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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Getting ready to drywall my HT room. I think I read somewhere on this forum that you should leave a small gap between the drywall on the ceiling and the drywall on the wall. For expansion I guess. Has anyone heard that before? In the past I have tried to butt them up as close as possible. It always looked good when I finished but I never stuck around in the house for long enough to see any longer term problems. (I'm hoping that changes with this house).


2nd question - I plan on having someone do the mud and tape work. What is a fair price for a room 25' long x 12' 6" wide x 8' 4" tall? There are no soffits or anything like that so it's a pretty easy job. I know the cost will vary by area of the country but I thought I could get a rough idea. (I'm in Chattanooga, Tn)


Thanks. Bill
 

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1. From what I've read, some people will leave a small gap and fill it with acoustical caulk. Whether it helps a ton or not, I don't know. That being said, I'll probably do it because it seems reasonable to me. Leaving a gap allows you to "fill" the entire gap and seal it. Without the gap, the best you can do is put a thin layer of mud over it. Less man and less of a seal.... so I read.....


2. Not sure of the costs to finish it.
 

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You don't need a gap between the ceiling and wall drywall.


Cost for mudding might be around $200-300? That's a SWAG.
 

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What Jerrod said. For HT rooms, I think they recommend the gap for acoustical caulk and that way you're decoupling the ceiling from the walls for sound transfer. I think I read that in Clarence's thread. I don't think sheetorck expands, if it does. it's not much. We've always butted the walls to the ceiling and never had a problem with cracking seams or anything.


I've got a guy coming out to give me a mud estimate on Saturday, I'll let you know what I find out.


Bud
 

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Fletch,


Well, mud guy came. He wanted 2300.00 for mud, but that's the whole basement and only the ceiling in the HT room. He said I saved about 700 doing drywall myself, but mud would cost more because I used 8 foot sheets instead of 12 foot. More labor for the extra seems. Then he came down to 2150.00. He also said that the whole basement, including drywall would have cost about 3800.00. I tried to figure out how he estimated it and the best I can tell is figured on 80 his number) sheets to mud, so that equates to about 25.00 a sheet (labor) to mud and the rest is corner beads and mud. I may get one more estimate, but looks like I'll be doing it myself. Oh, and he told me that that 2150.00 included sanding and cleanup ("isn't that special" in by best Dana Carvey voice).


Bud
 

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I've heard from Ted White at audioalloy in recent phone conversations that you only need the space between the wall and the floor if you decouple the walls with RSIC - same goes for the ceiling to the wall. No RSIC, no gap.


Just passing some info



Gary
 

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Chinadog


Good drywall finishers go at about $ 200 to 250 a day in these parts. My project took about 7 man days and it ran $1350 including supplies for about a 1800 sq ft basement project.


The boss put in about 4 hours total, the main guy worked all 6 days (accompanied by loud classic rock) and two green carders showed up for an afternoon. Best money I spent. I would have probably taken over a month. Also so far the only labor I hired
 

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Bill while I've read the posts about leaving the 1/4 inch gap and then filling with goop for sound proofing reasons, I also have a book "professional drywall techniques" sitting on my book shelf.


In the book they talk about a preferred method of some drywallers to use a floating corner where the ceiling meets the wall. They recommend that to minimize future cracking at those corner joints to not fasten the ceiling drywall anywhere in the last 8 inches closet to the wall. Then to butt the wall panels up tight to the ceiling panels. (no concern for sound though)


I would think that if you are going to use wall treatments and moulding, cracking isn't an issue.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC
Chinadog


Good drywall finishers go at about $ 200 to 250 a day in these parts. My project took about 7 man days and it ran $1350 including supplies for about a 1800 sq ft basement project.


The boss put in about 4 hours total, the main guy worked all 6 days (accompanied by loud classic rock) and two green carders showed up for an afternoon. Best money I spent. I would have probably taken over a month. Also so far the only labor I hired
Is that drywall and mud? Sounds pretty cheap. I think I may get another quote then. I expected it to be two days and maybe 1K. Not sure how many people he was goin got have. Geez, I already did the first skim coat over the screw heads already, so all we're talking about is seams and cornerboard.


Bud
 

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about this gap -vs- non-gap...


on an RSIC assembly rigidly gluing the drywall to the floor wouldn't be good. putting it over some oozy-goozy ultra-soft acoustical caulk 1/4" thick might make for a fragile wall sensitive to being kicked or something.


using acoustical caulk under the drywall is a solid policy that should be observed. using acoustical caulk between wall and ceiling is a solid policy that should be observed.


however, floating the wallboard on a thick layer of caulk boils down to just another example of people over-fanaticizing about decoupling, and in the end it will not make a significant difference in the overall systems performance, and probably nearly no difference at low frequencies.


if it did make a difference at low frequencies, the reason would be that making the system very very non-rigid (like 1/4" of non-drying acoustical caulk letting everything move around to the max) would allow the low-frequency resonance to drop a bit in frequency.


because this stiffness (if applicable at all) at the edges of the panels is not a spring force in series with the clip and air cavity, it shouldn't affect decoupling point.



my honest opinion? if you built a lab to test this phenomenon, the leaving of massive crack and oozy goozy caulk bead -vs- not, you would find a 100% insignificant difference.


if you would please remember the basic lessons that i tried (and maybe poorly) to expound in the basement ceiling isolation thread this last week, they can save you an immense immense amount of pain.


rubber washers here and there, caulk beads (assuming its sealed well regardless of which method you use) of various sizes, irky-quirky schemes involving beads of caulk under everything in site to "decouple" it...


will never add up to anything more than largish amounts of labor for nuttin


worry about the big things.


Brian
 

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Brian

I was just looking for your links to post here. I have reread them a few times, (It will take more than a few readings to digest, for us mere mortals) and would highly recommend them. How do we get a tread made into a sticky. Does it take a lot of people pestering an admin? I think I'm gonna go give Brian's thread a shameless bump!


Skipp
 

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China: I did the hanging and it practically killed me even with a lift. But I was able to do 10 ft 5/8 sheets myself, and 12 ft 1/2 inch sheets. Thats off my pick-up, in the door and on the ceiling without even the misses.


I opted to do the hanging after I got a bid of $13,000 from one guy and the other never called with his bid (must have freaked when I handed him a copy of how RC is supposed to be installed).


When I finally found the guy to just tape, mud and sand I got the impression his price would have been more reasonable. Around here the drywall guys are picking their jobs.


I got a guy who I suspect used AA as his source of workers.
 

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One thing I never understood with home theater construction is getting detailed with finishing the drywall. Why bother with sanding down the mud to a fine finish if your just going to cover it with fabric and linacoustic etc. Maybe I am missing something here, but why not just put a coat of mud and tape up and just sand the rough parts down. If no one is going to see it who cares. I have finished tons of drywall myself and it is not that hard. I actually bought a drywall lift instead of paying someone to hang it. It was only 250$$, a lot better than the money to pay someone to do it.
 

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Big,


Thanks for the reply. I can relate, although it wasn't bad for me. I think since I've done it before, have the tools and it's significant enough cost savings, I went for it. As far as the mud, same situation, I'll go ahead and do it.


Paul,


Exactly, which is why I said 'ceiling' in the HT room. I'm actually doing the whole basement in one pop, but plan on GOM on the walls, so not too concerned about that room. Some people may not do fabric at all or just on the bottom half. I purchased my lift as well (ebay) and could not have done it without it. I already have someone lined up to buy it when I'm done.


Bud
 

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Paul you are absolutely right on the finishing. If all you are doing is a HT and the walls will get treatment why bother. Actually I have one wall that used to have a window that I just put two coats of mud on with a blade with a quick scrape between coats with the blade. No sense putting any more dust in the air, your HVAC ducts, or your lungs than you have to. The 1 inch wall treatments hide a multitude of sins.
 

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By the way... don't think the cleanup is really all that easy. I spent a complete day just dealing with the floor in my place. The guys "cleaned" it themselves but really didn't do a very good job. After they finished there was essentially a hardened layer of drywall dust from where they washed the floor. I scrubbed the thing three times before I was happy with the results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the replies guys. My mud/tape estimate came in at $400 which amounts to about $15 per sheet. I guess I'm lucky I live in Chattanooga.


Bill
 
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