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Discussion Starter #1
Hello


I have just started building base cabinets for my bar and everything was going really well until I got to the face frame. I am using 3/4" solid oak stock to make the face frames. I have drilled pocket holes with a pocket hole jig but when I try to screw the face frame together some of the screws break and others seem as if they are stripped.


I am using the screws that were supplied with the pocket hole jig.


What am I doing wrong? Any help would be appreciated.


Eric.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info. I will go to do hardware store to buy better screws. This is the first cabinet I have made and the pocket hole screws worked well for the plywood but I ran into problems when I tried to build the face frame.


What a disappointment but it makes sense that the screws that came with the pocket hole jig are not the best quality. Hope it works better tomorrow.


Thanks


Eric
 

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Get High-Quality robertson head screws. Philips and/or Flat-head screws won't handle the torque when fastening hard woods.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Heff


I just got back from the hardware store with new screws and they worked like a charm.


A note to anyone building their own cabinets and using pocket holes to hide the screws.

There are two types of pocket screws (that I know of at the moment), one has coarse thread which is ideal for plywood and softwoods. The other has fine thread and is recommended for use with hardwoods. They are both self drilling like a machine screw.


Thanks for getting me on the right track Big Mouth in DC and I hope that my findings will save others some aggrevation as well.


Thanks again


Eric
 

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There's a few pages about screw selection in the the K3 Jig manual (PDF) . Here's the list of screw types that Kreg offers:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kreg Manual /forum/post/0


We offer three thread types, two head styles and five different lengths to handle nearly all pocket hole applications.


A fine-thread screw is used any time you're driving the screw into a hardwood (i.e., oak, maple, walnut, cherry, hickory, etc.) The coarse-thread screw has a larger thread diameter and provides greater holding power when driving a screw into soft material such as plywood, particle board, MDF, melamine, and pine. We also offer a Hi-Lo thread type which consists of two separate threads, one higher than the other that serves as a general purpose screw in medium hardwoods like poplar. The Hi-Lo screw is only offered in the 1-1/4 length.


The washer head (SML) screw is our most popular head style as it provides the largest amount of surface area to seat firmly in the bottom of the pocket. Available in both fine or coarse thread, this head style is highly recommended if the material the pocket is drilled into is soft such as plywood or pine. The large washer head assures that the screw is not overdriven in the bottom of the pocket.


The second available head style is the pan head (SPS). The pan head is slightly smaller in both head and shank diameter than the washer head screw and is a good alternative to the washer head screw if both mating workpieces are made of extremely hard woods. The pan head style is also of benefit in the 1 length as it allows one to join 1/2 and 5/8 stock and easily seat the screw head below flush.


There are five thread lengths most commonly used in pocket hole joinery; 1, 1-1/4, 1-1/2, 2, and 2-1/2.
 

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When using screws, any type of screws, in hardwood, there are three steps to easy driving.


1a screw intended for solid wood


2 a correctly sized pilot hole


3 lube the screw with paste wax (best) or even oil rubbed from the side of your nose.


You should never need so much torque that you snap the screw. Screws come in several alloys, including some with hardened threads. These can be brittle. But a pilot hole and lube will let you drive almost any screw, including brass screws.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by trekguy /forum/post/13069862


But a pilot hole and lube will let you drive almost any screw, including brass screws.

One thing about Kreg's pocket hole tooling is that it really assumes self-drilling screws. Their drill bits and jigs only create a very shallow pilot hole, basically just enough to aim the screw in the right direction. They intentionally don't usually even penetrate all the way through the first piece of wood (this is to avoid creating a burr around the exit hole that might get in the way of a tight join).
 

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I've never used one of those jigs, although I've assembled some face frames with screws and plugs when dowels were not on hand, and I would have thought that self-drilling or not, that without a pilot hole there would be a risk of splitting with some hardwoods.


I checked out the Kreg site and to my surprise they claim that their small shank self tapping screws will not split any hardwood.


The company says this about breaking off the screw heads:

If you are having problems with the head breaking off in a box of KREG Pocket Hole Screws please let us know so we may make it right with you.



This sounds like a tool I need to put on my list.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
trekguy


I've bought the Kreg pocket hole screws and they do work like a charm. Keep in mind though that the fine thread type is used for hardwoods and the coarse thread type is ideal for softwoods and plywood.


Eric
 
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