AVS Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been told that the burner in the XS35 has a short life expectancy. Not sure what this translates to in hours. Does anyone have any experience with roughly how long (hours) of burning can one expect?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by plplplpl /forum/post/15431987


Mine crapped out within less than a year. In terms of hours, I would have to guess under 50. Not easy to replace .

Thanks for the reply,plplplpl, and for the link. Very informative. You've helped me before and I appreciate it.

I've had mine about a year and a half, with about 100 burn hours on it. I'm just trying to find out whether or not I should ease off on how much I should burn. Sounds like I should be more selective, as the burn life may be coming to an end. Are 50 to 100 burn hours normal? Those hours don't sound like a lot.


Anyone else with some numbers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,311 Posts
Toshiba XS burners are the biggest roll of the dice imaginable. Some last for years, many last mere months, and most fail suddenly for no apparent reason. These are phenomenal recorders let down by Toshiba fitting the junkiest possible burners to them. Not a good bet as a used item.


Since you already have yours, and it works, it should keep on working (at least for awhile). There is no correlation between number of discs burned and burner failure: as many drives fail from disuse as from hard use. Statistically, the best way to stretch Toshiba durability is to avoid R/W media and stick to write-once DVD-R instead, preferably the 8x-rated speed like Taiyo Yuden and Verbatim DataLife. Most Toshiba failures occur with excessive R/W reuse, and from struggling to burn current cheap incompatable 16x DVD-R like TDK or Nexxtech.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts
I must be feeling lucky , because I just pulled the trigger on a second RD-XS35 off of, well, you know the place .



The price was about what I'd be willing to gamble on this excellent machine with the Achilles' heel of a burner. It was just delivered a day or two ago and I'm in the midst of putting it through its paces. So far, it's doing fine, downloaded all the TVGOS data correctly and has executed a couple of timed recordings. Capture from a DV cam via firewire also went well, including automatically setting the correct 16:9 flag for a widescreen capture. The sophisticated editing features seem to work OK. This machine is king of the hill for picture quality.



Then came the all-important burning test. The seller's description read,
Quote:
It is 100% working. It plays and records DVD-R, DVD-RW DVD, DVD-RAM perfectly.

and out of 5 burns so far, one failed to finalize beyond 83%, but after the XS35 ended the process with an Error-14 message, the disc played OK in another standalone and on a computer. The other discs I burned before and after that one burned without error and play fine. So like Inspector Callahan, I'm hoping, in all this excitement, that this baby won't fire any blanks.


There's another guy selling an RD-XS35 on that auction site , but caveat emptor, it doesn't include the remote, without which the machine is virtually inoperable. There's nothing wrong per se with selling a machine without a remote, as long as you're upfront and clear about it. Buried in his stock product description, which BTW mentions what you can do "with a few simple clicks of the player's remote control," is an ambiguous section that says,
Quote:
What's in the Box (not Original Package)

DVD recorder with 160 GB hard drive

Only by asking him did he come clean about the remote not being included. Without a remote, even I wouldn't offer more than $50 for it, and I'm as much of a fanboy for this machine, burner notwithstanding, as Wajo is for the Philips or CitiBear for the Pioneer. At least this other guy is clear about no remote, although it sports suspicious-lookling Japanese on its back panel.



So far I'm thrilled with my relatively well-functioning second RD-XS35, not the least of which reasons is the opportunity to try out what for me is a cool new feature .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear /forum/post/15436153


Toshiba XS burners are the biggest roll of the dice imaginable. Some last for years, many last mere months, and most fail suddenly for no apparent reason. These are phenomenal recorders let down by Toshiba fitting the junkiest possible burners to them. Not a good bet as a used item.


Since you already have yours, and it works, it should keep on working (at least for awhile). There is no correlation between number of discs burned and burner failure: as many drives fail from disuse as from hard use. Statistically, the best way to stretch Toshiba durability is to avoid R/W media and stick to write-once DVD-R instead, preferably the 8x-rated speed like Taiyo Yuden and Verbatim DataLife. Most Toshiba failures occur with excessive R/W reuse, and from struggling to burn current cheap incompatable 16x DVD-R like TDK or Nexxtech.

Great information! Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear /forum/post/15436153


Statistically, the best way to stretch Toshiba durability is to avoid R/W media and stick to write-once DVD-R instead, preferably the 8x-rated speed like Taiyo Yuden and Verbatim DataLife. Most Toshiba failures occur with excessive R/W reuse, and from struggling to burn current cheap incompatable 16x DVD-R like TDK or Nexxtech.

I'm intrigued by the -RW comment. It's the first time I've heard this. I'd be interested in knowing what, from a technical point of view, would make -RW more likely to cause burner failures than plain vanilla -Rs. The extent of my understanding of the difference is that -R is a dye and -RW is a reflective layer, but that's as much as I know and I can't understand how a laser would blow out faster trying to burn one rather than the other. Hmm, you may be on to something here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,087 Posts
I, too, am a big fanboy of the Toshiba units. I have the XS-35 and 55 and love them - primarily for the great picture quality and great disk menus as well as many other cool features. On my 35 I began having trouble recording RAM discs after a year or so and I have recorded only DVD-R since (TY 8X mostly) and have had no problems with them (knock on wood), though I do not record extensively much anymore on these units, using them mostly for things like live concerts or special shows.


The XS-35 and 55 are truly great machines and probably two of the best all around ever made. I use my XS-35 mainly as a DVR these days. I also have the old D-R5 which is also a great machine. (And the D-R400 - not as good build quality as the older machines, but cheaper and still a nice unit.)


They all make disks w/good PQ. Only my old Sony HX-900 beats (or ties) them, but it has rather pedestrian disk menus by comparison and no comparable editing features. The XS-35/55 can edit almost as good as on a PC once you learn it's quirky system.


They've been hard to come by in the past, so nice to see some coming up for sale here lately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,700 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by plplplpl /forum/post/15453065


I'm intrigued by the -RW comment. It's the first time I've heard this. I'd be interested in knowing what, from a technical point of view, would make -RW more likely to cause burner failures than plain vanilla -Rs.

I've also read this point although I can't pinpoint exactly where. I believe it has to due with the smaller differences between ON and OFF (reflectivity) between the RWs and the regular Rs. The belief is the reader has to try harder to read the RWs and this in turn causes more wear on the laser.

Personally I've logged ~1000 of hours of -RW use on my oldest Panny DVDR (ES-30v) as well as ~1000 hours of regular -R use and it shows no sign of drive failure. Although I suppose one could argue Panny drives aren't nearly as prone to burner failure than the classic Toshibas, it's just hard to say. Erroring on the side of caution, and since the Toshibas have a HDD, I'd be inclined to timeshift to the HDD and then just archive to Rs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,311 Posts
The "R/W vs R" issue has two components: one is that circa-2004/2005 recorders in general seemed to have a higher-than average burner failure rate with heavy R/W use, and the other is that Toshibas of that period had a *particularly* hard time with R/W. This data is reflected in the many complaint posts here, at repair sites, and other forums. The point in mentioning it again is not to bash either R/W or Toshiba recorders, but to advise there is a potential issue, and if you love your Toshiba XS you can prolong its burner durability by avoiding R/W media as much as possible. This should not be hard to do, since the machines have convenient hard drives for temporary recordings or timeshifting, making R/W redundant for many purposes anyway.


Most of the burner failure reports I've seen mention near-exclusive use of R/W media, often the same set of two or three discs used repeatedly every day for several months. This is a just plain bad idea with vintage recorders, which were designed around the assumption you would probably use the hard drive for most recordings. Newer machine designs, from 2006 on, take into account consumer data showing people overwhelmingly choose R/W media regardless of actual need. Most newer machines also do not have hard drives and are better engineered for sturdier R/W handling. Even so, if your newer machine can use DVD-RAM, you should go with that for daily time-shift use. There is some strange unpredictable interaction between frequent R/W erasure and a great many recorder burners that does not occur with DVD-RAM. R/W seems happiest when limited to a dozen or so re-uses.


There are certain things that people "demand" from their DVD recorders that over time have proved to be unrealistic expectations, given that the machines don't sell well and especially don't sell at the prices required to implement some of these expectations reliably. One major bugaboo is the "one-stop media machine" fantasy. Do not believe the "jukebox" hype, do not expect the USB ports on these things to be as flexible as the ports on your PC. The other major "gotcha" is the habit many advanced users have of using a DVD recorder for convenient timeshifting onto DVD-R/W, then putting the R/W into their PC to rip the video and re-author it, expecting to re-use the R/W countless times. While this works, it doesn't work forever: be aware that the burners in standalone recorders have an average 30-40% life expectancy compared to the burners in a PC, even less with frequent use of R/W. Either feed your PC directly with a TV signal, or use easily-replaced DVD recorder models at the head end. Using a Toshiba XS or Pioneer 520 for constant R/W is asking for trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,234 Posts
Does RW reading/writing use a higher intensity laser setting? That would have been my guess wrt accelerated failure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I must be feeling lucky, because I just pulled the trigger on a second RD-XS35 off of, well,you know the place.


The price was about what I'd be willing to gamble on this excellent machine with the Achilles' heel of a burner. It was just delivered a day or two ago and I'm in the midst of putting it through its paces. So far, it's doing fine, downloaded all the TVGOS data correctly and has executed a couple of timed recordings. Capture from a DV cam via firewire also went well, including automatically setting the correct 16:9 flag for a widescreen capture. The sophisticated editing features seem to work OK. This machine is king of the hill for picture quality.


Then came the all-important burning test. The seller's description read, Quote: It is 100% working. It plays and records DVD-R, DVD-RW DVD, DVD-RAM perfectly.


and out of 5 burns so far, one failed to finalize beyond 83%, but after the XS35 ended the process with an Error-14 message, the disc played OK in another standalone and on a computer. The other discs I burned before and after that one burned without error and play fine. So like Inspector Callahan, I'm hoping, in all this excitement, that this baby won't fire any blanks.


There's another guy selling an RD-XS35 on that auction site, but caveat emptor, it doesn't include the remote, without which the machine is virtually inoperable. There's nothing wrong per se with selling a machine without a remote, as long as you're upfront and clear about it. Buried in his stock product description, which BTW mentions what you can do "with a few simple clicks of the player's remote control," is an ambiguous section that says, Quote: What's in the Box (not Original Package)
DVD recorder with 160 GB hard drive


Only by asking him did he come clean about the remote not being included. Without a remote, even I wouldn't offer more than $50 for it, and I'm as much of a fanboy for this machine, burner notwithstanding, as Wajo is for the Philips or CitiBear for the Pioneer. At leastthis other guy is clear about no remote, although it sports suspicious-lookling Japanese on its back panel.


So far I'm thrilled with my relatively well-functioning second RD-XS35, not the least of which reasons is the opportunity to try out what for me is a cool new feature.
I have been burning DVD's for years. Not a single problem!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top