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HDR TV shall support all HDR formats.

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Good luck getting Auro3D to give their stuff away for free. It's an extra £200 on the cost of my Denon amp, so only a tiny fraction of users have paid for it. It's a moribund format (IMHO).
 

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Discussion Starter · #102 ·
"McIntosh is happy to announce the release of a free firmware update that brings full support for both DTS:X and Auro-3D object-based 3D audio to the MX122 A/V Processor."
http://hometheaterreview.com/firmware-update-adds-dtsx-and-auro-3d-to-mcintosh-mx122/

£200 for a pure software upgrade!
So, it is weird that no fee is charged by Denon for DTS:X upgrade.

"Denon introduces DTS:X to selected AV Receivers. It just needs to be unlocked with a free-of-charge future firmware update."
http://www.denon.com/Pages/DTSX.aspx
 

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"McIntosh is happy to announce the release of a free firmware update that brings full support for both DTS:X and Auro-3D object-based 3D audio to the MX122 A/V Processor."
http://hometheaterreview.com/firmware-update-adds-dtsx-and-auro-3d-to-mcintosh-mx122/

£200 for a pure software upgrade!
So, it is weird that no fee is charged by Denon for DTS:X upgrade.

"Denon introduces DTS:X to selected AV Receivers. It just needs to be unlocked with a free-of-charge future firmware update."
http://www.denon.com/Pages/DTSX.aspx
In the case of DTS:X it was not an "upgrade", it was part of the paid-for featureset, delivered LATE to customers due to circumstances beyond Denon's control. You'll see they call it an update not an upgrade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #104 · (Edited)
High-fidelity HDR video: Preservation of artistic intent

. Preservation of artistic intent:

""In the making of commercial images the only thing that matters is what happens at the approval process. Everything that happens downstream of this should not alter this image." In other words, the "artistry" happens in mastering process and once approved, should be faithfully delivered to the end user."
[Charles Poynton]
http://www.insightmedia.info/a-day-with-charles-poynton/





. Hunt effect (one of many color appearance phenomena) & consequent color correction:

"To illustrate the Hunt effect, Poynton suggested we think of the color of flowers in sunlight, then think of the color of those same flowers at twilight. The color of the flowers has not changed, but our perception of the colorfulness of them has – they don’t look as colorful in dim light.
His point: "If you capture the flowers in daylight and show on a display with only 300 nits of brightness, the flowers will look like they are captured at twilight."
Since displays cannot show the full dynamic range of the natural world, we have to apply "artistic intent" to alter the image to produce what is desired. In other words, if you want the flowers rendered at 300 nits to have the visual colorfulness that they did in sunlight, you have to add more color. It is not accurate, but it conveys the artistic intent."



. Hunt effect & dynamic metadata:

"With the Dolby Vision [or other upcoming SMPTE ST 2094-based Dynamic HDR] mastering process one needs only store a single 4000 nit HDR master and multiple sets of dynamic metadata at differing nits levels [e.g. 300 nits, 500 nits, 800 nits, 1000 nits, 2000 nits, 3000 nits], to produce other lesser peak luminance masters if/when needed
 

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Discussion Starter · #105 · (Edited)
Active HDR: SMPTE ST 2094-10 dynamic metadata adaptation for consistent visual

=> Active HDR with Dolby Vision:
"The W7 series and all LG 2017 OLED TVs feature Active HDR for displaying next-generation HDR content designed to render brighter scenes and greater shadow detail. Active HDR allows LG TVs to process the picture frame-by-frame, inserting dynamic data where needed. This technology allows the TV to offer the best possible picture even if the original HDR content contains static or no metadata at all."
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-rele...to-a-new-dimension-at-ces-2017-300385553.html




=> Interpretation:
Active HDR with Dolby Vision is aimed at enhancing the HDR10 rendering by using a SMPTE ST 2094-10 scene-by-scene color volume mapping or display adaptation.

. Display adaptation (or color volume mapping):
The display adaptation is a mapping process which aims at converting a video signal, created on a reference mastering display capable to display a large color volume (i.e. color gamut + luminance), to a video signal suitable to a TV with lesser color volume capabilities.






. Problem of HDR10: no standardized display adaptation
A display adaptation specification (such as SMPTE ST 2094 display adaptation for consistent visual) is missing in HDR10.



Each TV maker has to create and implement its proprietary HDR10 display adaptation, which can be more and less dumb or more and less smart.



http://www.dvinfo.net/article/show_reports/hpa-tech-retreat-2014-day-5.html


. A typical HDR10 display adaptation exploiting the HDR10 static metadata:
As static metadata are used for the whole piece of content, the color volume mapping is based only on the brightest scene when making use of MaxCLL (Maximum Content Light Level).
https://www.cta.tech/News/Press-Releases/2015/August/CEA-Defines-‘HDR-Compatible’-Displays.aspx



The color volume mapping shall be more accurate if it can make use of scene-by-scene content information.



http://www.avsforum.com/forum/465-h...al-hdr-compliant-displays-3.html#post50016609

Another example:
http://forum.blu-ray.com/showpost.php?p=13107016&postcount=68


. Active HDR: a SMPTE ST 2094-10 scene-by-scene display adaptation
Scene-by-scene content information is created on the fly by a HDR10 incoming video signal analysis process running on an Active HDR-compliant TV.
Maximum, mean, minimum luminance values of the incoming HDR10 video signal are computed in real time on a scene-by-scene basis. These SMPTE ST 2094-10 dynamic metadata allow more accurate color volume mapping processed by the Dolby Vision Display Management of the Active HDR-compliant TV.







https://www.smpte.org/sites/default/files/Study Group On High-Dynamic-Range-HDR-Ecosystem.pdf

SMPTE ST 2094-10 is also aimed for use in broadcast TV system.
http://www.avsforum.com/forum/465-h...al-hdr-compliant-displays-3.html#post49795977
 

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Discussion Starter · #106 ·
With upcoming 2017 LG OLED TV, Dolby Vision-compliant UHD Blu-ray player and Dolby Vision UHD Blu-ray disc, hopefully we will see HDR content shootouts between HDR10 and "Active HDR with Dolby Vision" and Dolby Vision with content grading explanations by the colorists.
https://library.creativecow.net/wilson_tim/House-of-Cards_post-production/1
http://www.studiodaily.com/2015/06/colorist-stephen-nakamura-grading-tomorrowland-dolby-vision/



"Vis-à-vis thru the CMU, Dolby provides an automatic conversion for that and if the colorist isn’t completely satisfied with the look, he/see can always trim it, manually with the color correction controls."
[Penton]
http://forum.blu-ray.com/showpost.php?p=13192682&postcount=1151

Dolby Vision = Automatic data-driven conversion (at the mastering time) + Manual color correction

"Active HDR with Dolby Vision" = Automatic data-driven conversion (at the TV playback time)

Color volume mapping with color correction metadata should better preserve the artistic creative intent.
http://www.avsforum.com/forum/465-h...al-hdr-compliant-displays-4.html#post50666105
 

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Discussion Starter · #107 ·
Technical descriptions by Charles Poynton‏ of terms relating to image appearance that are important to image signal processing in professionally produced digital cinema and video/HD/UHD (scene-referred, display-referred, mastering-display-referred, etc.):
https://twitter.com/momaku/status/834254655467245569
 

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Technical descriptions by Charles Poynton‏ of terms relating to image appearance that are important to image signal processing in professionally produced digital cinema and video/HD/UHD (scene-referred, display-referred, mastering-display-referred, etc.):
https://twitter.com/momaku/status/834254655467245569
Cool. I shall impress all my friends by casually dropping "Poynton’s Zeroth Axiom" into the conversation :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #109 ·
Don’t mention the format war

"If you’re somewhat up-to-date on the development of High Dynamic Range (HDR) video you’ll be aware that there are different standards in the market. HDR10 and Dolby Vision have so far attracted most attention and recently Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) has gained prominence.
Yet more standards exist.

There is no HDR format war. Here’s why.

If you’re old enough you’ll have witnessed the video cassette format war of the early eighties. There was JVC’s VHS, Sony’s technically superior Betamax and if you lived in Europe you may know Philips had an even better format – Video Compact Cassette (VCC), also known as V2000. These physical formats had different dimensions and characteristics. A VHS tape would only fit into a VHS deck, not into a Beta VCR, and vice versa. If was not possible, or at least not practical, to make hardware that could deal with more than one format.

How very different is the situation with HDR.
We’re talking about digital formats here, that are not tied tightly to physical formats. Decoding the content is a matter of software, and there’s nothing that bars a manufacturer from supporting multiple formats. – they’re in no way mutually exclusive. In fact, most TV makers by now do support more than one type of HDR (see diagram below). OTT streaming providers Netflix, Vudu and Amazon Prime Video support both HDR10 and Dolby Vision. The Ultra HD Blu-ray standard supports three HDR formats; HDR10 is mandatory for all discs and all players.



The situation is akin to surround sound formats: Any decent AV Receiver will support a variety of standards from Dolby, DTS and sometimes other companies. Of course, these are all decoded on DSPs where an algorithm is added relatively easily, provided it has enough processing power.

Are the HDR formats completely interchangeable? Not really; they offer different benefits. HDR10 uses static metadata whereas Dolby Vision uses dynamic metadata which can offer better picture quality. Dolby Vision however requires a license while HDR10 is a free standard. HLG in turn offers benefits to broadcasters in terms of compatibility with existing production workflows, making it easier to deploy and to use for live broadcasts.

Is it dangerous to suggest there’s a format war?
Absolutely. Around 2000, two competing high-resolution, multi-channel audio carriers came to market – DVD-Audio and Super Audio CD. Initially, players and discs were not interchangeable and a lot of coverage spoke of a format war. Not much later universal disc players appeared that accepted both formats but it was too late: The general perception had become that either format had to win out over the other and many prospective buyers took a wait-and-see approach. Both formats continue to see new releases to this day but have been confined to a niche. Of course, other factors may have played a role but the perceived format war has been disastrous.
...
Expect universal or at least multi-HDR support to become the norm."

For more details, have a look at
http://yoeri.geutskens.com/blog/no-hdr-format-war.html

 

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Discussion Starter · #111 ·

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"LG G6 is the first phone to debut Dolby Vision HDR. At its launch, the LG G6 will also be compatible with HDR 10.

LG's flagship phone delivers HDR-grade video content from Netflix and Amazon Video that Dolby promises will save on battery life and data consumption.

https://www.cnet.com/news/lg-g6-becomes-first-smartphone-to-debut-dolby-vision-hdr/

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170226005134/en/





I love the build quality and screen quality of the LG phones but man do I ever wish they were timely with their updates and actually supported their phones for longer than 12-18 months.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #116 ·

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Technical descriptions by Charles Poynton‏ of terms relating to image appearance that are important to image signal processing in professionally produced digital cinema and video/HD/UHD (scene-referred, display-referred, mastering-display-referred, etc.):
https://twitter.com/momaku/status/834254655467245569
If you start a twitter feed and name axioms after yourself do more people take you seriously or do you just come off as pompous?
 

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Discussion Starter · #118 ·

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Discussion Starter · #119 ·
All HDR formats supported

LG Signature OLED65W7P W7 Series OLED TV review:
http://www.digitaltrends.com/tv-reviews/lg-signature-oled65w7p-w7-series-oled-tv-review/



" …
The variety of HDR flavors remains a point of confusion. Fortunately, LG is ready to handle all of them.

Given LG has outfitted the W7 OLED with advanced processors capable of being updated to cover all foreseeable HDR formats, I’d say this is about as future-proof a TV as one could expect. I also believe one can expect to get at least 100,000 hours of viewing from this TV before any noticeable fade. In other words: This TV will last longer than you need it to.

If you have the cash and want the coolest looking TV on the planet, then by all means, absolutely buy the LG Signature W7 OLED TV. If the price is a little excessive and you just want to get at the amazing picture quality LG’s 2017 OLEDs deliver, you’ll get exactly that from the less expensive B7 or C7 series."
 
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