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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a fixed resolution of 1366 by 768p. My upscaling dvd player has an output resolution of 720p and 1080i. Which resolution should I choose for the best picture?


Should I let my display upscale or downscale the dvd?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAZZ 1 /forum/post/0


I have a fixed resolution of 1366 by 768p. My upscaling dvd player has an output resolution of 720p and 1080i. Which resolution should I choose for the best picture?


Should I let my display upscale or downscale the dvd?

Try both and see what looks best. In my testing 720p looked a bit better than 1080i.


-Bill
 

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It really depends upon your player, display, and display settings. Set your display's sharpness setting at minimum while evaluating, since that setting is artificial enhancement. If you cannot tell any difference in freeze frame, see if there is any difference for fast action from several different discs.


My up converting DVD player also has a 768p mode (1024x768) which appears to be sharpest on my (PC mode compatible) 40" 1366x768 LCD (at least # of lines match).


I have not been able to perceive a difference yet for 720p vs 1080i. One foreign disc (Asumi, with good english dubbed in US), for some reason displayed its 16:9 image slightly smaller in 720p or 768p (1" black border all around) vs. 1080i full screen, with no clear sharpness winner. Domestic discs with 16:9 image display all modes full screen.


Don't be surprised if you cannot tell any difference at normal viewing distances. HD content on 720p or 1080i OTA channels from built-in digital tuner both look good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the input.


I did find a power point presentation that may clear a few thing. It does say it's easier to upscale than downscale. here is what it says--




Interlacing and Deinterlacing Artifacts



Interlacing artifacts


Twitter

Wide-area flicker

Temporal aliasing

Line Crawl

Deinterlacing artifacts


Feathering/ghosting

Jaggies/stepping

Twitter

Loss of vertical detail

Motion judder

Motion blur

Specialized artifacts



Downscaling Comments

More difficult than upscaling

Each new scaling factor needs cutoff frequency of reconstruction filter to be altered.

Inverse relationship between time (space) and frequency requires filter length to grow proportionately to shrink factor.

Aliasing and lost information can be very visible when a fixed low-order filter is used
 

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Well, working as a Video Editor and a Graphic Artist,


In my experience.. scaling either a still image or a moving video sequence will result in a noticable reduction in image quality.


However, Scaling up tends to look worse than scaling down. (aliasing being the big issue)


It's always easier to "take away" image information.. then to "Make it up"


Thats a big reason why SD video looks soft and mushy when scaled to 1080 or

720.


I can duplicate this quite easily with my Avid and FCP HD edit suites.
 
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