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I have really been enjoying a recording of U2 Rattle & Hum from MHD. I like the music and I am very impressed by the artistic quality of the photography during the concert portions. I had a production process inquiry that some folks here may know the answer to. I have seen live productions going to air where the director chooses which camera shot goes to air. I am wondering if a similar process is used for concerts like this, where only one camera shot is ever recorded to a master. Or is it the case that many of the camera shots are recorded and then the editing is done later to pick a good assortment of shots? I realize that the answer could vary depending on the specific concert. Any insights by experts in the know are appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris_h2 /forum/post/14243925


I have really been enjoying a recording of U2 Rattle & Hum from MHD. I like the music and I am very impressed by the artistic quality of the photography during the concert portions. I had a production process inquiry that some folks here may know the answer to. I have seen live productions going to air where the director chooses which camera shot goes to air. I am wondering if a similar process is used for concerts like this, where only one camera shot is ever recorded to a master. Or is it the case that many of the camera shots are recorded and then the editing is done later to pick a good assortment of shots? I realize that the answer could vary depending on the specific concert. Any insights by experts in the know are appreciated. Thanks in advance.

For non-live events, multiple cameras are recorded and the final product is derived from them.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris_h2 /forum/post/14243925


I have really been enjoying a recording of U2 Rattle & Hum from MHD. I like the music and I am very impressed by the artistic quality of the photography during the concert portions. I had a production process inquiry that some folks here may know the answer to. I have seen live productions going to air where the director chooses which camera shot goes to air. I am wondering if a similar process is used for concerts like this, where only one camera shot is ever recorded to a master. Or is it the case that many of the camera shots are recorded and then the editing is done later to pick a good assortment of shots? I realize that the answer could vary depending on the specific concert. Any insights by experts in the know are appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Concerts are usually produced just like a live event with a director setting up shots and picking each camera to go to "air". In addition all the cameras are also recorded so they can be mixed in post production to fix any mistakes that happened live or to create a better final product.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris_h2 /forum/post/14243925


I have really been enjoying a recording of U2 Rattle & Hum from MHD. I like the music and I am very impressed by the artistic quality of the photography during the concert portions. I had a production process inquiry that some folks here may know the answer to. I have seen live productions going to air where the director chooses which camera shot goes to air. I am wondering if a similar process is used for concerts like this, where only one camera shot is ever recorded to a master. Or is it the case that many of the camera shots are recorded and then the editing is done later to pick a good assortment of shots? I realize that the answer could vary depending on the specific concert. Any insights by experts in the know are appreciated. Thanks in advance.

That's not a "recording." Rattle and Hum is a feature film. It was directed by Phil Joanou and released to theaters in the US in November, 1988. The process by which it was shot was, of course, vastly different than a live TV broadcast of a concert. Joanou shot on both 35MM and Super16 and then served as his own editor. The numbers of cameras used depended on the circumstance. For the concerts, not surprisingly, multiple cameras were used. Everything was shot in B&W except for the shows at the end of the tour in Tempe, Arizona, which is the footage in the stadium (Sun Devil Stadium) that you see in color towards the end of the film.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckytwn /forum/post/14244391


That's not a "recording." Rattle and Hum is a feature film. It was directed by Phil Joanou and released to theaters in the US in November, 1998. The process by which it was shot was, of course, vastly different than a live TV broadcast of a concert. Joanou shot on both 35MM and Super16 and then served as his own editor. The numbers of cameras used depended on the circumstance. For the concerts, not surprisingly, multiple cameras were used. Everything was shot in B&W except for the shows at the end of the tour in Arizona, which is the footage in the stadium that you see in color towards the end of the film.

Actually, it was 1988....but yeah...what he said...



edit - OK, I noticed you fixed that in the original post.



RATTLE & HUM was actually one of my "freebies" from Toshiba when I bought an HD DVD player. For years, all I had was the VHS version. In HD, one can see a lot of grain - but that was an artistic choice, so don't make me out to be complaining.
That's how it looked in the theater, too.


Audio-wise, the HD disc (as the equivalent BluRay would to) rocks.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwebb1970 /forum/post/14244407


Actually, it was 1988....but yeah...what he said...

Yeah, I caught that right as I posted and had already corrected by the time I saw your post. That's when I also added in the stadium info, figured I'd throw in some more info...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckytwn /forum/post/14244418


Yeah, I caught that right as I posted and had already corrected by the time I saw your post. That's when I also added in the stadium info, figured I'd throw in some more info...

And good info at that.


Saw them in Oakland on that tour (w/ The Pretenders opening!). Awesome show.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckytwn /forum/post/14244391


That's not a "recording." Rattle and Hum is a feature film.

Ok, so it's a recording of a feature film. I felt it was important to mention it being a recording since it is over three months old, and may or may not still be airing on MHD. That is good for other users to know, in case they want to check it out and can't find it in the guide.


Thanks for all the insights folks.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris_h2 /forum/post/14255207


Ok, so it's a recording of a feature film. I felt it was important to mention it being a recording since it is over three months old, and may or may not still be airing on MHD. That is good for other users to know, in case they want to check it out and can't find it in the guide.


Thanks for all the insights folks.

I meant it wasn't a recording in that it wasn't shot on video with a control truck, etc. Most of the responses in this thread were about that sort of concert recording. Keep in mind, you started this thread to ask about how Rattle & Hum was produced, which was as I noted a feature film. As a feature film, it was something totally different than a concert recording.
 

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I would consider a "Film" a "Recording." What I think you mean to say is that it wasn't a "Television (or Video) Production" either "Live" or "Pre-Recorded" with "Post Production."


Any process which somehow transfers an account of something live to some media, whether it be a piece of paper, canvas, acetate, film, vinyl, audio or videotape, a flash drive, CD, etc. is a "Recording."
 

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Originally Posted by mscottc /forum/post/14258854


I would consider a "Film" a "Recording." What I think you mean to say is that it wasn't a "Television (or Video) Production" either "Live" or "Pre-Recorded" with "Post Production."


Any process which somehow transfers an account of something live to some media, whether it be a piece of paper, canvas, acetate, film, vinyl, audio or videotape, a flash drive, CD, etc. is a "Recording."

Having just spent my day at one of the biggest post-houses in the world, I would have to say I don't agree with that in regards to industry terminology. Yes, film "records" a picture in a literal sense but nobody that I know of professionally refers to something being "recorded" when captured on film. It is "filmed", not "recorded".
 

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Modern music concerts captured on video often ISO record most if not all of the direct camera feeds as well as the main mixer-cut, allowing any "live cut" decisions to be altered in post.


I guess this may differ from a film shoot if the video assists from each film camera are not available centrally, and if each film camera operator is not able to be on talkback from the director? Also - AIUI some filmed concerts are captured across multiple events to allow for more angles? (Whereas with video capture it is more usual to capture everything in one go)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckytwn /forum/post/14263330


Yes, film "records" a picture in a literal sense but nobody that I know of professionally refers to something being "recorded" when captured on film. It is "filmed", not "recorded".

The terminology is starting to get confusing again with disk recording. People often say they "taped" a show on their Tivo. I want to ask them "Your Tivo uses tape?" but that could confuse them even more because for all they know, it might actually use tape.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl /forum/post/14268167


The terminology is starting to get confusing again with disk recording. People often say they "taped" a show on their Tivo. I want to ask them "Your Tivo uses tape?" but that could confuse them even more because for all they know, it might actually use tape.

Some phrases just never die, even after their application no longer applies...


I hear people say "dial" when referring to entering a phone number using a keypad everyday.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckytwn /forum/post/14256144


I meant it wasn't a recording in that it wasn't shot on video with a control truck, etc. Most of the responses in this thread were about that sort of concert recording. Keep in mind, you started this thread to ask about how Rattle & Hum was produced, which was as I noted a feature film. As a feature film, it was something totally different than a concert recording.

Thanks for that clarification, it helps.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jediphish /forum/post/14269179


Some phrases just never die, even after their application no longer applies...


I hear people say "dial" when referring to entering a phone number using a keypad everyday.


The voice command in my 2007 car to make a cell phone call via bluetooth is even "Dial."
 
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