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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought I'd open a build thread for the TV stand I will be making. The TV I have is a rear projection, 82 inch DLP TV. I was not ablt to find a stand suitable for this size of a TV. As such, I will be making one.


I will be using MDF primarily. It will requires less than two full 4X8 sheets. Attached is a picture showing the raw materials.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Attached are the core parts, rough-cut to size.


The front of the stand will be elliptical, and follow the natural curves of the TV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
These are the two vertical supports on the outer edges of the stand. I am adding an extra layer of MDF along the edges for added strength.


The outer verticals shown here are glued and clamped up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Not much in the way of plans for this project. I've done a ton of this type of thing before, so I did not go overboard on drafting up plans.


The core dimensions are that it be 73 inches in length to be flush with the length of the TV. Depth needs to be 20 to 24 inches, height needs to be 17 to 20 inches, Center shelf needs to be >32 inches to fit my center channel, the ellipse will have an eccentricity of .943. That's all I know dimension-wise gonig in. Attached are my "plans."
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'll be using biscuits to strengthen the jointery. Shown is my biscuit jointer, and some of the vertical support ready for notching.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkmoon77 /forum/post/19508788


All the verticals glued and clamped.


Like I said, you can never have too many clamps.

Will you make me one for my 82738?


Just 10 to 12" high, no shelfs need.

Needs to be 24" deep, to accommodate my Bose Center speaker in front of it.

Also I have mine in a corner, so some cut rear corners would help some to put it almost flush(leave a few inches)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That sounds like a fairly simple design, you should have a go of it. If you lack some of the tools, the big-box stores can do much of the cutting for you, especially if you are working with dimensions like that.


The work I did above represents about 3 to 4 hours of work, and most of that was because of the curved front. It really does go fast, and can be a fun weekend project for you.


I'll post more pics soon as I plan to assemble the main carcass tonight. Once the glue dries, it's time for finishing. Prep, paint, wait, and repeat, then repeat, then repeat...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkmoon77 /forum/post/19509799


That sounds like a fairly simple design, you should have a go of it. If you lack some of the tools, the big-box stores can do much of the cutting for you, especially if you are working with dimensions like that.


The work I did above represents about 3 to 4 hours of work, and most of that was because of the curved front. It really does go fast, and can be a fun weekend project for you.


I'll post more pics soon as I plan to assemble the main carcass tonight. Once the glue dries, it's time for finishing. Prep, paint, wait, and repeat, then repeat, then repeat...

lol, I'm a retired accountant (CPA) & I'm much better with my mind than my hands.
Although I'm slipping on both of those as I go along on this "aging process" path.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobs10 /forum/post/19519113


How did you create the smooth arc on the front of the MDF panels?

I drew it out with a trammel of Archimedes. (Major axis at 12 feet, minor access at 4 feet).


I cut it out with a jigsaw.


I sanded it smooth with a straight-line sander to get out any imperfections from the jigsaw.


To ensure uniformity, I did all three pieces at the same time. They were temporarily nailed together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I didn't have as much time this weekend as I had hoped, but I was able to make some progress.


All biscuit slots are cut. Hopefully everything lines up during the dry fit.

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This is the hardware that will support the front portion of the long middle shelf. I used a steel angle iron, and threaded dowels as MDF won't hold any hardware though it's edges.


Both a slot for the angle iron, the threaded dowel, and the screw holes had to be drilled and line up. I will be using four of these total.


I also cut the shelf pins from 1/4 inch steel rod.


 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
In effort to keep the stand height as low as possible, I will be using very small casters. (I didn't want casters at all, but soon realized that fully loaded, the stand will be supporting over 450 pounds). There are a lot of smaller casters to be able to support the required weight.


I also glued up false feet along the front edge to hide the wheels.

 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Finally, I installed the trim along the front edges and shelves.


The carcass is now complete, and in the white. I should have time this week to sand and seal the raw edges. If I can get the prep work done, I'll be able to start spraying the primer and paint next weekend.


 

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Thanks for the response. The cabinet looks very nice. Any reason to use biscuits over say a dado and tenon? I guess with the strength of today's glues it probably doesn't make much difference which way you go?


It's been a very, very long time since conics in high school, but If I remember correctly, I can get an elipse using just a string? I really like the rounded front so I'll probably do the same if I can figure out how. I'll probably make up a MDF pattern and then just copy the arc onto the pieces using a router.


I take it you will be doing a high gloss finish? Please go into detail about how you finish the cabinet as that is usally the most difficult part of wood working projects.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobs10 /forum/post/19531320


Thanks for the response. The cabinet looks very nice. Any reason to use biscuits over say a dado and tenon? I guess with the strength of today's glues it probably doesn't make much difference which way you go?

I don't find that there is much difference in strength between dado and biscuits over long lengths, though I'd use biscuits for short runs. (By the way, biscuits are often misunderstood, and there is a very technical reason why they are so strong - basically, people think of them in terms of shear strength, but the reality is, if the vertical got pushed side-to-side, the biscuit would want to slip out. Just try to pull out a glued biscuit! You don't have to worry about a biscuit failing from shear stress, as you have the whole glue joint for that). Anyway, I use biscuits over dados for several reasons:


1. Less sawdust.

2. Ease of cutting. Imagine tring to cut dados both width and length wise on those seven foot sections. And I hate making cuts I can't see.

3. Everthing self aligns and the pieces mate nearly perfectly. Dado cuts rely on the accuracy of your ruler, the biscuit jointer's fence system does the alignment for you.

4. You just can't do a dado for partial length pieces without having to do a lot of notching. Some of the verticals stop halfway through the horizontals. If you stop a dado halfway through a board, your stuck with the curve of the saw blade sticking out. If you stop it shy of the edge, then you have to notch the edges. Too much of a hastle for me.

5. Ease of measuring. If you want a 12 inch vertical, cut 12 inches. You don't have to allow for the depth of the dado, and then find out that it cut just a bit to deep or shallow, resulting in a change of height.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobs10 /forum/post/19531320


It's been a very, very long time since conics in high school, but If I remember correctly, I can get an elipse using just a string? I really like the rounded front so I'll probably do the same if I can figure out how. I'll probably make up a MDF pattern and then just copy the arc onto the pieces using a router.

True, if you know the focci. I did not. String works reasonably well for small ellipses, but over large ellipses, the elasticity of the string will be very problamatic. Even if you used steel wire, it is hard to keep the pen perpendicular. A trammel of Archimedes workes great, is very precise, and you only need a yard stick or similar scrap of wood to do it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ar...es_Trammel.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobs10 /forum/post/19531320


I take it you will be doing a high gloss finish? Please go into detail about how you finish the cabinet as that is usally the most difficult part of wood working projects.

I will not do gloss, actually. I highly prefer satin around screens as I hate glare. The main reason I rejected plasma screens was due to screen glare. I had built speaker cabinets last year, and was happy with the finish. I will be matching those. Besides, the only visible part of the cabinet will be the thin front edges of the horizontals.


As for finish, I will be using an interior/exterior oil-based primer and paint. Sprayed with a HVLP gun.


The interior/exterior is cruicial as it prevents heavy objects from sticking on the shelves over time. The oil-based paint is just a bit tougher than acrylic, but truthfully, I am only using it becuase flat oil-based paint comes out "satiny" whereas flat water-based comes out looking somewhat unfinsihed or "powdery." I would have preferred a water-based satin paint (ease of cleanup, safer to spray) but I couldn't find any in-stock locally.
 
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