR that meets the spec and one that doesn't but I'd suspect it would also be chump change. CEMs can use THX for model differentiation and to try to bump the consumer up that one step to a pricier unit. One thing that THX tangibly brings to the party is a handful of playback modes that many prefer.


If you check out this link you can find a rather extensive listing of what parameters are included in the certifying process: http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...06-part-1.html Much more than simple power specs. Does this mean that non-THX AVRs from the same manufacturer are not built to the same level of performance requirements? Probably not? Does this mean that non-THX AVRs meet all the minor requirements? I'd hazard a guess and say probably not? After receiving certification do the THX police police the CEM? Raid the factory? I don't think so although there may be some form of ongoing sample testing?


Going back to the $500 vs $550 question I'd probably think real hard about the $50. I think it brings more to the party than the non-believers believe and less the aficionados believe. If I have to think about it and don't do it I wind up kicking myself. OCD!!
 

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I'll second Mr. Giggles analysis.


While you may find an amp section that would pass THX muster in a non-THX unit, you won't find THX post-processing without THX cert. Whether you prefer it is a matter of taste. It's similar to some people preferring DTS:Neo or Neural Surround for channel expansion while I consider them artificially gimmicky and prefer the Dolby family (IIx Movie/Music).


I've done a bit of blind taste testing by cycling through the surround modes on my Onkyo 805 (THX Ultra2, 7.1 setup) without knowing what mode I was on (gear is enclosed in an armoire). Both on music (DVD-A/SACD) and movies (Dolby/DTS), I end up settling on either Dolby or THX with THX being the most commonly preferred, but on some material I can't tell the difference. I prefer to listen to CD PCM in stereo mode with no processing; the quality of expansion to 5.1/7.1 is highly variable by material in 2 channel, but I still think Dolby/THX do the best job here if I were forced to choose expansion over stereo.


As in most subjective opinions, YMMV. :)


-Brent
 

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THX Neural is nice. My 3900 has it, but is not otherwise THX certified. Not sure how it compares to normal THX cinema mode though!
 

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Depends what THX certification you are referring to..


THX Select..

THX Ultra 2..

THX Neural..


In the early days of home theater components, THX had more impact..

Now it is more related to marketing fluff..

Nice to have but don't pay more for it..


Just my $0.015..
 

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Worth it IMHO.


Four basic reasons why:


-Certification for driving hard impeadance loads;

-Knowing the receiver/amp you buy is capable of reference level in a certain size performance space before you buy;

- THX Loudness Pluss - for low volume listening with almost all of the original dynamic impact (big plus for those that can't play at reference level due to sleeping family or WAF); and

- THX Music Mode and THX Ultra 2 Cinema for re-encoding 5.1 sources to 7.1 sources with ReEQ (the biggest plus for my taste using SBR speakers).


If you don't have SBR and 7.1 the certification is just that (except for the Re EQ and the loundness plus) - a further guarantee that what is advertised is what you get.


Some Amps/Receivers are just as good without it but lack the sound processing and modes. Those alone are worth it to me.


I haven't purchased a receiver since 1998 without it and don't intend to in the future. I would consder separates without (provided my pre-pro has it) but no THX Ultra2 Plus = no sale.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJHuman /forum/post/17008732


THX Neural is nice. My 3900 has it, but is not otherwise THX certified. Not sure how it compares to normal THX cinema mode though!

The Cliff's Notes version...


THX Neural isn't related to the THX post-processing suite which is why it has appeared on some receivers/processors as a standalone mode. It's just another 2 -> 5.1/7.1 expansion algorithm, but Neural Audio also has an encoding component if a broadcaster wishes to use it. Neural Audio signed a marketing deal with THX a couple of years ago and THX Neural was born. Since then, Neural sold themselves to DTS...no clue if THX is still involved in the marketing of Neural or if Neural technology is simply being folded into DTS' other offerings.


-Brent
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by riverwolf /forum/post/17009047


The Cliff's Notes version...


THX Neural isn't related to the THX post-processing suite which is why it has appeared on some receivers/processors as a standalone mode. It's just another 2 -> 5.1/7.1 expansion algorithm, but Neural Audio also has an encoding component if a broadcaster wishes to use it. Neural Audio signed a marketing deal with THX a couple of years ago and THX Neural was born. Since then, Neural sold themselves to DTS...no clue if THX is still involved in the marketing of Neural or if Neural technology is simply being folded into DTS' other offerings.


-Brent

Makes sense. I had kind of guessed that.
 

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Something that annoys THX is that they create these certification "stamps", but don't bother explaining them. When THX first came out with the cert, there were articles on it.


Then, they wanted to expand the operation, so they created THX Ultra and Select.


Now we have Ultra 2 Plus, Ultra 2, Ultra, Select 2 Plus, Select 2 and Select. And their web page makes little attempt to explain all of them. Only thing I can find is an interactive room size "chart" and some marketing speak.


My guess is that Select vs Ultra probably determines under what conditions reference level must be obtainable. Plus or '2' might refer to features. I emphasize guess
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow I guess I asked a worthy "Q"
Good Opinions and great links, Now I know why it is in all the Star Wars Movies, I did not know it came from Lucas! I know when I watch the intro of a Pixar Movie the lil Robot flyind around the THX sounds amazing. I been looking at Recvrs in the $500-1k range and noticed some did not have THX (Particularly the Denon 3808) So I figured a thousand dollar Recv should have that as some of lesser value as the Onkyos 706 and pioneers do, Ahh man decisions decisions.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJHuman /forum/post/17009852


Something that annoys THX is that they create these certification "stamps", but don't bother explaining them. When THX first came out with the cert, there were articles on it.


Then, they wanted to expand the operation, so they created THX Ultra and Select.


Now we have Ultra 2 Plus, Ultra 2, Ultra, Select 2 Plus, Select 2 and Select. And their web page makes little attempt to explain all of them. Only thing I can find is an interactive room size "chart" and some marketing speak.


My guess is that Select vs Ultra probably determines under what conditions reference level must be obtainable. Plus or '2' might refer to features. I emphasize guess

THX Certification Specifications are available to those in the trade..


Basic differences between THX Select and Ultra has to do with room volume size, amplifier's RMS output voltage (watts), loudspeaker load impedence & # of channels driven..


Just my $0.015...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingvfreak /forum/post/17007415


...or does it have to be a THX encoded Movie in the first place??

No such thing as THX encoding. When you see the THX logo on a DVD title, it just means that the audio/video was mastered to their quality standards. Like UL approved or the Good Housekeeping seal. In all those cases, it doesn't mean there isn't better, but does assure a certain level of quality.
 

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I,ve seen many things with the THX logo that are small products that you plug your iPod into. Yet none of them compare to my old Outlaw Audio 950/7100 combo that is not THX certified.

Just my .02 YMMV


Lasher
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani /forum/post/17010422


No such thing as THX encoding. When you see the THX logo on a DVD title, it just means that the audio/video was mastered to their quality standards. Like UL approved or the Good Housekeeping seal. In all those cases, it doesn't mean there isn't better, but does assure a certain level of quality.

Ahhh I see now! I was in a mom and pop shop and asked about it and he told me everything had to be THX in the system to get the full bennefit/effect from Recv to THX cert speakers, that didnt make sense?? I think he was just tryin to get me to buy a whole new set up and rip me off!!!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoboRay /forum/post/17007802


Usually not. Many, many receivers meet or exceed the specifications for THX certification, but aren't; usually because the manufacturer doesn't want to pay for certification, or deal with the hassle. In most cases, THX is just a logo that says "I cost more."

Very agreed for"I cost more".Today THX certified product and software are a lot fewer than the past except for the top end of receivers,processors.I think thank to the HD era.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingvfreak /forum/post/17011532


Ahhh I see now! I was in a mom and pop shop and asked about it and he told me everything had to be THX in the system to get the full bennefit/effect from Recv to THX cert speakers, that didnt make sense?? I think he was just tryin to get me to buy a whole new set up and rip me off!!!

A THX receiver is supposed to achieve THX reference levels for the room size specified by the spec. It does not have to be continuous power as far as I know. They have some sort of burst test I thought.


A THX certified sub would complement this by being able to hit THX reference level as far as I know. Some subs might not be up to the task of 115 dB.


Same with speakers.


I never worries about all that stuff. I set my receiver to the desired volume, which is much less than THX reference in any case.
 
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