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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It begins.

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Time Warner Cable has chosen Maine as the starting point in its move to go all digital countrywide. The migration away from analog will happen in two parts, with the first set of channels cutting over to digital-only in late October and the second set in November.


[...]


According to a company spokesman, TWC no longer will offer analog signals to its cable customers in Augusta. If this works, it will tackle the rest of the state and then the rest of the country. Augusta customers who take TWC's Classic or Basic packages will need a small adapter that translates the signal from digital to analog. There's no charge for the adapters until January 2014, when a 99-cent per month fee will be charged for each device.
http://www.cable360.net/ct/47498.html
 

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The question is, will TW deliver the standard basic digital service in the clear, over clear QAM, so that those with digital tuners can continue to just plug the cable into the back of their TVs and get the same standard lineup over their QAM tuner? With no decryption box of any kind involved?


That's what WOW did. Kudos to WOW.


If I had a dime to bet, I'd bet that TW will encrypt everything. That's their legacy, and they'll go back to it as sure as the sun sets in the west...
 

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Keep in mind if they do keep them in the clear, using the DTA will use the RF input on your TV and that won't pass any in the clear channels as HD.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
"Time Warner Cable will increase capital spending the second half of the year, as the operator builds out a new "super headend" facility in Charlotte, N.C., and embarks on a five-year plan to convert to all-digital across its footprint... initially TWC will use Technicolor DTAs in Augusta, [Maine,] with potentially other vendors for later deployment."
http://www.multichannel.com/article/...l_Projects.php


I guess the Technicolor DTAs aren't the Motorolas we've heard mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Time Warner Cable has announced it will cease analog cable television service within five years, as the cable company embarks on a wholesale transition to all-digital cable.


The announcement came from CEO Glenn Britt during this morning's investor conference call, and represents a major transition for the cable operator and its customers.


We always said we would supplement switched digital video with going all-digital, Britt said. Our plan is to migrate all systems to all-digital over the next five years.
http://stopthecap.com/2011/07/28/tim...gital-systems/
 

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I seem to remember when Cable said, "Your (mean old) broadcasters are making you go digital, but not US....we love you!", and "With Cable TV, you won't need no stinkin' box".

Many people fell for it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenglish /forum/post/0


I seem to remember when Cable said, "Your (mean old) broadcasters are making you go digital, but not US....we love you!", and "With Cable TV, you won't need no stinkin' box".

Many people fell for it.

Could you post a link to where you found this quote ? Just curious.


Also there are still a few areas and cable companies that offer analog cable without the need for a box. So lumping the whole cable industry together based on what some companies do is Irresponsible.


Of course most likely all cable companies will go all digital at some point and you will probably need a box for anything outside of the locals. But anyone with any connection to the real world could not realistically expect that technology wouldn't change and that their 25 year old tv would be fully functional and compatible throughout it's entire lifespan without the need for extra equipment. Im sure when they paid $1000 for that 13in "cable ready" tv in 1985 the salesperson let them know that in 10 years there would be more than 35 channels and they would need a box to pick them up. That being said anyone that buys a new hdtv just to watch analog on it is wasting their money.


With the influx of competing streaming services, consumers desire for more bandwidth to use these services, and more HD offerings some changes need to be made to satisfy them. Contrary to popular belief, bandwidth the cable companies have is not unlimited.The analog generation is dwindling and the cable companies are adjusting their strategies in accordance.


The same thing happened with tapes/CDs , VCR/DVD, or any other technology shift. No one is saying you can't use your old equipment ,just expect the offerings to be limited, or expect to get a STB. Not to mention people have more choices than ever if they are unhappy with their current provider. Is it right to have to buy/rent new equipment to get a particular service or adapt to new technology? No, but that is the technology world we live in, and nothing lasts forever, hell, a 30+ year lifespan for analog cable is more than most technologies get.
 

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I suppose the loss of the concurrent analog feed was bound to happen at some point, however, I don't see what real additional cost is involved ..


Those of us that still actually use VCR's to time shift will face an additional hassle .. just another way for the providers to rent another set top box / DVR ..
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn /forum/post/20823827


I suppose the loss of the concurrent analog feed was bound to happen at some point, however, I don't see what real additional cost is involved ..


Those of us that still actually use VCR's to time shift will face an additional hassle .. just another way for the providers to rent another set top box / DVR ..

It more of the badwidth issue. Cable Companies face stiff competition from local phone companies like Verizon that are able to provide increasingly faster and faster internet speeds with "Fiber to the house" solutions, while Cable companies are limited by the capability of the old coax copper wire.


So, by removing analog rebroadcast, they can increase internet speeds, and remain somewhat competitive. Of course, Fios can bump internet to 100 Mpbs with just a flick of the proverbial switch (just a few key strokes on the computer).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weags /forum/post/20823786


Could you post a link to where you found this quote ? Just curious.

It was on a series of PSAs in the months leading up to the analog shutdown of OTA.


They basically said "Come June 12, all over the air broadcasting will cease. If you have an analog television set, you'll need a converter. If you have satellite or cable, you won't need anything and will continue to receive channels normally."


Not those exact words, but that was the gist.


Their cable companies had their own that was similar, but more slanted towards them, a la "With cable, you won't need to do anything."
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueiedgod /forum/post/20823942


It more of the badwidth issue. Cable Companies face stiff competition from local phone companies like Verizon that are able to provide increasingly faster and faster internet speeds with "Fiber to the house" solutions, while Cable companies are limited by the capability of the old coax copper wire.


So, by removing analog rebroadcast, they can increase internet speeds, and remain somewhat competitive. Of course, Fios can bump internet to 100 Mpbs with just a flick of the proverbial switch (just a few key strokes on the computer).

The tiny amount of bandwidth the concurrent analog feed uses has no bearing on ISP speed .. as well, using your own logic, the CATV providers would need fiber throughout the network, which is simply not happening ..


In my own case, I have 60mbps over copper, with CATV, phone and ISP .. Charter .. and a concurrent analog feed as well ..


If you have a link with qualified data to support your statement, I'd be curious to see it ..
 

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Quote:
The tiny amount of bandwidth the concurrent analog feed uses has no bearing on ISP speed ..

The additional B/W gained will allow for more CMTS channels including docsis 3, so less users per D/S channel can equate to more bits (speed) per user.
 

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IMO, cableco's are just taking advantage of the consumer(s). Not so long ago, one could have a "cable ready" analog TV and get expanded basic without an external STB.


Today, one can puchase a "digital cable ready" (QAM tuner), yet the cableco's force you to use a DTA or rent an STB to obtain the same channels (tier of service) and use "cable theft" as an excuse.


Bleh... it's about revenue. There's no reason what was done in the analog world, can't be done today with digital... and it's probably easier.

(I'm sure the "cableco employees" will try to justify this new policy.
)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RCbridge /forum/post/20824207


The additional B/W gained will allow for more CMTS channels including docsis 3, so less users per D/S channel can equate to more bits (speed) per user.

theoretically at best .. and if true, minimal ..
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa /forum/post/0



It was on a series of PSAs in the months leading up to the analog shutdown of OTA.


They basically said "Come June 12, all over the air broadcasting will cease. If you have an analog television set, you'll need a converter. If you have satellite or cable, you won't need anything and will continue to receive channels normally."


Not those exact words, but that was the gist.


Their cable companies had their own that was similar, but more slanted towards them, a la "With cable, you won't need to do anything."

Again could anybody post an actual LINK to any of these supposed quotes? Just rewording something and putting quotation marks around it doesn't make it official or any more misleading.


But as far as those PSA's it was basically to clear up any misconceptions people had about the OTA switch to all digital. Many people were being wrongly informed that they needed to buy new TVs and that their old ones would not work at all. Amongst other misconceptions. These were not promises about NEVER having to worry about boxes. And anything that was funded by the big bad cable monster would not have mentioned satelite to any customers or potential customers. Just clearing this up as the original statement made was supposed to be a quote from the cable monster.


Just food for thought, it is now over 2 years past the digital transition and not one of my customers for the company I work for did it impact. They still receive their analog as they did before the date. So I effect, as I stated, lumping all cable companies into a ball because some of them ended analog transmission, is ill-informed and irresponsible. Reiterating a "quote" in different words to make it seem like a broken "promise" when some cable companies have lived up to it, is also just as misleading.
 

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The rebate / push for OTA converter tuners Uncle Sam offered .. ??
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenglish /forum/post/0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DApY...971B72E45D57D9

A link to a comcast commercial does not speak for the entire cable industry as a whole as your quote had insinuated. Nor do I see any promises of NEVER needing a box. And as far as June 12,2009 this commercial was 100% true. It wasn't until later in the year that certain markets made the full digital transition.


In the future to if you could refer to actual companies policies rather than broad statements about Cable making what could be construed as broken promises. There is actually less truth in your original quote/opinion than in that comcast commercial.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman
IMO, cableco's are just taking advantage of the consumer(s). Not so long ago, one could have a "cable ready" analog TV and get expanded basic without an external STB.


Today, one can puchase a "digital cable ready" (QAM tuner), yet the cableco's force you to use a DTA or rent an STB to obtain the same channels (tier of service) and use "cable theft" as an excuse.


Bleh... it's about revenue. There's no reason what was done in the analog world, can't be done today with digital... and it's probably easier.

(I'm sure the "cableco employees" will try to justify this new policy.
)
Providing free dtas is not taking advantage of the consumer. Furthermore, not all cable companies require this to receive their expanded basic.


Maybe it is the manufacturers labeling a product as "digital cable ready" is where the misleading begins. Maybe it's these tv manufacturers taking advantage of the uninformed consumers. You could think of it that way too.


From a cable company employee perspective, having to trap out peoples services at the pole in an all digital network ,is a headache. It would include many individual filters for specific frequencies and would be impractical and cause issues as these filters tend to bleed over into other frequencies. Not to mention the spectrum management that would have to take place to make this feasible.


And of course theft is an issue too. How many cheater boxes do you see nowadays ? Or even hear about? Regardless of your feelings about how minuscule cable theft is, there was a time when it was very prevalent. And I'm sure if you provided a service that someone was getting for free, you too would do whatever you could to stop it from happening, or make it harder, not easier for people to steal. Hardware filters at the tap are easy to remove and unencrypted service is just as easy to steal.
 
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