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Discussion Starter #1
So after building my HTPC nearly 8 years ago. I am about to give it up. Truth be told I stopped using her a long time ago...to many windows updates and loss of support made it more tedious that it should have been. And with the advent of youtube TV will it has become obsolete in my household. My son however has taking a liking to gaming and he wants to record his games so I figured I will fix up the old girl, give her some updates and let him have at it.

Today, I changed the CPU from a I3 to an I7. We need to hook up a capture card and since this is an older build we figure we needed the extra juice. I am happy to report that the switch went well.

I tried to upgrade from Windows7 to Windows 10 but I kept on getting an error ox80080005 error which does not really show up as a typical error on Microsoft support. After some research, while this, error can mean many things, I believe that I have something on the my PC that launches first which is impeding Windows 10 to do its thing.

I accidentally deleted the flexraid software from the PC. So now my flexraid drive is gone, this is the one that I had all my movies. Its not the end of the world if the ripped movies are gone, but I need to figure out how to see all of those HDD on my file manager. All in all I have one SSD, this is my C; drive which is where I am hoping to save an install W10. I have an E, which is one of the remaining 4 internal HDD in the PC, but how do I now go about finding the other 3 or labeling them so they show on the file manager three.

Thank in advance for any help you can provide.
 

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Try physically disconnecting the SATA cables from all your drives other than the SSD and DVD drive. Then try the upgrade again. It is best to use an image to install the Win 10 upgrade.
Create installation media for Windows

Make sure your systems meets the minimum requirements
Windows 10 system requirements

Don't Format your C: drive or you will lose the free upgrade to Win 10!

You may be able to install the FlexRaid SW on your Win 10 and recover the partitions.
 

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Do you have a spare disk or ssd that you can use temporarily for testing?

I’d try installing Win10 from scratch on that spare disk to determine if the upgrade failure is caused by hardware configuration issues or having incompatible software (e.g. drivers) on the current system disk.

Background:

The installer created on a USB thumb drive by the Media Creation Tool (and no license key) will install a fully functional copy of Win10, although some minor features won’t be available until you install a valid key. If you do the install while not connected to the network, it’ll let you create a local user account with no need for a Microsoft account.

Make sure you’ve disconnected all current disks before attempting the install, of course.

A web search for
careyholzman windows 10 site:youtube.com
will provide a list of videos showing in detail how to create the installation tool and install Win10 on a “new“ system. Some of his installation tips aren’t immediately obvious in MS prompts. (Like how to avoid the use of a Microsoft account.)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thanks all for the posts. I have done a quick search on this topic. And I have come across many sites, including MS that states I should go into the command prompt and complete several commands, about 8 steps in all. Seems simple enough, but in every scenario, those 8 steps were done in Windows 10. I am in Win 7 trying to get to 10. Not sure if that will be an issue.

2nd, while I understand that concept of unplugging the HDD drives, my concern is that all the programs that may be impeding the download are on the SSD drive. I only have data on my HDD and no programs so to me unplugging the HDD would not work. So in theory I would have to unplug my SSD for this to work which would not be prudent. BTW I do have a free 32GB USB stick, what would happen if I downloaded Win 10 on the USB stick? How would that affect the process?

3rdly, I thought about simply uninstalling all the programs on the SSD with the exception of Win7 and other crucial programs,(AsRock programs for example) perhaps this would work.

4thly- I am not sure what version of Windows 7 that I own. I'm at work and not at home for me to look at. Having said this, if at the very least, I do not have Windows 7 SP1 it looks like this means that I cannot download the Win 10.

Lastly, If all fails, can I simply go to purchase Win 10 and buy pass all of these issues or would I still run into the same problem. And what is the difference between the free version and the paid for version of Win 10.

Step 3 seems to me to be the fastest and cleanest step. Again I am no longer partial to any programs on the PC and or specifically on the SSD with the exception of Win 7. All of my data are on the HDDs. And those that I may need, like plex to watch my ripped movies downstairs on roku, I can always download them again if and when necessary. . So what would be the fastest and most correct way to clean the SSD. I no I can go into unistall and do one at a time, but that would be the long way.
 

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I'm not sure, but I think the offer for the free upgrade to Windows 10 expired some time ago. You used to get a prompt in Windows 7 to upgrade to Windows 10 for free, but that stopped happening well over a year ago. I believe if you want Windows 10 now you have to pay for it. The good news is that you can buy keys for Windows 10 and other Microsoft products on ebay or other sources dirt cheap. I picked up several keys for Windows 10 Pro for about $10 each. Just download the Windows 10 image from Microsoft and install it on a USB drive per their instructions and then set up your PC BIOS to boot from the USB drive. Disconnect all other drives except the one you want to install Windows 10 on or the install may fail. You can reconnect them later after the initial installation is complete.
 

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As I wrote previously, please take the time to watch Carey Holzman's videos on creating the Media Creation Tool



and on using it to install Windows 10 from scratch.



He does both "in real time" and unscripted, showing all of his own typos (which are few) and describing everything in great detail. That way you'll know exactly what to expect to see at every step of the process and it won't be so scary.

Warning: Carey is a professional computer technician and I've found his livestreams and videos to be quite addictive. He has no patience for the various non-professional computer enthusiast channels on YouTube.


Thanks all for the posts. I have done a quick search on this topic. And I have come across many sites, including MS that states I should go into the command prompt and complete several commands, about 8 steps in all. Seems simple enough, but in every scenario, those 8 steps were done in Windows 10. I am in Win 7 trying to get to 10. Not sure if that will be an issue.
What site and what steps?

The contents of Microsoft's page describing how to get a copy of Windows 10 differ depending on what OS is running on the computer where you're viewing the page. If your computer can't run their Media Creation Tool, you'll see a page which looks like the one below (as seen running Safari on my iPad).

3073124


On the other hand, if you see the page which looks like the image below (as seen running Firefox on my primary Win10 computer), then the Media Creation Tool will run on your computer. In particular, the instructions for using the Media Creation Tool to create a bootable installer on a USB drive work fine on a Win7 computer.

3073106

2nd, while I understand that concept of unplugging the HDD drives, my concern is that all the programs that may be impeding the download are on the SSD drive. I only have data on my HDD and no programs so to me unplugging the HDD would not work.
Unplugging all of the disks, both SSD and HDD, which currently are on your computer is to guarantee that you don't accidentally overwrite one of them while installing Windows 10. Installing, unlike upgrading, completely wipes the destination drive, guaranteeing that the installation is "clean" and uncontaminated by incompatible software or registry settings.
So in theory I would have to unplug my SSD for this to work which would not be prudent.
As I mentioned previously, I strongly urge that you try installing Win10 on a "new" disk. That can be either a brand new SSD or some "sacrificial" disk which contains nothing that you need. New SSDs cost only about $100 per terabyte. A new 256 GB SSD costs less than $30, for example.
BTW I do have a free 32GB USB stick, what would happen if I downloaded Win 10 on the USB stick? How would that affect the process?
The USB stick would be wiped and would only contain the Windows 10 installer. It'd be only good for running that installer, not a full fledged version of Win10. You would boot from that USB and follow its instructions to create your new C: Windows 10 system disk.
3rdly, I thought about simply uninstalling all the programs on the SSD with the exception of Win7 and other crucial programs,(AsRock programs for example) perhaps this would work.
Personally, I consider that to be a waste of your time and far too prone to errors. Software uninstallation procedures seldom remove everything they should. You have no way to know what might be left behind. It might be whatever is causing your upgrade to fail now.
4thly- I am not sure what version of Windows 7 that I own. I'm at work and not at home for me to look at. Having said this, if at the very least, I do not have Windows 7 SP1 it looks like this means that I cannot download the Win 10.
Open a command window (select cmd in the Windows Start menu)
and type the command
winver
It'll open a popup window which provides details about the operating system that's currently running.

You do not need to be running SP1 to do a full installation, since that wipes the disk anyhow. My recollection is that SP1 is only needed if you're doing an in-place upgrade of the running operating system.
Lastly, If all fails, can I simply go to purchase Win 10 and buy pass all of these issues or would I still run into the same problem.
Purchasing a copy of Win10 gets you a license key and a USB stick containing the same Win10 installer as is available on the Media Creatoin Tool page. However, It'll probably be for an older version of Windows 10 than is available on their Web site. (The current version is called 20H2.)
Using the purchased installer to do an upgrade will (or should) do exactly the same things as using the online installer. If you opt to do an upgrade, it'll put a copy of the upgrade software on your running system disk and then invoke it.
And what is the difference between the free version and the paid for version of Win 10.
Whether or not it has a license key. That's all. Without the license key, there will be a watermark in the lower right corner of the desktop saying that it hasn't been activated and you won't be able to configure some of the personalization settings. Everything else works exactly the same. Because it is the same.
Step 3 seems to me to be the fastest and cleanest step. Again I am no longer partial to any programs on the PC and or specifically on the SSD with the exception of Win 7. All of my data are on the HDDs. And those that I may need, like plex to watch my ripped movies downstairs on roku, I can always download them again if and when necessary. . So what would be the fastest and most correct way to clean the SSD. I no I can go into unistall and do one at a time, but that would be the long way.
As I wrote previously, I do not think you should try (again) to install (upgrade to) Win10 on the disk which currently contains Win7. That's likely to fail in exactly the same way as happened the last time. Instead, install Win10 on a fresh, new disk. That way, if it doesn't work the way you need it to, you've lost nothing except your time. The previous Win7 system disk would still be available, unchanged.

Note: if you still have the key that you used to activate Win7, that same license key can be used to activate Win10. You can verify this once you've installed Win10 on a new disk. Once you have a Win10 system disk, you also can shutdown and swap the Win7 and Win10 disks, having only one of them plugged in at a time, to run whichever operating system you prefer. I did this to swap between Win7 and Win10 for more than a year before I finally switched to Win10 permanently.

I hope this helps a little.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
As I wrote previously, please take the time to watch Carey Holzman's videos on creating the Media Creation Tool



and on using it to install Windows 10 from scratch.



He does both "in real time" and unscripted, showing all of his own typos (which are few) and describing everything in great detail. That way you'll know exactly what to expect to see at every step of the process and it won't be so scary.

Warning: Carey is a professional computer technician and I've found his livestreams and videos to be quite addictive. He has no patience for the various non-professional computer enthusiast channels on YouTube.



What site and what steps?

The contents of Microsoft's page describing how to get a copy of Windows 10 differ depending on what OS is running on the computer where you're viewing the page. If your computer can't run their Media Creation Tool, you'll see a page which looks like the one below (as seen running Safari on my iPad).

View attachment 3073124

On the other hand, if you see the page which looks like the image below (as seen running Firefox on my primary Win10 computer), then the Media Creation Tool will run on your computer. In particular, the instructions for using the Media Creation Tool to create a bootable installer on a USB drive work fine on a Win7 computer.

View attachment 3073106

Unplugging all of the disks, both SSD and HDD, which currently are on your computer is to guarantee that you don't accidentally overwrite one of them while installing Windows 10. Installing, unlike upgrading, completely wipes the destination drive, guaranteeing that the installation is "clean" and uncontaminated by incompatible software or registry settings.

As I mentioned previously, I strongly urge that you try installing Win10 on a "new" disk. That can be either a brand new SSD or some "sacrificial" disk which contains nothing that you need. New SSDs cost only about $100 per terabyte. A new 256 GB SSD costs less than $30, for example.

The USB stick would be wiped and would only contain the Windows 10 installer. It'd be only good for running that installer, not a full fledged version of Win10. You would boot from that USB and follow its instructions to create your new C: Windows 10 system disk.

Personally, I consider that to be a waste of your time and far too prone to errors. Software uninstallation procedures seldom remove everything they should. You have no way to know what might be left behind. It might be whatever is causing your upgrade to fail now.

Open a command window (select cmd in the Windows Start menu)
and type the command
winver
It'll open a popup window which provides details about the operating system that's currently running.

You do not need to be running SP1 to do a full installation, since that wipes the disk anyhow. My recollection is that SP1 is only needed if you're doing an in-place upgrade of the running operating system.

Purchasing a copy of Win10 gets you a license key and a USB stick containing the same Win10 installer as is available on the Media Creatoin Tool page. However, It'll probably be for an older version of Windows 10 than is available on their Web site. (The current version is called 20H2.)
Using the purchased installer to do an upgrade will (or should) do exactly the same things as using the online installer. If you opt to do an upgrade, it'll put a copy of the upgrade software on your running system disk and then invoke it.

Whether or not it has a license key. That's all. Without the license key, there will be a watermark in the lower right corner of the desktop saying that it hasn't been activated and you won't be able to configure some of the personalization settings. Everything else works exactly the same. Because it is the same.

As I wrote previously, I do not think you should try (again) to install (upgrade to) Win10 on the disk which currently contains Win7. That's likely to fail in exactly the same way as happened the last time. Instead, install Win10 on a fresh, new disk. That way, if it doesn't work the way you need it to, you've lost nothing except your time. The previous Win7 system disk would still be available, unchanged.

Note: if you still have the key that you used to activate Win7, that same license key can be used to activate Win10. You can verify this once you've installed Win10 on a new disk. Once you have a Win10 system disk, you also can shutdown and swap the Win7 and Win10 disks, having only one of them plugged in at a time, to run whichever operating system you prefer. I did this to swap between Win7 and Win10 for more than a year before I finally switched to Win10 permanently.

I hope this helps a little.
 

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@stamina1914
Did you make a comment on my exposition? Sorry, but I didn’t see it if you did.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
As I wrote previously, please take the time to watch Carey Holzman's videos on creating the Media Creation Tool



and on using it to install Windows 10 from scratch.



He does both "in real time" and unscripted, showing all of his own typos (which are few) and describing everything in great detail. That way you'll know exactly what to expect to see at every step of the process and it won't be so scary.

Warning: Carey is a professional computer technician and I've found his livestreams and videos to be quite addictive. He has no patience for the various non-professional computer enthusiast channels on YouTube.



What site and what steps?

The contents of Microsoft's page describing how to get a copy of Windows 10 differ depending on what OS is running on the computer where you're viewing the page. If your computer can't run their Media Creation Tool, you'll see a page which looks like the one below (as seen running Safari on my iPad).

View attachment 3073124

On the other hand, if you see the page which looks like the image below (as seen running Firefox on my primary Win10 computer), then the Media Creation Tool will run on your computer. In particular, the instructions for using the Media Creation Tool to create a bootable installer on a USB drive work fine on a Win7 computer.

View attachment 3073106

Unplugging all of the disks, both SSD and HDD, which currently are on your computer is to guarantee that you don't accidentally overwrite one of them while installing Windows 10. Installing, unlike upgrading, completely wipes the destination drive, guaranteeing that the installation is "clean" and uncontaminated by incompatible software or registry settings.

As I mentioned previously, I strongly urge that you try installing Win10 on a "new" disk. That can be either a brand new SSD or some "sacrificial" disk which contains nothing that you need. New SSDs cost only about $100 per terabyte. A new 256 GB SSD costs less than $30, for example.

The USB stick would be wiped and would only contain the Windows 10 installer. It'd be only good for running that installer, not a full fledged version of Win10. You would boot from that USB and follow its instructions to create your new C: Windows 10 system disk.

Personally, I consider that to be a waste of your time and far too prone to errors. Software uninstallation procedures seldom remove everything they should. You have no way to know what might be left behind. It might be whatever is causing your upgrade to fail now.

Open a command window (select cmd in the Windows Start menu)
and type the command
winver
It'll open a popup window which provides details about the operating system that's currently running.

You do not need to be running SP1 to do a full installation, since that wipes the disk anyhow. My recollection is that SP1 is only needed if you're doing an in-place upgrade of the running operating system.

Purchasing a copy of Win10 gets you a license key and a USB stick containing the same Win10 installer as is available on the Media Creatoin Tool page. However, It'll probably be for an older version of Windows 10 than is available on their Web site. (The current version is called 20H2.)
Using the purchased installer to do an upgrade will (or should) do exactly the same things as using the online installer. If you opt to do an upgrade, it'll put a copy of the upgrade software on your running system disk and then invoke it.

Whether or not it has a license key. That's all. Without the license key, there will be a watermark in the lower right corner of the desktop saying that it hasn't been activated and you won't be able to configure some of the personalization settings. Everything else works exactly the same. Because it is the same.

As I wrote previously, I do not think you should try (again) to install (upgrade to) Win10 on the disk which currently contains Win7. That's likely to fail in exactly the same way as happened the last time. Instead, install Win10 on a fresh, new disk. That way, if it doesn't work the way you need it to, you've lost nothing except your time. The previous Win7 system disk would still be available, unchanged.

Note: if you still have the key that you used to activate Win7, that same license key can be used to activate Win10. You can verify this once you've installed Win10 on a new disk. Once you have a Win10 system disk, you also can shutdown and swap the Win7 and Win10 disks, having only one of them plugged in at a time, to run whichever operating system you prefer. I did this to swap between Win7 and Win10 for more than a year before I finally switched to Win10 permanently.

I hope this helps a little.
@stamina1914
Did you make a comment on my exposition? Sorry, but I didn’t see it if you did.

Not sure...i was trying to reply to your post. At the time I was using my mobile so perhaps inadvertently I did? Apologies.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
@ Selden Bell Thank you so much. I will watch the videos. Having said this, I think I will go with the purchasing the new SSD. It seems as though that would be simply enough to install the new WIN 10 on. I did have a question in the order. I would have to plug in, plug out the new SSD and the old SSD and HDDs. Afterall I would need to have the old SSD with WIN 7 plugged in so that I can get to the download page. I guess when I am there is that when I unplug it and then plug the new SSD and then go to the BIOS. Thanks for the clarification.
 

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A fresh install of Win10 uses less than about 20GB. Of course, I don’t know what else you would install later on the system disk. If you’re using it only as an HTPC, that wouldn’t be much.

Briefly, under Win7 you’d create the Win10 installer on the USB thumb drive. Then you’d shut down, unplug the network, and disconnect all of the disks, including the Win7 SSD. Then you’d plug in the new blank SSD (where the Win7 SSD had been plugged in) and boot from the USB thumb drive. It would then install Win10 on the SSD. (The video will show you how to respond to the installer’s prompts and when to plug it back into the network.)

Unless you decide to update the BIOS version, the only BIOS interaction might be to tell it to boot from USB instead of from the SSD, and you might not even have to do that, depending on the BIOS settings for boot order.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
A fresh install of Win10 uses less than about 20GB. Of course, I don’t know what else you would install later on the system disk. If you’re using it only as an HTPC, that wouldn’t be much.

Briefly, under Win7 you’d create the Win10 installer on the USB thumb drive. Then you’d shut down, unplug the network, and disconnect all of the disks, including the Win7 SSD. Then you’d plug in the new blank SSD (where the Win7 SSD had been plugged in) and boot from the USB thumb drive. It would then install Win10 on the SSD. (The video will show you how to respond to the installer’s prompts and when to plug it back into the network.)

Unless you decide to update the BIOS version, the only BIOS interaction might be to tell it to boot from USB instead of from the SSD, and you might not even have to do that, depending on the BIOS settings for boot order.
Ok got it. I will watch the video tomorrow and try to complete these steps. I recall when I first built the HTPC, using Assassins guides, I configured the HTPC to boot from the SSD drive where I had the OS saved. I am pretty sure the video will discuss this point, but once all drives are disconnected it would seem to me that I would have to go into the BIOS and tell he system to boot from the USB stick unless by default it would this this on its own. Again I just thinking out loud...I'll watch the video thanks again.

BTW I am reconfiguring the PC from an HTPC to one so my son can live stream his video games. By reconfiguring from a HTPC, what I really mean is that I removing my Ceton 4 PCI card (any one wanna buy it) and upgrading the CPU from an I3 to an I7 for transcoding purposes. I'll be adding an elgato capture card to the system. What I am not doing is changing the Motherboard. The system works on the 2nd and 3rd generation intel chipset. My son is only 12 so after a week he may change his mind so I didn't want to waste time and with changing the motherboard.

Not including the SSD, I have about 9 TB of disks space, I have several ripped Blu- ray movies on which I need to find, since I deleted my flexraid. So any suggestions as to what I else I can use the PC for would be great. I guess, for I couple of $100 I could get a decent Graphics card and he could have a decent PC game rig, but I have no idea what the specs of my system would be equivalent too compared to today' video game counsels.
 

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Ok got it. I will watch the video tomorrow and try to complete these steps. I recall when I first built the HTPC, using Assassins guides, I configured the HTPC to boot from the SSD drive where I had the OS saved. I am pretty sure the video will discuss this point, but once all drives are disconnected it would seem to me that I would have to go into the BIOS and tell he system to boot from the USB stick unless by default it would this this on its own. Again I just thinking out loud...I'll watch the video thanks again.
It depends on exactly which method was used to change the boot configuration: whether by changing,the boot order (in which case you need do nothing), or by limiting the list of boot devices, in which case you’ll have to manually boot from the usb disk device.
BTW I am reconfiguring the PC from an HTPC to one so my son can live stream his video games. By reconfiguring from a HTPC, what I really mean is that I removing my Ceton 4 PCI card (any one wanna buy it) and upgrading the CPU from an I3 to an I7 for transcoding purposes. I'll be adding an elgato capture card to the system. What I am not doing is changing the Motherboard. The system works on the 2nd and 3rd generation intel chipset. My son is only 12 so after a week he may change his mind so I didn't want to waste time and with changing the motherboard.

Not including the SSD, I have about 9 TB of disks space, I have several ripped Blu- ray movies on which I need to find, since I deleted my flexraid. So any suggestions as to what I else I can use the PC for would be great. I guess, for I couple of $100 I could get a decent Graphics card and he could have a decent PC game rig, but I have no idea what the specs of my system would be equivalent too compared to today' video game counsels.
If you could provide the model of motherboard, I’m sure people would be glad to render an opinion. In general, I believe having an i7 would provide substantial performance, with gaming being primarily limited by graphics card choice, and game choice by the amount of ram and disk space.
 

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I accidentally deleted the flexraid software from the PC. So now my flexraid drive is gone, this is the one that I had all my movies. Its not the end of the world if the ripped movies are gone, but I need to figure out how to see all of those HDD on my file manager.
You can get your Flexraid data drives to show up in Windows again by assigning drive letters to them. The contents of the folders that were in the pool drive will probably be scattered across several different data drives but you can put them back together again.
Instructions to assign drive letters here: Change a drive letter
 

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Discussion Starter #17
@ KEN F
I assigned the letters and I found my movies. Thanks a bunch

@Selden Ball
I followed your steps and watch the video and I am happy to report the windows 10 is now on my CPU. One thing though, I did have some issues but MS tech support was able to help. I kept on getting stuck at the section where MS asks you to select a drive to save Win 10. Long story show MS support told me to go in BIOS and change storage configuration from ACHI to IDE. I did this and it worked. Now to be fair, I do not know exactly what this does and if I should change it back please advise.
 

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@ KEN F
I assigned the letters and I found my movies. Thanks a bunch

@Selden Ball
I followed your steps and watch the video and I am happy to report the windows 10 is now on my CPU. One thing though, I did have some issues but MS tech support was able to help. I kept on getting stuck at the section where MS asks you to select a drive to save Win 10. Long story show MS support told me to go in BIOS and change storage configuration from ACHI to IDE. I did this and it worked. Now to be fair, I do not know exactly what this does and if I should change it back please advise.
I’m very glad to learn that you were able to install Win10. How is it working for you?

Needing to select IDE surprises me. I’d expect that to severely limit the disk I/O rates, although that might be part of the problem.

Is its performance OK for your uses? Thst’s what matters, though.

For my own interest,

Exactly what motherboard are you using? What BIOS version? ( Limitations in the motherboard or bugs in an older BIOS version might be responsible.)

Exactly what models of SSD and HDDs are connected? On which SATA ports? (Limitations in older SATA interfaces might be responsible.)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I’m very glad to learn that you were able to install Win10. How is it working for you?

Needing to select IDE surprises me. I’d expect that to severely limit the disk I/O rates, although that might be part of the problem.

Is its performance OK for your uses? Thst’s what matters, though.

For my own interest,

Exactly what motherboard are you using? What BIOS version? ( Limitations in the motherboard or bugs in an older BIOS version might be responsible.)

Exactly what models of SSD and HDDs are connected? On which SATA ports? (Limitations in older SATA interfaces might be responsible.)
Yes my system is relatively old, for a CPU at least. I built it about 6-7 years ago. AS Rock 77M motherboard. Generation 2/3 intel chip set. The SSD was/is Intel 160 SSD, I ended up not using the Inland SSD that I got from MicroCenter $25 for 560/580. As for the SATA ports, not sure they ones that come on the board. I hope this helps.

So now that Win 10 is up and running, I still need to do a few things, add the legato PCi e capture card and add my Seagate hDD's back to the system. What are your thoughts about the IDE( I still do not know what that means) should I change it back to ACHI.
 

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Yes my system is relatively old, for a CPU at least. I built it about 6-7 years ago. AS Rock 77M motherboard. Generation 2/3 intel chip set. The SSD was/is Intel 160 SSD, I ended up not using the Inland SSD that I got from MicroCenter $25 for 560/580. As for the SATA ports, not sure they ones that come on the board. I hope this helps.

So now that Win 10 is up and running, I still need to do a few things, add the legato PCi e capture card and add my Seagate hDD's back to the system. What are your thoughts about the IDE( I still do not know what that means) should I change it back to ACHI.
IDE is an old disk inferface design which predated SATA. Without looking at mobo specs, I don’t know the implications.

edited to add:
here’s a page describing the differences
 
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