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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Setup:

Yamaha v2500

Mains: Energy C-9

Center: Energy C-C3

Surrounds: Sonance RS2 (in ceiling)

Speaker settings: ALL speakers set to small

Bass-out: SWFR

X-Over: 60 Hz

Subwoofer: HSU STF-2


Yamaha DSP test setting: straight and 2-channel

SPL meter: RS digital SPL meter


The Problem: While calibrating the sub (using the various methods as seen in the sub forum), I noticed that my mains are still firing at the low frequencies...I can see/hear/feel the C-9 all the way from ~30 Hz on up. I noticed this when I shut the sub off and was still getting low frequency sound (30Hz+). If I turned my mains off as well, then the system was silent. I checked all my settings and they are as listed above, YES, the mains are set to small, sub out only. When I set the mains to large, I hear a gain in the respective test frequency so small/large setting is doing at least something, but it is still allowing the LF to go to the mains (for ref SPL, at 40Hz test tone--small: ~62db, large: ~78db--and for those readings the x-over was at 90Hz)


FWIW, if I jack the x-over to 200Hz(highest the receiver allows), I still get the mains producing an audible tone starting at about 50Hz (as opposed to ~30 with a x-over of 60Hz)


Can anyone, for the love of my sanity, confirm any of this with there speaker setup and a v2500, maybe even a v2400? That is, with your mains (preferably equivalent to mine as possible, but I'll take any results) on only, and settings similar to those above, do you get LF below the x-over out of your mains?


I can understand getting some 70+Hz if the x-over was at 80Hz, but to be getting 30Hz+ from my mains when the x-over is 60Hz (or higher), just doesn't seem right.


Thanks in advance to anyone who takes the time to try to help me out here.
 

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frottage, A crossover is not a brickwall filter but rather a filter with a slope. Sounds to me like your in-room response is around 12db per octave. Example; If you have a 12db per octave crossover set at 80Hz and your getting 90db @ 80, your output will be down 12db at 40hz (78db) and 24 db down (66db) at 20Hz. Crossovers slopes are all over the place, 1st order (6db per octave) 2nt order (12db) 3rd order (18db) and 4th order (Linkwitz-Riley 24db). THX specs an 80Hz crossover, 12db low pass to allow the natural roll off of THX spec speakers below 80Hz and 24 db high pass. 12db speaker +12db crossover = 24 db. Got it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I knew the low pass had a roll off slope, I just didn't expect to be hearing 30Hz test tones with the x-over at 80 and even 90 Hz--it wasn't like my I had the receiver at a high gain. I'll try to take the time and see if I can figure out how much the filter rolls off since my mains seem to be able to extend quite low. Thanks for the additional information, I will sleep better tonight :)
 
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