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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems like most doors today are prehung, so adjustment to a prehung door all seem to involve making sure the jamb is plumb and level. At least that seems to be the result of my investigation to date. I am hoping some of you with more carpentry / home building skill can advise me of a solution to my door issue.


I built a custom door for my theater. That is to say, I built a door, and I built a frame for it to go in, and then I hung the door with four exterior door (heavy duty) hinges. I did my best to ensure the door frame was level and plumb, and that the door was square. I did quite well in that regard, I believe. Alas, I hung the door, and it springs open to about 3 inches.


If I open the door any more than 3 inches, the door stays right where I open it to. If I open it 3 inches, it stays open 3 inches; if I open it 45 degrees, it stays open at 45 degrees; and so forth for any opening greater than about 3 inches. The door does not swing open or closed to any imaginary equilibrium point. Therefore, I am of the assumption that the door is quite level.


But when I close the door, it gives me some resistance, and it wants to spring open. My first thought is that a hinge mortise needs to be a little deeper; perhaps the hinges are not quite in alignment when they are closed, so one (or more of them) wants to spring back open. I was going to try to see if I can tell which hinge is springing open on me, but that might not be the issue at all.


My question for anyone with experience adjusting doors is whether there is a technique to adjusting a door with a problem like I described.


Thanks.
 

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sounds like it's hinge-bound


Stand on the hinge pin side of the door and close it slowly. Watch the hinges as you close the door and you will likely find that they pull away from the jamb.


You may have mortised the hinges in too deep and the door is actually binding on the jamb


The dirty fix is to just shim the pin edge of the hinge either on the door or the frame with cardboard (not corrougated)


Problems can arrise if the door is actually too big for the frame - as you shim at the pin edge of the hinge, the door is moved toward the strike. you may end up needing to bevel the door on the strike side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, TJ.


It's amazing what the right search phrase will do for Yahoo/Google searches. I was not familiar with the term "hinge bound." If I had known that was what to call my problem, I might have been able to self diagnose the issue.


Looks like I will be busy studying and shimming door hinges this weekend ...
 
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