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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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The project has started in January and was expected to be completed by August. We'll were somewhat behind.


The rough carpentry is near completion. The electrical and HVAC will completed in the next week.


The insulation will follow.


Then dry wall.


A company specializing in placing absorptive/ Diffusive materials as well as the Guilford of Maine fabric is scheduled for mid-July.


Trim carpenters to follow and paint.


Lets hope all stays on schedule.


As you can tell from some pictures, it is a whole house renovation (80 yr. old Georgian Colonial). We are expecting to move back in by November 2002.


Jeff


What a process........................:(
 

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Quite an undertaking....And I thought I had it tough.


Can't wait to see the final product!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Me, too!


Unlike most here, I am contracting out 100% of the project.


Contracting a HT room to a builder who has no HT experience has its own set of issues. I'll elaborate if any are interested.


Obviously, I am not a do-it-your-selfer.


Jeff


Jeff
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by thebland
Me, too!


Unlike most here, I am contracting out 100% of the project.


Contracting a HT room to a builder who has no HT experience has its own set of issues. I'll elaborate if any are interested.


Obviously, I am not a do-it-your-selfer.


Jeff


Jeff
Please elaborate, I'd like know these issues for when I look for a contractor.


SM
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This home theater is but one project in a whole house renovation. This further complicates the process. I am using the sub contracters for the home theater construction as well as the rest of the house renovation.


Organization is the name of the gain because each sub is there for his interval of time and thenm the next one comes in. Organize and plan the project up front. Defineitely have a professional set of plans ready and reviewed by all subs as well as the contractor prior to the job start! That will give the workers time for questions, location of materials, etc.


Even though I had a seperate set of HT plans. Some details of the plans needed further explantion. The rough carpenters are talented and extremely detail oriented. If the plans are not true architectual plans, there will be a host of questions. This may only apply to the company we used. Everything had to be spelled out EXACTLY!


Dennis was very helpful with many e-mail responses and phone calls along the way. For example, the plans for soffit construction (which seamed very straightforward to me) were not detailed enough for them. However, after I sat down with them, they figured things out.


Everything has managed to turn out as planned but there was a significant amount of oversight that is required. My contractor felt uncomfortable supervising this part of the project, so I did so myself. This is a must!


For example, they questioned the hassle and cost of screwing and glueing everything. Sand in the proscenium........... you can imagine.


In addition, there was trouble finding the exact manufacturer of lighting, as well as insulation. Here again, "can we use this instead". If I did this over again, I would have sought out the material supply houses first rather than hold things up while they looked around for them.


The fact is there are a multitude of short cuts and though the guys on my job are some of the best in the area, improvising and using materials familiar with them makes them happy. We pretty much stuck to the plans, however.


Regarding craftsmenship, they were very good about making sure everything was square, going so far as to use a laser beam for centering the screen. Everything was on right down to within 0" to 1/8" error.


Dennis was very helpful with many e-mail responses and phone calls. Everything has managed to turn out as planned but there is oversight that is required.


There were a multitude of questions throughout and you gotta be there to answer them.


The electicians were great and had no problems understanding anything. They were very familiar with the grafik Eye and found some cheap rope and step lighting for me. As a matter of fact, they made some nice suggestions (like putting a seperate, dedicated electrical panel in the projection room for convenience and easier expnasion on the future (as needed). They ran conduit to all required destinations and tied it tight to the joists.


The plumbers caused one major problem (there is a portion of the master bath above the theater). They piped around the soffits which in turn required the soffits to be larger than planned (because the pipes had to also be drywalled over). I missed that and the plumbers need to be called back to put the water pipes elsewhere. That cost me $$.


I do not have the time, inclination or abilities to carry out such a task. However, you can't just dump off the plans and then say follow 'em and call me when you are done. My advice is to be pro-active and ever watchful!


Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
By the way, I am enjoying the process despite the hassles and headaches.
 

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The only thing that surprised me was that the contractor wanted more detail from Dennis.


I had my last house built, and I am now in the process of contracting my second custom home. I learned that subs will try and do things the easiest way possible from my first. Its human nature. You need either a exceptional general contractor, or "immersive" interest when contracting work. My last builder was OK with me taking interest, but I never directly told a sub what to do. I always called my general and got him involved at the earliest possible moment. It seemed to keep everyone happy.


SM
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have actually felt uncomfortable letting my contractor handle this room alone. We are working in concert. He has no intimate knowledge of the goals of a well designed room. The rough carpenters are very talented. Dennis' plans are complete but I have found that the standard blue and white ink architectural plans are the 'native tongue' to these guys and anything different is a foreign dialect.


Ultimately, the plans were comprehensible to them. They just had to spend the time reading them. The plans were thorough - just different.


I have been working directly with the subs on this room. You know the old tale of the story that is passed from one person to the next, and next, etc. ends up being a different story at the end of the line. For me direct supervision, though more effort, has been fruitful.
 
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