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Discussion Starter #1
Thanks for the help. I'm going to build a decent quality Power Cable (male 3-prong to IEC female). I've built extension cables before using nice connectors - but never really thought about tinning the copper before securing each lead into the connector terminals. Is this something that I should be doing?

Thanks again.

-paul.
 

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I'd just buy the length(s) you need from Monoprice. They have them in many small increments if you're trying to get custom lengths. Cost will be less than the materials to DIY...

http://www.monoprice.com/Category?c_id=102&cp_id=10228&cs_id=1022801

But if you're going to build them, no, do not tin the leads. AC voltages and heating could cause problems, and if these are screw-down connectors, that can cause additional problems... And certainly doesn't do anything productive, anyway...

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'd just buy the length(s) you need from Monoprice. They have them in many small increments if you're trying to get custom lengths. Cost will be less than the materials to DIY...

http://www.monoprice.com/Category?c_id=102&cp_id=10228&cs_id=1022801

But if you're going to build them, no, do not tin the leads. AC voltages and heating could cause problems, and if these are screw-down connectors, that can cause additional problems... And certainly doesn't do anything productive, anyway...

Jeff
Ok. Thanks allot. I have all parts on order from PartsExpress. Should be here on Monday ...

-paul.
 

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No, do not tin the conductors or you will end up with chronically poor terminations. Pre-tinned conductors lose compression from the solder flattening over time, and will eventually work loose. If you tighten the connection further, the solder will flatten again, then work loose some more. Its going to be a repetitive condition. Cycles of heating and cooling will further aggravate the situation, and result in a high-resistance connection and possible fire hazard. Properly torqued bare conductors provide a certain amount of compression giveback, so you don't get the loosening of the connections.
 
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