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As I wire the AV room in my new house, I'm testing cables to find a long one that works as well. I got a 35' one from Key Digital (http://www.keydigital.com/Downloads/Champion/Commercial_ProK_HDMI_Cables.pdf) as the specs say it should pass the full 18.0 Gb/sec signal and a friend that does CI work has had success with them.

From the Samsung player to a receiver (multiples, I'm doing reviews right now) or to the Vizio P65-C1 it works great. From the receiver to the Vizio, it totally fails. Same if I put the HDFury Integral into the signal chain to try to read the EDID, but it just isn't working. So either those devices aren't putting out enough voltage for it to work correctly, or something else. Using the passive 20' Monoprice UltraHD Premium cable (which is used for my projector typically) it works fine. Ordered the Monoprice Cabernet this morning and it will arrive Tuesday, and then I'll see if that works.

The KeyDigital is failing off the receiver even when using 1080p content from an AppleTV, making me think it's more of a voltage issue from the receiver than an HDMI 2.0 bandwidth issue, but I can't be certain. Checking with the receiver engineer to see what the voltage is and if that could be a possibility. But this is a huge headache for people.
My 30 foot Key Digital cable is spotty at best. I've been quite disappointed with it.
 

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Unless the CAT-7 cable is a solid core, 24AWG copper cable (non-CCS and not an ethernet patch cable) I think distance will still be a problem. It will be interesting to see how, and if, Altona certifies HDMI 2.0a with a CAT-7 cable. Fiber optic should work ok and there are some very favorable reviews but keep in mind your bend radius. My guess is that for a lot of setups, the solid core copper is going to be that way to go with some sort of active termination (HDBT for example) and not an "HDMI cable".
When you said bend radius , do you mean fiber optic cable should not have sharp bending like going around the corner ?

Another question I'd like to ask is for my old monoprice 10.2gps redmere cable. One end is labeled as source the other end is labeled as display . I am wondering if I can use it the other way around like connecting display end to blu Ray player?

Thanks
 

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When you said bend radius , do you mean fiber optic cable should not have sharp bending like going around the corner ?

Another question I'd like to ask is for my old monoprice 10.2gps redmere cable. One end is labeled as source the other end is labeled as display . I am wondering if I can use it the other way around like connecting display end to blu Ray player?

Thanks
No cable should have sharp bending and that applies to ALL cables. If you need a bend make sure its a large round smooth bend, not 90 degrees. There is a reason end of cable is labled source and display for active cables since signal travels one direction.....means it directional only or it won't work at all. Source end goes to bluray, display end to your tv/projector.
 
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No cable should have sharp bending and that applies to ALL cables. If you need a bend make sure its a large round smooth bend, not 90 degrees. There is a reason end of cable is labled source and display for active cables since signal travels one direction.....means it directional only or it won't work at all. Source end goes to bluray, display end to your tv/projector.
Thanks ereed.
 

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Ereed,

I also wanted to find someone to test the MP active optical cable at 75'. HOWEVER, As Otto and others have said time and time again in this thread and others, it's the cable description that threw me.

Seems there are two versions of the same HDMI active optical cable, a regular and a CL2 rating (to run behind walls.). Since my wife insists I need to hide the cabling, I will need the CL2 rated cable - but it's description reads the same except for the actual resolution, [email protected] (not 60Hz). Why adding a CL2 rated cable jacket would drop it from 60Hz to 30Hz is beyond me. If it's a typo, they should correct it and get more people to buy the cable. Until they do, I won't waste money trying to test it out.
 

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It could be a simple thing as cost. Adding a fire rated cable jacket to a cable that is tested to certain specs may be more costly to the mfr. I can't imagine that the cost would be prohibitive but who knows. I installed my solid core CAT-6 in a conduit and I don't remember if the cable is CL2/CL3 rated or not. I don't worry about it.
 

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If you get a permit to perform the cable run, then get the cable that's up to code for your municipality, since it will be inspected.
Otherwise, I would get what works and not be overly concerned about CLx ratings. Just be sure you test (dry run) that ANY cable before a permanent 'in-wall' installation.
 

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Ereed,

I also wanted to find someone to test the MP active optical cable at 75'. HOWEVER, As Otto and others have said time and time again in this thread and others, it's the cable description that threw me.

Seems there are two versions of the same HDMI active optical cable, a regular and a CL2 rating (to run behind walls.). Since my wife insists I need to hide the cabling, I will need the CL2 rated cable - but it's description reads the same except for the actual resolution, [email protected] (not 60Hz). Why adding a CL2 rated cable jacket would drop it from 60Hz to 30Hz is beyond me. If it's a typo, they should correct it and get more people to buy the cable. Until they do, I won't waste money trying to test it out.
Like others said get the one that advertises better spec and run in conduit if its behind walls and forget the fire rated specs. Let us know how it works and if it works.
 

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Like others said get the one that advertises better spec and run in conduit if its behind walls and forget the fire rated specs. Let us know how it works and if it works.
You don't know me, I don't know you. The advice you just gave is dangerous. I had this discussion with my my local fire department code enforcement (Waco, TX) during the summer of 2015. Long story short, conduit or not, cables run behind drywall MUST be CL rated. If not and a fire does occur, whether the cables are the cause or not, your home insurance company could decide to not cover you. Whether it would uphold in court if the cables are not the cause, is above my head and beyond the code enforcement officer. Additionally, we were told not to run power cables in conduit with other signal carrying cables due to fire hazard and potential interference. For power, it's best to have permanent romex installed. Conduit can be used, but mainly as a convenience factor for cables that may need to be changed out, such as HDMI or data cables. Romex should be tacked down per code.

We were hit by lightning in April '15 that discharged in the front yard, traveled the coax and power lines to take out almost everything electronic in the house, including appliances and my highly worshiped HT equipment. $100k later, all was replaced, including $40k in new HT equipment for the LVR and MBR. Since we had to replace everything, we went with 4K capable equipment but have had to wait (im)patiently for cables to catch up to technology. The information on MP coming with cables in Feb '17 (fingers crossed) that will be new chip tech is encouraging.

That being said, I noticed you have been asking for several months if someone had tested the non-cl2 rated MP active optical cable. My advice, buy it and test it yourself.
 
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You don't know me, I don't know you. The advice you just gave is dangerous. I had this discussion with my my local fire department code enforcement (Waco, TX) during the summer of 2015. Long story short, conduit or not, cables run behind drywall MUST be CL rated. If not and a fire does occur, whether the cables are the cause or not, your home insurance company could decide to not cover you. Whether it would uphold in court if the cables are not the cause, is above my head and beyond the code enforcement officer. Additionally, we were told not to run power cables in conduit with other signal carrying cables due to fire hazard and potential interference. For power, it's best to have permanent romex installed. Conduit can be used, but mainly as a convenience factor for cables that may need to be changed out, such as HDMI or data cables. Romex should be tacked down per code.

We were hit by lightning in April '15 that discharged in the front yard, traveled the coax and power lines to take out almost everything electronic in the house, including appliances and my highly worshiped HT equipment. $100k later, all was replaced, including $40k in new HT equipment for the LVR and MBR. Since we had to replace everything, we went with 4K capable equipment but have had to wait (im)patiently for cables to catch up to technology. The information on MP coming with cables in Feb '17 (fingers crossed) that will be new chip tech is encouraging.

That being said, I noticed you have been asking for several months if someone had tested the non-cl2 rated MP active optical cable. My advice, buy it and test it yourself.

I wasn't saying you should never run CL rated cable behind walls. Of course you should get CL rated cable for safety for behind walls but you were stating that CL version doesn't have higher specs as non CL version so I was saying to go that route if you needed the 4K 60hz instead of 30hz CL rated you wanted but use a conduit at least.

I would buy it but no point since I don't have 4K equipment but asking aound since others have been asking for long 4K60hz cable that works so that was my recommendation based on cable specs since no one has tested it yet. I'm still on 1080p and my 50 foot redmere works just fine for now.

But again 8K will be here in 5 years and they will have different type of cable connnector which is not same as current HDMI and will not work on current equipment and we will be replacing cables all over again. lol
 

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Brought up 8K to my wife and the use of it in Japan: (finger wag, arched eyebrow) - "Not unless we are hit by lightning again or win the lottery." I guess I have five years to work on her! I should have installed the conduit in summer of '15.
 

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This thread has been a journey for me and my head is spinning. I got a new AVR on the way and while I got everything out I wanna get some new HDMI cables so i'm "4k HDR" ready for when I upgrade TVs. I got stuff that is 10+ years old in my loop right now. So I got a bunch of stuff going into the AVR, only things that do 4K and HDR will be my PC, PS4 Pro, and Xbox One S. Then I just got other stuff like a WiiU and PS3/360 that i'm sure i can get away using whatever cable I find. For the 4k HDR gear, would a active Monoprice Slim cable work? All these cables would like 10feet with maybe the PC needing a 15ft one. Now the bigger question, from my new AVR to my TV, what should I use? Monoprice slim cables go up to 15ft and i'm not sure that will reach. 20/25 is what i'm thinking i'm gonna need. I guess I shouldn't use active cables for both runs?
 

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You don't know me, I don't know you. The advice you just gave is dangerous. I had this discussion with my my local fire department code enforcement (Waco, TX) during the summer of 2015. Long story short, conduit or not, cables run behind drywall MUST be CL rated. If not and a fire does occur, whether the cables are the cause or not, your home insurance company could decide to not cover you. Whether it would uphold in court if the cables are not the cause, is above my head and beyond the code enforcement officer. Additionally, we were told not to run power cables in conduit with other signal carrying cables due to fire hazard and potential interference. For power, it's best to have permanent romex installed. Conduit can be used, but mainly as a convenience factor for cables that may need to be changed out, such as HDMI or data cables. Romex should be tacked down per code.

We were hit by lightning in April '15 that discharged in the front yard, traveled the coax and power lines to take out almost everything electronic in the house, including appliances and my highly worshiped HT equipment. $100k later, all was replaced, including $40k in new HT equipment for the LVR and MBR. Since we had to replace everything, we went with 4K capable equipment but have had to wait (im)patiently for cables to catch up to technology. The information on MP coming with cables in Feb '17 (fingers crossed) that will be new chip tech is encouraging.

That being said, I noticed you have been asking for several months if someone had tested the non-cl2 rated MP active optical cable. My advice, buy it and test it yourself.
Excellent story. I purchased a $50 "whole House" surge supressor with a GE label from Home Depot and installed it at my entrance panel. The purpose of this was to give some protection to all of the electronics in the house--everything today has processors (refrigerator, stoves, HVAC, washer, dryer, thermostats) in addition to our home electronics. For my HT area, I also put in a Brick Wall surge blocker as a belt and suspenders solution. Even this may not be full protection for a nearby lightning strike, where all of the house's wiring is inductively charged with a spike. A whole house surge supressor may shunt the spike to ground but the farther the sensitive load is from the panel, the more likely that a spike may reach the sensitive equipment before the shunt at the panel dissipates it all. They are great for strikes to the electrical lines leading to the house but not a sure thing for a nearby strike. For that you need surge supressors very close to the equipment power cords. You also need surge supressors at the point where the coax screws to the equipment. These are in-line devices about the size of M/F adapter. I put them at the point where the DirecTV cables screwed to the splitter. Of course, every time I had a DirecTV service upgrade, the installer would remove them; but I'd put them back as soon as he left.
 

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What's the verdict on getting a long run cable that supports 4k? (sorry, this thread is huge and splinters)

I'm looking for something 35-40 foot

Will monoprice redmere work, or?
 

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What's the verdict on getting a long run cable that supports 4k? (sorry, this thread is huge and splinters)

I'm looking for something 35-40 foot

Will monoprice redmere work, or?
At this point in time, trial and error. The only advantage of Redemere cables is extending the run longer than about 25' without loss of signal. However, the newer video standards are demanding and there is no way to tell how current the chipsets are in an active cable. There are newer chipsets coming out but as to which active cables, and devices for that matter, will have them is very difficult to ascertain. A passive cable may work at that length if the wire gauge is thick (24AWG) but you'll lose flexibility. If your cables are in-wall, and you've installed a conduit, it will be easier to try different cables until you find one that works to your expectations.

You could try a solid core CAT-6a cable (non-CCS and not a CAT-6 ethernet patch cable) and then actively terminate it with something like HDBT but that can be pricey and you may encounter the same chipset issues.
 

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Excellent story. I purchased a $50 "whole House" surge supressor with a GE label from Home Depot and installed it at my entrance panel. The purpose of this was to give some protection to all of the electronics in the house--everything today has processors (refrigerator, stoves, HVAC, washer, dryer, thermostats) in addition to our home electronics. For my HT area, I also put in a Brick Wall surge blocker as a belt and suspenders solution. Even this may not be full protection for a nearby lightning strike, where all of the house's wiring is inductively charged with a spike. A whole house surge supressor may shunt the spike to ground but the farther the sensitive load is from the panel, the more likely that a spike may reach the sensitive equipment before the shunt at the panel dissipates it all. They are great for strikes to the electrical lines leading to the house but not a sure thing for a nearby strike. For that you need surge supressors very close to the equipment power cords. You also need surge supressors at the point where the coax screws to the equipment. These are in-line devices about the size of M/F adapter. I put them at the point where the DirecTV cables screwed to the splitter. Of course, every time I had a DirecTV service upgrade, the installer would remove them; but I'd put them back as soon as he left.
Mod: a bit off-topic, sorry. I'll get back to it by the end.

It's a fun story...NOW....It wasn't fun going through the insurance claim, though! LOL! We are all glad it's behind us, now. We have a lightning rod, but it will only dissipate 95-99% of an average 30,000A lightning strike (according to the electrician that came out.) That still leaves 300-1500A (on average), which seemed to find any avenue into the house. There is an internet coax junction box in the corner of our yard that is directly connected to 4 houses, including ours, but then goes back to the line on the power pole behind us. Every house on the block had to have the junction boxes replaced as the metal connectors melted and fused and almost everyone on the block had to have modems and cable boxes/DTV boxes replaced. We didn't have a whole home surge suppressor. Regardless, the electrician said that even had we had one in place, it probably would have blown everything anyway; the strike was just too near (less than 10ft from the attached garage and the main power panel.)

In the HT closet, we installed 2 SnapAV WATTBoxes and made sure the grounds go to the home gorund which goes to the rod clamp outdoors - two 20A closet power plugs running to new and separate 20A breakers in the circuit panel. I also installed coax network cable surge MOV's in-line and a SnapAV Episode 8 battery backup, which is just not robust enough (450W on the battery side) and trips if the LVR B&W speakers are pushed beyond the Marantz AV8802A level 60 volume combined with the Marantz MM8077 7-channel Amp. We never reach the amp max, but the watt max gets hit and if sustained for longer than 15-20 seconds, will trip. I'll need to get a battery backup that covers a full 1800W this spring with the income tax refund, such as this one by WattBox or something equivalent from Tripp-Lite or Cyber Power.

Anyway, back to topic, I have tested at least 10-12, 30-35 ft HDMI cables and none work or work consistently. My wife made me give up till definitive advances in cable tech. In talks with the CEO of MyCableMart, he told me second-hand that, "HDMI LLC have estimated for every “2 additional connections” that is made beyond the normal two, it adds the equivalent of about 6-8ft of HDMI cable."
Each cable has two connectors, one on each end. This means that if you run a cable from a device (UHD player of Roku 4/Premier/Ultra) into an AVR, then a second cable out from the AVR to the display, just the connectors of the second cable adds resistance, even if you use the smallest possible length. Maybe alebonau can elaborate. Unfortunately, back in summer of '15, I didn't think high-speed HDMI would be problematic for 4K (and it's not if the signal stays @30Hz and 4:2:2 chroma) so I decided against conduit, even though the wall was open at the time. Looking back, that was a questionable call and as now it will cost me way too much to open back up, install conduit and have the sheet rock/drywall repaired, textured and painted. I researched and did a lot of things right, but that was one I got wrong. Otto Pylot is very active in another forum for cables that we both contribute and I wish I had found his advice earlier.
 

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Looking back, that was a questionable call and as now it will cost me way too much to open back up, install conduit and have the sheet rock/drywall repaired, textured and painted. I researched and did a lot of things right, but that was one I got wrong. Otto Pylot is very active in another forum for cables that we both contribute and I wish I had found his advice earlier.
I had conduit installed in one of walls and the installer was able to do it without opening up the wall, so it is possible to install conduit from the attic space down an inside wall. However, if you have a two-story then that's an entirely different matter.
 

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FWIW...
I ran coax from my attic, two floors down to basement, from basement to behind the TV. Luckily, I had a "clean" drop from top to bottom (no "fire breaks). Two holes. sill plate in the attic, one in baseboard. YMMV. Sometimes you have to think vertical as an option too. :)
 

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[/SIZE]Anyway, back to topic, I have tested at least 10-12, 30-35 ft HDMI cables and none work or work consistently. My wife made me give up till definitive advances in cable tech. In talks with the CEO of MyCableMart, he told me second-hand that, "HDMI LLC have estimated for every “2 additional connections” that is made beyond the normal two, it adds the equivalent of about 6-8ft of HDMI cable."
Each cable has two connectors, one on each end. This means that if you run a cable from a device (UHD player of Roku 4/Premier/Ultra) into an AVR, then a second cable out from the AVR to the display, just the connectors of the second cable adds resistance, even if you use the smallest possible length. Maybe alebonnoue can elaborate. Unfortunately, back in summer of '15, I didn't think high-speed HDMI would be problematic for 4K (and it's not if the signal stays @30Hz and 4:2:2 chroma) so I decided against conduit, even though the wall was open at the time. Looking back, that was a questionable call and as now it will cost me way too much to open back up, install conduit and have the sheet rock/drywall repaired, textured and painted. I researched and did a lot of things right, but that was one I got wrong. Otto Pylot is very active in another forum for cables that we both contribute and I wish I had found his advice earlier.
If you can try this..... Run a seperate hdmi cable straight from each source device to the display. May cost more in cables but at least its a straight run and nothing in the middle interferring with the signal. Worst part is changing inputs more often on remote but I'd rather have best possible solution.
 
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