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I have Klipsch Quintet III as my four surround speakers in my 7.1 set up. The specs say that they are rated for 50 watts(200 peak). I recently was able to get an open box Denon 3310 for $340, i just couln't pass it up. My mains, center, and sub can handle th 120 output of the 3310, but I am nervous about the quintet's. Do i need to go get new surrounds.
 

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Not if you be carefull and don't overdrive the speakers. It isn't so much power that blow's speakers as it is distortion. So be sensible and you should be fine. I have surrounds that are rated for 100w and the amp I use to run them does 300w per channel and I have run them that way for over a year now without a problem.
 

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High watt but low current- can you please explain what this means to someone just learning. What way does current impact things? Is low watt but high current preferable to high watt but low current? Thanks.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tongr /forum/post/18150538


High watt but low current- can you please explain what this means to someone just learning. What way does current impact things? Is low watt but high current preferable to high watt but low current? Thanks.

Most AVRs can't effectively drive 4 ohm loads as it requires more current (and wattage) than they are generally rated to deliver. If your speakers are 8 ohm nominal or highly efficient 4 ohms (greater than 90 dB/w/m) then you are ok.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tongr /forum/post/18163661


Sorry to be a pest but, please explain further, how is a 120 wpc receiver still low current? And what constitutes high current- how will I be able to tell?

Current is like amperage in electricity. You need amperage to make things happen. Static electricity is about 30,000 volts but the amperage is so tiny it's harmless. Wattage is the voltage and current is the amperage.


High current amps like Halo, Krell, Classe' and other can peak at 45 amps of current. Watts are cheap to produce.
 

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Speakers are driven by current, which is why they are used with AMPlifiers...not WATTlifiers.


Okay, I made that up. Weak sauce.


Most receivers, in their quest not to explode in a fireball, limit current as the impedance goes down. That's why a really good 120 watt separate amp will play much louder than a typical Nancy-Boy 120-watt receiver, especially into 4 ohms. The reason receivers are measured in watts goes way back to the static testing of the '40s and '50s. Receivers are tested to see how much heat they can generate into a load resistor rather than how they can drive a real-world complex load like a speaker.
 

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Ok, I'm getting what you're telling me... sort of. So are you saying that there may be some amps/receivers that have low wattage ratings that can drive speakers better or achieve louder output than higher wattage speakers? BTW, I already know this is true for some companies with questionable wattage ratings as compared to those with conservative ratings but I thought this disparity was not really a consideration with the better manufacturers like Dennon/Marantz/Onkyo/Yamaha. If this is the case, how do I tell what devices have decent current output. I had been looking at wattage, all channels driven- 8 ohm output compared to 4 ohm output- and THD as the criteria to consider for decent wattage production. Are there other telltale signs or specifications to look for or are only certain other manufacturers considered as "high current"? Thanks again.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagorep /forum/post/18163976


Current is like amperage in electricity. You need amperage to make things happen. Static electricity is about 30,000 volts but the amperage is so tiny it's harmless. Wattage is the voltage and current is the amperage.

Ok I have a degree in electronics. Amperage is the term used for electrical current. Voltage is the term used for electromotive force. Wattage is the term used for power. Watts equals amps(current) multiplied by volts(electromotive force).


Ohm's law: I=amperes, E=volts, R=resistance, P=watts


I=E/R, R=E/I, E=I X R, P=I X E
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagorep /forum/post/18163976


Current is like amperage in electricity. You need amperage to make things happen. Static electricity is about 30,000 volts but the amperage is so tiny it's harmless. Wattage is the voltage and current is the amperage.


High current amps like Halo, Krell, Classe' and other can peak at 45 amps of current. Watts are cheap to produce.

Wattage is the product of voltage and current: P = E * I (Watt's law)


You never have too much current, because high current won't be supplied to your speakers unless they draw it, that is, unless they present a low-impedance load to the amplifier. That's Ohm's law (transposed for current): I = E/R. If "R" (resistance) is low, then "I" (current draw) will be high (to the extent that the output device can supply it). Keep in mind, though, that speaker impedance varies with frequency, and speakers' impedance ratings (typically 8 ohms) are nominal values. Some speakers can hit dangerously low impedances at certain frequencies, but few actually do.


The original question was whether his receiver's amp has too much power for his speakers, and the answer is no. Too much available power is almost never a problem, as driving an amp into clipping (resulting in wave compression and, ironically, excessive average power levels) is what's most likely to damage speakers. A big amp is less likely to clip. It's possible to overdrive speakers with gobs of clean power, but, as modern ported speakers have sensitivity ratings around 90 dB or so (typically much higher for horn-drivin units like Klipsch), it'd probably be insanely loud.


Finally, remember this: The vast majority of listening occurs at one or two watts. So relax.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dookie1 /forum/post/18168977


can i have too much power?


that's like asking 'can i have too many (much) friends/money/sex?'


of course not.

^lol


I think i know the answer to my question now, but i am going to ask it anyways



i am waiting on the arrival of my Pioneer Elite VSX-23TXH (110 Watts x 7 Direct Energy Amplification(20Hz - 20kHz, 8 ohms, 0.09% THD - FTC)). I will be buying the SVS STS-01 5.1 speaker package here in about a month. In the mean time i plan on using my Logitech Z-5500 speakers (69 watts RMS (into 8 ohms, @ 1kHz, @ 10% THD), Maximum SPL: >115 dB, Signal to noise ratio: >93.5 dB, typical 100, Input impedance: 8 ohms).


After reading this thread, it appears as though i will be fine using the pioneer to power these speakers. Is that a correct assumption?
 

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OK, so high current is desirable. How do I determine if a receiver/amp I'm looking at delivers sufficient current. What specific specifications are indicative of current production? Thanks again, I really do appreciate your time and responses.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tongr /forum/post/18170304


OK, so high current is desirable. How do I determine if a receiver/amp I'm looking at delivers sufficient current. What specific specifications are indicative of current production? Thanks again, I really do appreciate your time and responses.

An easy rule is to look for 4u power ratings. If they don't bother to rate the amp at 4u, it's likely not going to deliver much current. A perfectly efficient amp will deliver 2x the power at 4u as it will at 8u, and those are rate. If an amp can deliver 1.5x the power at 4u as at 8u, it's a pretty good amp and worthy of consideration. Don't expect to get a "cheap" AVR with 4u power ratings.
 
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