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Hi, I hope I am posting this in the right forum.

I am having a problem with my DVD/VHS combo recorder unit. It is a JVC model DR-MV100B. My unit is 6 years old (relatively young, IMO...I plunk down $200 for a device like this, I would hope for it to last a bit longer). At that age, it's, of course, no longer under warranty. Normally, when you turn the unit on, it says "HELLO" on the display for, around, 30 seconds while it boots up. Boot up completes, and it is ready to use. Now, for some reason, it is failing to, fully, power up. I'm pressing the power button, it switches on, says "HELLO" on the display. Then, after at least 30 seconds, it shuts itself off, never completing the boot-up process. I have tried resetting the unit per the manufacturer's instructions as well as unplugging it for a short while, then, plugging it in again and trying to power up. The problem still persists. Can anyone suggest what the issue might be? Thanks.
 

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I don't have a JVC but from your description it sounds like a classic example of failing electrolytic capacitors in the power supply.
Your correct in that 6 years for a piece of electronics isn't too much to expect but mfgs. try and cut corners everywhere they can and unfortunately electrolytic capacitors seem to be a favorite place to cut. It's really a disgusting thing to do when you think of all the failed electronics that end up in the trash(or hopefully recycled) every year because the mfgs. want to save a few pennies but IMO they figure they will make it past the warranty and after that your on your own :mad:
The sad part is it's truly only pennies but when they make 1,000,000's every penny counts. Properly designed capacitors have the ability to last 20+ years but IMO if things lasted that long people wouldn't be back for products in 5 or 6 years......
It's not just JVC but almost every brand including the brand I mainly use, Panasonic suffers from premature capacitor failure. Replacement parts are cheap and readily available but the work of taking the machine apart and soldering in new caps is more than most want to bother with. AFA spotting the bad caps, look for the larger tin can caps and ones with bulging or swollen tops are a sure sign of failure. Generally the power supply has less than a half dozen of the large ones, replacing them all when you have it apart might not be a bad idea as they will all probably start failing in due time :(
 
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