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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building my theater room out and have a build thread started, but I've run into some questions about acoustic panels and want to be sure I don't do too many panels and make it "dead".


Here is a sketch of my room:




Yes, I know my platform curves the wrong way lol. And I know now I should have done the subs in front instead. Basically, I am planning (or thinking about) doing a panel above and below the chair rail and in between each of the columns. When I say columns, I just mean decorative fluted columns that protrude about 1" from the wall (not real columns).


I found some great 4" mineral fiber insulation at the local Johns Manville retailer. I bought some wood 1x3 and built frames and some black burlap to see how hard it would be to make the panels and it was a piece of cake. I made 4 of them which are 48x24x4. I set them up in my temporary theater room in a spare bedroom and it seems to have so much more bass and clarity. My speakers are all paradigms.


Anyway, my question here is if I do all these panels above and below the chair rail would it make it too dead? And are 4" thick too thick for that many panels? Or maybe choosing a shinier fabric to help deflect some of the higher frequency? Or should I do the bottom ones below the chair rail in mineral fiber and then the ones above the chair rail in some kind of batting?


Thanks,

Shawn
 

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You should ask this in the Dedicated Theater Room Design & COnstruction forum. I think you will find more qualified people to answer your question hanging out in that forum: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forum...aysprune=&f=19


There's a lot of talk about acoustic treatments over there because it's typically only done in a dedicated a room. In the master acoustics thread it said, if I remember correctly, in general to use fiber glass absorption below and batting above. It also said to use a good mix of diffusion (like a book case) and absorption on the back wall. The front wall should be made as dead as possible. However, I was cautioned that the advice came from a well respected pro who also makes custom bass traps out of the riser and/or columns to suit each room... since fiber glass panels don't do much for low bass, the "formula" above is incomplete for DIYers.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shawnwalters /forum/post/15558605


I found some great 4" mineral fiber insulation at the local Johns Manville retailer. I bought some wood 1x3 and built frames and some black burlap to see how hard it would be to make the panels and it was a piece of cake. I made 4 of them which are 48x24x4. I set them up in my temporary theater room in a spare bedroom and it seems to have so much more bass and clarity. My speakers are all paradigms.


Anyway, my question here is if I do all these panels above and below the chair rail would it make it too dead? And are 4" thick too thick for that many panels?

Which Johns Manville mineral fiber is it? Mineral fiber may be really dense, which increases its sound flow resistivity to the point where its effectiveness in absorbing a range of sound frequencies as actually reduced.


Regards,

Terry
 

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IMO thick panels are always better than thin panels. I prefer a few thick panels in proper places. Most any room benefits from 4" (or thicker panels) at the first reflection points. And big thick piles in as many corners as possible. You can over deaden a room by using too many panels. But it almost impossible to have too many thick piles, and if you do find yourself with too many you can put some of them in a thin plastic bag to reflect the highs.
 

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Or just hire Terry to do your room. I'm sure he does a great job - maybe not the best bang for the buck, but a good bang I'm sure. I don't know his rates, he could well be the best bang for the buck - unless you wanted to put the time and effort in yourself to learn about what works for you and your room. Since every room is unique, and speakers are different, as are

listeners preferences, it is impossible to provide a one size fits all solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Montlick /forum/post/15561365


Which Johns Manville mineral fiber is it? Mineral fiber may be really dense, which increases its sound flow resistivity to the point where its effectiveness in absorbing a range of sound frequencies as actually reduced.


Regards,

Terry

Jeez there are so many variables with this acoustic treatment stuff!


Ok it's called "Min Wool". Here's a pic of it, except mine is 4x24x48:




On the label it says Mineral Wool 1200.


Please dont tell me it's the wrong stuff
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shawnwalters /forum/post/15563061


On the label it says Mineral Wool 1200.


Please dont tell me it's the wrong stuff

You got the good stuff.



There are some different densities available for this product, but they are relatively light weight. The data I have for them looks quite good -- equivalent to about the same thickness of semi-rigid fiberglass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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Originally Posted by dknightd /forum/post/15561759


IMO thick panels are always better than thin panels. I prefer a few thick panels in proper places. Most any room benefits from 4" (or thicker panels) at the first reflection points. And big thick piles in as many corners as possible. You can over deaden a room by using too many panels. But it almost impossible to have too many thick piles, and if you do find yourself with too many you can put some of them in a thin plastic bag to reflect the highs.


Thank you very much for the info. That helps. So really thicker ones are better than thinner ones, especially in the corners and first reflection points. And to match the look of it - I could do all the panels I'm planning and if it sounds dead, either replace some of them with batting or wrap them in plastic before the fabric?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Montlick /forum/post/15563299


You got the good stuff.



There are some different densities available for this product, but they are relatively light weight. The data I have for them looks quite good -- equivalent to about the same thickness of semi-rigid fiberglass.

whew!! Thank you
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shawnwalters /forum/post/15558605


I am building my theater room out and have a build thread started, but I've run into some questions about acoustic panels and want to be sure I don't do too many panels and make it "dead".

As with salt and pepper, just add to taste.



Unlike salt and pepper, I would believe that it would be very difficult to overdo it with an HT room.


HT rooms are desired to be very dead.


There are folks who are using on the order of 40 traps for their room. Including deadening the entire front wall, if not ceiling too. If I did my HT all over again, I think I might've made it easier to deaden the whole wall behind my screen. Dunno. Maybe some false wall type of thingy.


I've never been interested in diffusion for some reason. I just use broadband absorption. I was briefly interested in acoustical cotton for a strange application, at the recommendation of craig john. Diffusers need enough space to, well, diffuse properly, and they are often very expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by jostenmeat /forum/post/15566384


As with salt and pepper, just add to taste.



Unlike salt and pepper, I would believe that it would be very difficult to overdo it with an HT room.


HT rooms are desired to be very dead.


There are folks who are using on the order of 40 traps for their room. Including deadening the entire front wall, if not ceiling too. If I did my HT all over again, I think I might've made it easier to deaden the whole wall behind my screen. Dunno. Maybe some false wall type of thingy.


I've never been interested in diffusion for some reason. I just use broadband absorption. I was briefly interested in acoustical cotton for a strange application, at the recommendation of craig john. Diffusers need enough space to, well, diffuse properly, and they are often very expensive.

Thanks for the info
 
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