AVS Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
724 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
Quick question . I know lcds loose brightness over time. After 6 years ( which is how old mine is), is it a good idea to slightly increase the brightness setting to get closer to where it was 6 years ago when it was perfectly calibrated?

Many thx
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,322 Posts
Hello all,
Quick question . I know lcds loose brightness over time. After 6 years ( which is how old mine is), is it a good idea to slightly increase the brightness setting to get closer to where it was 6 years ago when it was perfectly calibrated?
No, the Brightness setting actually adjusts the black level (too low and blacks lose shadow detail, too high and the black areas get washed out). It's counter-intuitive, but that's the way it's always been on TVs.

The Contrast setting (sometimes called Picture) is what adjusts the screen brightness, and most LCD TVs also have a backlight setting that also adjusts screen brightness.


______________________________
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
724 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Randy,
Thx. That's actually what I meant. .. backlight . Is turning it up a bit from my original calibrated settings worth after 6 years to compensate for lost brightness over that time .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
Hi Randy,
Thx. That's actually what I meant. .. backlight . Is turning it up a bit from my original calibrated settings worth after 6 years to compensate for lost brightness over that time .
I have found that to work for an old CCFL Toshiba.

You might need to do a white-temperature adjustment,
especially with white LED backlighting -- the blue gets too intense
as the phosphors for the red and green age...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
903 Posts
I have found that to work for an old CCFL Toshiba.

You might need to do a white-temperature adjustment,
especially with white LED backlighting -- the blue gets too intense
as the phosphors for the red and green age...
There are no phosphors with LED / LCD's. The only thing that's aging is the led backlight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
There are no phosphors with LED / LCD's. The only thing that's aging is the led backlight.
White LEDs are actually blue LEDs with a yellow phosphor coating.
Look at the lighting department of a hardware store and see the yellow.
The yellow phosphor covers the long wavelengths of red and green.
The phosphor is excited by the short wavelength blue LED, much like
a fluorescent tube is excited by the UV light from the mercury vapor.

LEDs are usually much more durable than phosphors, so the red and
green willl dim relative to the blue over time...
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top