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Hi All,


I have a very quick question.


I was reading this article:
http://www.klipsch.com/how-to-buy-au...nvestment.aspx


Somewhere in the article it says:

A good rule of thumb when trying to pair your speakers up with the right amplifier is to buy at least as much power as your speakers are rated to handle. For example, if a speaker is rated at 75 watts maximum power, then you should buy an amplifier that can deliver at least 75 watts per channel. However, you don't need to limit yourself. You can buy a 100-watt per channel amplifier for a 75-watt speaker "because more speaker failure occurs from being under powered rather than over powered". It is safer to go slightly higher with your amplifier wattage because you'll never be in danger of clipping.


Now, I have just got Marantz SR8002 and I am planning to buy RF-62 speakers in a couple of days. Except the time I watch a movie, I plan to listen to music at low volume most of the times. The question I have is, is it correct to say that "playing at low volume" is equal to "under powering speakers"? In that case, will it not mean that I may potentially damage my speakers? Or what is really the meaning of "under powering the speakers"?


Can the audio experts please address my concerns? Please note that I am not too worried about higher distortion (if any) at lower volume.


Any help appreciated.


Thanks

dharani
 

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"Under powering" Your speaker is much worse, than the opposite, because You might run Your amp into clipping, thus destroying (eventually) Your tweeters.

This doesn't have anything to do with Your personal listening habits (levels) as long, as You don't try to push Your speakers (and Your ears
) to the limits.


High efficiency speakers might be more prone to hum and hiss (noise in general) problems on the amp side, because they make this more audible.
 

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Low power in the sense of low volume won't hurt speakers. The problem occurs when an amp isn't powerful enough at peak volumes which "clips" the signal being sent to the speakers.


If you look at a clipped wave through an oscilloscope, you see a square (stair-step) shape. Speakers distort when trying to reproduce the signal and become damaged fairly quickly.
 
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