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Green Lantern and Horrible Bosses are going to have UV.
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A vice president of 20th Century Fox, speaking to Pocket-lint, has confirmed that UltraViolet, the cloud-based Blu ray-and-DVD video streaming service, will launch very soon. The same Fox executive also says that every major movie studio has signed onto the program, except Disney, and that the only big consumer electronics holdout Apple will soon toe the purple line.


But what is UltraViolet exactly? You'd be forgiven for having never heard of it but once I tell you what it is, you're either going to dribble with anticipation, or curse like a hippie libertarian who's just had a bunch of human rights sucked out from underneath him. Basically, UltraViolet is a cloud-based library of your digital possessions. When you buy your first UltraViolet Blu-ray disc and slot it into your Blu-ray player at home, it will connect to the internet and ask you to make an account. This Blu-ray disc will then be forever connected to your UltraViolet account.


Now, there are a slew of seriously useful benefits associated with such a system. If you lose the original disc, don't worry: just log into UltraViolet and download a copy or simply stream it from the web. You can also pair multiple devices with your UV account register the Blu-ray disc at home, and then stream it to your office computer, or your smartphone. This will also be the first ever fully-legal way to download TV shows and movies, too: log into the UV online store, purchase a license, and start watching right away. You'll even be able to download your online purchase and burn it to DVD or Blu-ray but of course, for many people, UltraViolet will be a way of finally getting rid of discs and their unsightly plastic cases.


Yes, UltraViolet is awesome but now take a long, hard look at the caveats. For a start, UltraViolet isn't just a cloud-based digital library it's DRM. To play UV Blu-ray and DVD discs, you need to access your digital library to download your license key and if you're not connected to the internet, the TV show or movie simply won't start. Next, think about this for a second: your entire library of movies and TV shows will be stored in the cloud. There isn't a single mention on the UltraViolet website that your library will be private and with almost every major studio, broadcaster, ISP, and tech company on board, you can be guaranteed that they'll be very interested in the contents of your digital library.


Because UltraViolet media cannot be played without internet access, Big Brother will see exactly what you watch and when you watch it. The powers that be will know exactly what kind of advertisements to show you, both on TV and on the web and they'll even be able to turn to companies like Coca-Cola or Verizon and tell them exactly which shows and movies they should buy product placement in.


The truly terrifying thing, though, is that there's no guarantee that UltraViolet will be around for ever and like Assassin's Creed 2 and its infamous, web-based DRM system, what happens if your internet connection goes down when you want to watch a movie? Worse yet, what if UltraViolet is the target of a DDoS attack?
http://www.extremetech.com/computing...ideo-is-coming
 

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And what percentage of people have their Blu-ray or DVD players connected to the Internet? 10%? 5%? Of all my friends, neighbors, and relatives who have BD or DVD players, none of them that I know of have their players connected. Zero. In fact, except for fellow reviewers, only one of the others even has a surround-sound system. The rest listen to movies on disc through their televisions. This UltraViolet scheme has about as much chance of success as getting the Tea Party to vote for a tax hike.


John
 

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There is no talk at all of Blu-ray itself using UV. It will continue to work using AACS+BD+. It is the so called second session or the digital copy which may use UV.


It is also surprising that it says UV will require connectivity to play the content. Connectivity will be needed to authorize the device and license for the content but not each playback. At least that is my understanding of it.


The biggest challenge for UV is whether consumers will understand how it works. As we see from this articles, if the professionals in industry can't figure it out, the consumer doing so will be even a bigger issue.
 

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The BD does not require you use UV. It's only if you want to use the UV to get a DC. Some are using a poorly written article as ammunition against the BD format again. The sky is NOT falling. Chill out.


It also states the DVD requires UV. How many DVD players even have internet connections? I can't think of one mainstream DVD (not BD capable) player that even offers an internet connection option.


UV is just going to start as a more standardize way of distributing DC. I think the point of UV is if you choose to use the system is that the user will have a unique license for the title so in the future if you want to view the content through other distribution means then you don't have to pay again. IOW, if I buy an UV title on Vudu and Vudu goes belly up, then I won't have to purchase the title again through another vendor that offers UV titles. Basically it's tying ownership to an individual. It will hopefully solve the propriety format/system mess we are currently in with streaming/downloading.


I think UV could work, BUT I am still not that interested until they offer BD quality (high bitrate 1080p24 and lossless audio). I find DC for most titles is useless. They take up too much space on a drive and really other than children's titles I rarely use them.
 

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If you think they will allow format independent buy once own forever/everywhere I have a bridge to sell you......
 

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The way ultraviolet works is different then this article puts it.


What its trying to do is once you buy it you own it.


Ultraviolet allows you to register 10 devices. I saw a demo. Lets say I buy a movie, and I want my son to be able to watch it while he is away at university. Once I register that I own the movie it is now available to my 10 registered devices, so now he can watch it.


Also Planning a trip download it to your ipad before you go.


They are also trying to get Hotels to use this system and Airlines. So if you have 200 movies they are available to you anywhere.


Only thing holding this back I personally think is Bandwidth. With internet company having caps a lot of people may not use this. These Company's need to strike a deal with internet companies.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by space2001 /forum/post/20842876


the way ultraviolet works is different then this article puts it.


What its trying to do is once you buy it you own it.


Ultraviolet allows you to register 10 devices.

12 devices.
 
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