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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I apologize if this question has been asked before. My question is, is it possible to use the second zone of the 7.1 receiver (such as the Pionner Elite 45tx) to bi-amp the main speakers?


As far as I understand, when you choose the surround back speakers as second zone, it will output the main speakers signal to a seperate speakers. So, could I use the same signal to bi-amp my main speakers? If so, has anybody tried it, and how's the result? Thanks!
 

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It might work ok with one important problem. Unless you can force the second zone's volume to match the main zone's, you would have to change the main volume 1st and then go in and adjust the 2nd zone to match, every single time you change the volume. (I don't own Pioneer and if zone volume matching is built-in, sorry for the ramble...:) )
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. I went thru the manual for 43TX, 45TX and 47TX. It seems like the 43TX and 47TX has a SurroundBack mode called Front-Biamp, which is use for this purpose. By setting the SurroundBack mode to Front-Biamp and enable both A & B speakers, I could accomplish what I need.


The 45TX does not seems to have such mode. If I use the second zone of the 45TX and enable both A & B speakers, the B speaker will get the downmix of multichannel signal, which is not what I want as I only want the front channel signal.


I guess I may try the 43Tx. I can live without the auto MCACC and multi room, and the front biamp option will probably benefit me more right now. I hope the new 53TX has such option, but I can't see the manual to confirm that.
 

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It CAN be done, at least on a Denon 5803 (and I would assume, on a 3802/3803 and 4802 also in the same manner) as follows:



Bi-Amping on a Receiver?


You betcha! True all of the benefits of bi-amping cannot be realized without eliminating the passive crossovers in the speaker system and actively bandwidth limiting the signals line level, but adding more clean power to a system is usually a good thing and something I happily welcome. The initial phase of my listening tests were to be conducted in 2 channel and 5.1 multi-channel surround and audio. I thought to myself, why let those two hulking 170 wpc amps that would normally power the back surround channels go to waste. I figured I could simply route the preouts of the main channels into the pre-ins of the rear back channels and boost my headroom by 3dB for the front channels and go to bed with a smile on my face that I had a receiver pumping 340 watts to each of my main speakers.




Well it didn't quite turn out that way as Denon did not provision preamp couplers for this task. A quick phone call questioning “why?†to Denon's fabulous tech support revealed that they did this for a very good reason, eliminate a path for noise. Ordinarily I would have questioned that, but the very fact that year after year, Denon products, namely their receivers and DVD players always measure some of the lowest noise floors in the industry as illustrated by their exceptional Signal to Noise (SNR) measurements in all modes of operation conducted by various audio publications.




After some thought, Denon tech support gave me the info on how to accomplish the bi-amping task. Here is how to do it. Note this will only work if you don't plan on using the amps for surround back channels or multi zone 2 applications.




Bi-Amp Configuration of Main Channels


Step #1: Connect a pair of analog RCA cables from the preamp outs of the “Front†channels to an unused input of the AVR-5803 (In my case, I chose VDP).


Step #2: Select the chosen input as the source for Multi Zone 2.


Step #3: In the Multi Zone Control menu, select power amp assignment for “Multi Zone 2â€.


Step #4: Using the internal test tones of the AVR-5803, position the SPL meter (slow response,

C-weighted) at the listening position and increase the master volume control until each speaker

reads about 75dB.


Step #5: Disconnect the speaker level connections from the “Front†channels at the AVR-5803 and

reconnect them to the appropriate “Multi Zone 2†speaker level connections.


Step #6: Repeat Step#4 while varying the “Multi Zone 2†volume level. I found nearly unity gain

correlation between the “Front†channel and “Multi Zone 2†amplifiers to be at the “Multi Zone 2â€

volume level setting of +2dB.



Note: It would have been nice if the channel trim for this volume level control had +/-0.5dB precision, as all of the other channel trims of this receiver had, for better precision. Better yet, it would have been even nicer if Denon had a unity gain strap for this exact application so I could have avoided the pains of this set-up. Hint Hint. During my operation of the receiver in this set-up, I was always a little concerned if the wife or my daughter were to accidentally press a few wrong buttons on the remote and screw things up. However, if I couldn't audibly notice if this problem occurred, then I probably didn't deserve to worry about it.




Step #7: Remove the jumpers on the back of the main speakers (you would be amazed at how many people forget to do this, Yikes!)


Step #8: Connect a set of wires from the “Front†channels of the receiver to the highs section of each of your front speakers and a set of wires from the “Multi Zone 2†channels of the receiver to the lows of your front speakers.



All of the basic audio calibrations were now complete, with a sign if relief, I was filled with anticipation to begin my subjective listening testing of two channel and 5.1 multi channel audio.
 

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I thought I had read of someone bi-amping with the 45TX, and a google search turned up the following (from a review):


---------------------------------------------------

"My model number is the VSX-D2011 as I purchased in Hong Kong, and this is the model number anywhere outside the USA as far as I can tell.


I also compared to the Denon 3803, and I must say that my decision was heavily influenced by the ability to bi-amp the front two speakers (if only running in 5.1 "mode").


The result is impressive. The bi-amped fronts are B&W DM604 S3's. Man do they pump! I didn't even know about bi-amping and bi-wiring until I researched this purchase, but from what I had read on the www and in magazines, I quickly realised that this was the way to go. Very impressive. The 604's punch out plenty of bass, and the Pioneer has the horsepower and clarity to do them justice."

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