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I need two 60ft runs in my backyard for out door speakers and they need to be buried under the ground so I guess i need what they call burial wire? what gauge and kind of wire do I need for this? thanks!
 

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If water gets into conduit, it ain't going to dry out. I would go with direct burial. We used gel filled cable on the railroad.
 

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what gauge and kind of wire do I need for this?
Google voltage-drop calculator.

The bigger the wire, the less voltage drop, the less watts are lost. Thus more potential power at the end.
For 60ft and between 100-1000watts, a 12awg cable will lose ~3-4% wattage.
Bigger wires loose less, but are more expensive...
 

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I'd buy some cables on spools and put on the contacts myself. Should be cheapest option. Get Speakon 1.5mm wire spool, they can handle a lot. But check with regulations where you live, you may need to apply for permission if you dig X centimeters down. You'll also have to let them know that they're there, so in the future if someone digs there and happens to come across them they don't have to act as if they're live high voltage wires (that's an expensive acting job). Cables underground need a particular plastic marking Y inches above them, so people digging there comes across the plastic marker before the cable. The color code on the plastic is also particular, since it lets people know what's underneath it.

EDIT: It would be more practical to just lay the speakon wires (with contact type of choice put on each end) on the top of the dirt along flowerbeds and whatnot else where you won't mow the lawn. No need to go direct with high enough wire thickness. Far far cheaper and quicker than digging as well. I've personally dug hundreds of yards of ditches by hand and with excavator, it takes thrice as long as you think it will take by hand. And twice as long as you think it will take with a small excavator that jumps around like a M******* when you lift one spade worth of dirt (anything under 10 tons).
 

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I would use garden light wire. You can get it in 12 and 14ga at any home center, it's rated for direct burial, and it's low cost.

True speaker wire is not listed for direct burial. It's not an electrical hazard problem but chemicals in the soil may break down the insulation.

Also keep in mind that outdoor speakers are not typically used for critical listening. So you can use smaller wire and get away with losing some performance in this application.
 

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....But check with regulations where you live, you may need to apply for permission if you dig X centimeters down. You'll also have to let them know that they're there, so in the future if someone digs there and happens to come across them they don't have to act as if they're live high voltage wires (that's an expensive acting job). Cables underground need a particular plastic marking Y inches above them, so people digging there comes across the plastic marker before the cable. The color code on the plastic is also particular, since it lets people know what's underneath it.
This is great advice for primary electrical wiring, 120v or higher. But really overkill for speaker and low voltage wires. The OP just wants some backyard speakers. If somebody later digs through the wires, it's not a hazard.

Where I live they want cables and conduit 24in down. Used to be 18in but is now 24in in the new codes. But this does not apply to low voltage wiring like sprinklers, garden lights, and in this case, speakers.
 

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I need two 60ft runs in my backyard for out door speakers and they need to be buried under the ground so I guess i need what they call burial wire? what gauge and kind of wire do I need for this? thanks![/


I agree with Glimmie - Try this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Cerrowir...scape-Lighting-Wire-Black-241-1602F/202206450 . You can test it by hooking it up before you bury it. Just stretch it out in your backyard and give it a listen test. If you are not satisfied, take it back. Home Depot will take anything back.
 

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If somebody later digs through the wires, it's not a hazard.
They won't know that its not a hazard, and have to act accordingly as if its a hazard.
 

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They won't know that its not a hazard, and have to act accordingly as if its a hazard.
Again, it's just a speaker wire in somebodies back yard. If someone down the road digs it up and wants to be careful, all the better. I sincerely doubt his local authority requires low voltage garden wiring to be marked.

I know the NEC fairly well and your points are quite valid for line voltage, gas, and other hazards. But when a consumer just wants to do a simple job, lets not complicate it to the point where it's an overwhelming task and expense. This is not a safety hazard at all.
 

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Again, it's just a speaker wire in somebodies back yard. If someone down the road digs it up and wants to be careful, all the better. I sincerely doubt his local authority requires low voltage garden wiring to be marked.

I know the NEC fairly well and your points are quite valid for line voltage, gas, and other hazards. But when a consumer just wants to do a simple job, lets not complicate it to the point where it's an overwhelming task and expense. This is not a safety hazard at all.
Its not an overwhelming task and expense to file some bloody paperwork. The uncertainty about what paperwork needs doing is far more exhausting than actually doing the paperwork once you figure out what paperwork needs doing. If you don't document exactly what you do you can be liable for damages later on, and anyone who learns you have undocumented work on your house or property will avoid it for the exact same reason you avoid doing paperwork because you're uncertain about what paperwork exactly needs doing. People avoid uncertainty.
Also, it does not matter if there's actual danger going on, whoever digs up the lines will have to bloody well pay for all the health and safety procedures that they take when they come across potential high voltage wires. And they can make you incur that cost if you don't document your work. The person who buys the property can also make you pay for the removal of the wires if they aren't documented to be there.
Norway is pathological about documentation, but its for a bloody good reason.

EDIT: Call the office where you file for changes in your building schematics and such, whatever its called, and ask them what documentation they require and such. They get paid for figuring it all out for you. My guess is you get a map of your property and simply have to write down approximately where you lay the wire on the property, relative to some property markers, and specify approximate depth. Then they'll just store that in the archives so that when you later want all the schematics for the property and building they then have the schematics that say where the speaker wires are and what they do. Half an hour drawing and geometry. You'll spend a few more hours worth of paycheck on the wires themselves so its not a big extra expense.
 

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How about just burying it a couple of inches down and pulling it out when you move?
 

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How about just burying it a couple of inches down and pulling it out when you move?
So literally incurring all the cost and effort of putting it up and then selling the house without the added price that an outdoor stereo provides? All because some paperwork is too much calories spent (aka effort)? Calories come in the form of cake, do more paperwork and eat more cake.
 

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Also, it does not matter if there's actual danger going on, whoever digs up the lines will have to bloody well pay for all the health and safety procedures that they take when they come across potential high voltage wires. And they can make you incur that cost if you don't document your work. The person who buys the property can also make you pay for the removal of the wires if they aren't documented to be there.
Norway is pathological about documentation, but its for a bloody good reason.
This is "low voltage" wiring.
Worry about remediation before or after you move. With low voltage wiring, that should take about 5 minutes. If you move...
This is not Norway. IMHO, you're making a mountain out of fjord. :D
 
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Norway is pathological about documentation, but its for a bloody good reason.
This is the USA, not Norway. While our building codes are state of the art, nobody here is liable for some abandoned buried low voltage wiring on their former residential property. Line voltage, yes, that is if it can be proven the last owner did the work.

You are taking a simple weekend DIY project way out of context.
 

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I would use garden light wire. You can get it in 12 and 14ga at any home center, it's rated for direct burial, and it's low cost.

True speaker wire is not listed for direct burial. It's not an electrical hazard problem but chemicals in the soil may break down the insulation.

Also keep in mind that outdoor speakers are not typically used for critical listening. So you can use smaller wire and get away with losing some performance in this application.
Now that wasn't so hard, was it?

Since when do you need permission to install a low-voltage garden lighting ("Malibu") system bought at Depot? You're just using speakers instead of lights and an amplifier after the power transformer.

BTW, the garden wire at Depot makes excellent flexible indoor finely-stranded speaker wire.
 

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Since when do you need permission to install a low-voltage garden lighting ("Malibu") system bought at Depot? You're just using speakers instead of lights and an amplifier after the power transformer.
Since when was it too much work to file one piece of paper to document what you do for posterity? What would you think about some undocumented piece of electrical hardware in the lawn by the last guy? Would you really think its quality work or would you think some numpty's wiring job is going to set the house on fire one day? Will your house get shorted out if the lightning strikes in the lawn or will the lightning rod do its job still? If the dog digs it up and chews on it will the dog die? These are all things the last guy would say "no" to, but without documentation his word is about as good as whatever level you trusted your last phone-salesman.
But hey, not Norway, do whatever makes you feel free :rolleyes:
 
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