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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
grandkids coming - lots of tapes to play - would like to subsequently record to DVD- foray into this subject has left me overwhelmed - latest recommendations re: combo unit that will allow dubbing (I don't need tuner - satellite service provides tuner/dvd recorder for TV shows)..just looking to watch tapes while they're here, then record onto DVD
 

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Combos are generally not recommended due to all the problems they incur. Whatever you don't get the Panasonic EZ-48v which is a accident waiting to happen. The Panasonic EA-38v is the tunerless version of the EZ-48v which seems to have less problems. Don't know anything about the Maggy you listed but if it's anything like the Magnavox 2160a you should be OK. Of course it won't have the HDD like the 2160a but that probably won't matter to you. Good luck, wish I had more combos to suggest but they're really a forgotten market for all the people that are looking for a good one.
 

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There are reviews, and then there are reviews. Consumers lose their minds when it comes to DVD recorders: some give terrible reviews to good units simply because they're disappointed DVD recording is harder to do than VHS used to be, and others give five star rave reviews to absolute crap units just because they're incredibly cheap bastards who are thrilled they found a recorder for under $100. If you want honest opinions based on long-term experience, you have to spend the time browsing forums like AVS, even if the info overload seems overwhelming.


The Magnavox ZV427MG9 does not have the greatest reputation, but I've seen worse. Like most other similarly-priced combos out there (many of which come from the same factory under different brand names), it is flimsy and has some serious operational flaws. About all you can say for it is its dirt cheap and will probably make it to the 90 day warranty period. If you're fine with that and willing to gamble you may need to buy another one within the year then go for it. Otherwise, save up a little more and get the Panasonic DMR-EA38 recommended by jjeff: it isn't perfect, none of the combos are nowadays, but its about as good as you can get. One great advantage is it can use both regular DVD and DVD-RAM discs, which are the easiest format for those just now transitioning from VHS (while DVD-RAM is not compatible with all DVD players, nothing beats its simplicity for watch-record-erase timeshifting tasks). Again per jjeff, avoid any "deals" you might find on the DMR-EZ48: it seems attractive but theres a reason its constantly on "special"- its a woefully defective design with a neurotic tuner/timer system. The DMR-EA38 is the same recorder without the crazy-bad tuner, designed for use with cable/satellite boxes, so its much more reliable.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinojd12003 /forum/post/18127416


grandkids coming - lots of tapes to play - would like to subsequently record to DVD- foray into this subject has left me overwhelmed - latest recommendations re: combo unit that will allow dubbing (I don't need tuner - satellite service provides tuner/dvd recorder for TV shows)..just looking to watch tapes while they're here, then record onto DVD

Current "garden variety" combo recorders do not have hard drives. That severely limits the usefulness of combo recorders.


Most users of current model combo recorders find the VHS section is satisfactory for playing videotapes but less than satisfactory for use in a serious project copying videotaped material to DVD. The better alternative is a VCR connected to the input on a DVD recorder or HDD/DVD recorder.

With separate units, a VCR connected to a DVD recorder or HDD/DVD recorder, it's easier to control videotape tracking adjustments or use stabilizers or other devices, if necessary.


With regard to Magnavox combo recorders, I own two of the earlier variants of the current Magnavox ZV457MG9 digital tuner-equipped combo recorder. Those variants are the ZV450MW8 (manufactured in March 2007) and the ZV450MW8A (manufactured in August 2008). These are decent, but overpriced, combo recorders with good ATSC and clear QAM tuners. I have copied a few videotaped recordings directly to DVD with both models. The results were, well, only "satisfactory." The Magnavox ZV457MG9 is similar to the ZV450MW8A model but adds HDMI, a "major" revision requiring a new model number.


I've had much better results in my selective dubbing/copying project (of around 5,200 titles) using Panasonic ES series combo recorders manufactured in 2005 and 2006. I also have experience with later EZ series Panasonic recorders. Do not consider purchasing a Panasonic EZ series combo recorder. See the DMR-EZ48 thread for more information and cautions concerning Panasonic EZ series combo recorders.


My most recent use of the Magnavox ZV450MW8 combo recorder was as the videotape player connected to an input on my Philips 3576 HDD/DVD recorder. With that arrangement I transfered my daughter's circa 1988/1989 VHS camcorder recordings to the hard drive, edited the material and high-speed dubbed the material to DVDs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vinojd12003 /forum/post/18127461


Disregard question - stumbled on one Magnavox ZV427MG9 - reviews tout it highly - any dissenting views/experience?

The Magnavox ZV427MG9 combo recorder is the current tunerless version of the ZV457MG9.


When considering the current field of "garden-variety" combo recorders there is no good reason not to consider the Magnavox 2160, an outstanding Hard Disc Drive/DVD recorder. (The 2160 does not have a VHS mechanism.)


The Magnavox H2160MW9A HDD/DVD recorder is much to be preferred to any current model combo recorders. Again, for copying videotaped material connect a VCR to a 2160 input, transfer the material to the hard drive in real-time, edit the material (if desired) and high-speed dub the material to DVD.


The Magnavox 2160 HDD/DVD recorder may be purchased for as little as $159.99 for "factory refurbished" models (when available) through jr.com and the J&R retail store in New York City, or new models may be purchased for $227 through walmart.com.


There is a learning curve necessary to use some features of the Magnavox 2160. Many purchasers (with the "I don't need no stinkin' Owner's Manual" mentality) give up learning how to use the 2160 and so hundreds of them are returned in almost new condition. Other purchasers make the effort to learn how to use the 2160 but encounter a bug (related to the full-time hard drive recording buffer) in the 2160 "A" model variation. Many return these "A" models without so much as visiting the AVS Forum or reading the customer reviews at walmart.com to find that pressing the remote control's SOURCE button to temporarily select the "L3" setting is the workaround for this bug. Some have difficulties with the clock when the Auto Clock Setting is set to "ON" or the incorrect channel is specified as the clock source.


Magnavox 2160 customer returns have often had little use. Two of my three 2160 "refurbs" arrived in near new condition. Upon arrival one of my 2160 models had been powered on for 9 hours with no laser write time and 14 minutes of laser read time and another had been powered on 12 hours with no laser write time and 6 minutes of laser read time. Another had been powered on 296 hours with 31 minutes of laser write time and 5:08 hours of laser read time indicating that it had been used almost entirely as a DVD player, a "no-no" for those informed users that prefer to use a dedicated DVD player to play DVDs--and doing so prolongs the useful life of the 2160 recorder's laser assembly.


Do some reading--start with the first post in Wajo's sticky thread--the gateway to a wealth of information concerning the Magnavox 2160:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...6#post12244086
 

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Overall I tend to agree completely with DigaDo (and wajo!) that the only recorder worth serious consideration in todays USA market is the Magnavox H2160. Its exclusive feature list (hard drive, the only reliable ATSC tuner/timer) combined with its ridiculous low price ($159 refurb, $229 new) have made it the go-to recommendation for just about anyone looking for a new recorder.


EXCEPT... some folks who come here for advice are quite stubborn and fixated on the false allure of the VHS/DVD combo unit. Sometimes its because they're terrified of wiring up separate DVD and VHS machines, sometimes its because of shelf space considerations, and sometimes they just can't grasp that combo units are marketing hype that really don't do what they're advertised as doing (making "easy" copies of VHS to DVD). Its very hard to refute the superficial appeal of a VHS/DVD combo:I mean, why wouldn't you expect it to be the perfect solution for most people? Unfortunately, they just don't work out in practice, most buyers are horribly disappointed by them, but it would take paragraphs to explain why. These explanations don't go over well, because people desperately want the combo concept, and will insist on buying it anyway. Its the kind of thing you might not be able to understand until you actually try a combo and discover the limitations on your own. The best advice we can give in that case is make sure you buy from a dealer with a liberal return/exchange policy.


The briefest summation of combo units is that they are good for very casual use by those who still have some VHS tapes they like to play occasionally, but otherwise don't really need significant VHS capability. A combo should be thought of as a cheap low-end DVD recorder that just happens to have convenient VHS playback included in the chassis: nothing more. Forget the notion that it must be "easier" to dub VHS onto DVDs with a combo: it isn't, it will make you crazy. The initial effort required to get a good used VCR and hook it up to the Magnavox H2160 will be rewarded a thousand times by day-to-day convenience and quality results. If you only have a very few tapes to dub to DVD, and have a cable/satellite box to use as a tuner, you can make do with the Panasonic EA-38: its the best combo deck left on the current market. (Some here would also suggest the tunerless JVC/LG units, but I think those are riskier than the EA-38 unless you get a huge price break.)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff /forum/post/18127918


Combos are generally not recommended due to all the problems they incur. Whatever you don't get the Panasonic EZ-48v which is a accident waiting to happen. The Panasonic EA-38v is the tunerless version of the EZ-48v which seems to have less problems. Don't know anything about the Maggy you listed but if it's anything like the Magnavox 2160a you should be OK. Of course it won't have the HDD like the 2160a but that probably won't matter to you. Good luck, wish I had more combos to suggest but they're really a forgotten market for all the people that are looking for a good one.

I have the EA 38 and it's been fine for playing back occasional VHS tapes, but not (I found this ironic, since it's a combo unit) ideal for dubbing. The process is a little awkward, but it'll do in a pinch. It seems sensitive to copy protection, so it's best for dubs of material you made yourself,such as tv recordings. If you intend to convert commercial VHS tapes, I'd say you may want to look elsewhere. The DVD recorder/player is okay , too -- when I first got it it locked up occasionally (it just goes comatose, you cant start it you cant turn it off, it just stops) That hasnt happened recently (maybe because I'm using better/slower media now?) There's a reset button under a drop down plastic 'door' on the front panel that usually will wake it up ( I didn't know about that at first, so ended up unplugging the unit when it froze when I first got it, which ws kind of a pain.) Not sure if it's behaving better, or I'm just not using it much (because I got a few Magnavox 2160s - much preferred) I mostly use it for DVD-RAM.


As everyone has said, there are no VHS machines on the market anymore, so you almost have to get a combo or a refurb. This panny is most definitely much better than the more recent ones. Another nice feature- it also has an IR blaster so you can control other equipment remotely (for example,I used to use it for my Zenith CECB before I took it out of service, and I'm pretty sure it will work with Channel Master). You just have to figure out the remote codes. Folks around here were very helpful and offered tips about setting up the IR blaster when I first got mine (thanks JJeff!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for the time, effort and thoughtfulness you put into your replies. I will keep these as reference for the future. I purchased the Magnavox unit and got it set up w/o much effort and tried a quick dubbing from a family VHS to DVD - and it worked ok because main focus was to have a VHS player for grandkids visit (to watch Disney tapes we have) and to be able to dub family tapes to DVD for preservation. Now see that for the large-scale dubbing of the many tapes I have, I'll need the units y'all suggested...and will spring for those eventually. Really appreciate the education you folks rendered...amazing information. Thank you
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinojd12003 /forum/post/18132538


Thank you all for the time, effort and thoughtfulness you put into your replies. I will keep these as reference for the future. I purchased the Magnavox unit and got it set up w/o much effort and tried a quick dubbing from a family VHS to DVD - and it worked ok because main focus was to have a VHS player for grandkids visit (to watch Disney tapes we have) and to be able to dub family tapes to DVD for preservation. Now see that for the large-scale dubbing of the many tapes I have, I'll need the units y'all suggested...and will spring for those eventually. Really appreciate the education you folks rendered...amazing information. Thank you

If you intend copying commercially produced videotapes these might require that a video stabilizer be inserted between the VHS output and the recorder input as mentioned earlier:

"With separate units, a VCR connected to a DVD recorder or HDD/DVD recorder, it's easier to control videotape tracking adjustments or use stabilizers or other devices, if necessary."


Perhaps I should clarify that "commercially produced videotapes" are those produced for retail sale, e.g., pre-recorded Disney movies and cartoons.


When I mentioned my dubbing project of around 5,200 titles these are home-recorded titles that I recorded myself from cable or broadcast stations. Perhaps less than half a dozen are copies of "commercially produced videotapes."


When I mention the outstanding Panasonic ES series combo recorder models of 2005 and 2006 I am referring to the DMR-ES30V, DMR-ES35V, DMR-ES45V and DMR-ES46V. The Panasonic EH hard disc drive series are also outstanding products, with special mention of the 2006 DMR-EH75, a combo unit with VHS/HDD/DVD.


When I mention problematic Panasonic EZ series combo recorders I am referring to the 2007 and newer DMR-EZ37V, DMR-EZ47V, DMR-EZ475, DMR-EZ48V and DMR-EZ485V models. The prototype for the EZ series combo recorders was the dreadful 2005 DMR-ES40V. These models should be avoided.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear /forum/post/18129291


EXCEPT... some folks who come here for advice are quite stubborn and fixated on the false allure of the VHS/DVD combo unit. Sometimes its because they're terrified of wiring up separate DVD and VHS machines, sometimes its because of shelf space considerations, and sometimes they just can't grasp that combo units are marketing hype that really don't do what they're advertised as doing (making "easy" copies of VHS to DVD). ............. people desperately want the combo concept, and will insist on buying it anyway. Its the kind of thing you might not be able to understand until you actually try a combo and discover the limitations on your own.

There isn't a cure for stubborn (or stupid).



Anyway, all a combo unit really does it play VHS tapes to the TV, not to a new DVD copy.


You need 3 essential basic pieces to convert VHS to DVD
  1. Good VCR
  2. Timebase corrector -or- one of those "filter" devices (note: these toys only work about half the time at best) --- these remove copyguard detection (yes, even on homemade tapes that don't have it, because over-sensitive DVD recorders see anti-copy where none exists)
  3. Good DVD recorder , preferably one that can filter the signal quality
  • 1 and 3 give you a good picture,
  • 3 doesn't add blocks and digital noise - (translation: your DVDs won't look like bad Youtube quality)
  • 2 makes sure the process even works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
To Lordsmurf: did need the vcr anyway to play tapes for grandkids & really had no frame of reference or resources to find/buy 'good, used VCR' as someone else suggested; also only intend to copy home movies for historical preservation, not commercially produced (aka Disney) tapes - appreciate your 'helpful' advice, didn't appreciate the insult...it's what has kept me from such forums - the elitist attitudes of some of the participants who live,eat, breathe this stuff but have no tolerance for those of us who don't, yet come here to ask advice...we're not being stubborn nor stupid, just making a decision that makes sense for us for the moment - that we don't follow your suggestion doesn't warrant insulting us...a little kindness goes a long way


To DigaDo - thank you for all th esuggestions - when I sumon the courage to jump into this to copy all my 'home movies' - I'll look into all this stuff.for now the combo will suffice for watching tapes
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinojd12003 /forum/post/18154424


To Lordsmurf: did need the vcr anyway to play tapes for grandkids & really had no frame of reference or resources to find/buy 'good, used VCR' as someone else suggested; also only intend to copy home movies for historical preservation, not commercially produced (aka Disney) tapes - appreciate your 'helpful' advice, didn't appreciate the insult...it's what has kept me from such forums - the elitist attitudes of some of the participants who live,eat, breathe this stuff but have no tolerance for those of us who don't, yet come here to ask advice...we're not being stubborn nor stupid, just making a decision that makes sense for us for the moment - that we don't follow your suggestion doesn't warrant insulting us...a little kindness goes a long way


To DigaDo - thank you for all th esuggestions - when I sumon the courage to jump into this to copy all my 'home movies' - I'll look into all this stuff.for now the combo will suffice for watching tapes

The real issue, as I'm sure you have figured out, is that there are no new decent VHS players being manufactured anymore, by anyone. The only devices that are on the shelves are combo units, and they are normally poorly constructed.


Since I very seriously recommend you use separate units, I can say that during my extensive tape to disk transfer projext, I used one of these quite often, and it did a completely acceptable job. It is a player only, but as I said I strongly recommend separate units. As a player, it's not too bad. It does a fair job with DVDs too. It will play PAL disks, and convert them to NTSC. At least, mine does. Mine is the black version, not the silver.
 

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I agree that the combo units are pretty much garbage, although to be fair most consumer standalone VCRs during the last few years were also garbage. Given that watching kids videos seem to tax VCRs more than most other video viewing, I'd look for a sturdy used model. It'll work out better in the long run, even if it isn't quite as easy as just buying a combo.


I'm sure the Magnavox you bought will work for awhile, though. If it fails during the warranty period, take it back and browse eBay. We can give you lots of choices for sturdy used ones.
 

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The VCR mechanisms in the combo units don't hold up worth a darn because they're built to meet a low price point. Nobody, except a few enthusiasts like us, wants to shell out serious change for a VCR. I've read (maybe on this forum) that there's only one company left (in China, of course) that even makes the mechanism.


My brother got a couple of Sony VHS/DVD player combo units, and thought he was set for as long as he was with his original VCR. Not so. Although the VHS sections gave him no trouble with recording OTA for time-shifting, one died within a year or two.


If you have an extensive collection of VHS and want to keep playing it for a few more years, I recommend a late-model Mitsubishi VCR, say a U448 or U748 (basically just an S-VHS 448 with the added bonus of an S-video output jack on the back panel in addition to the usual composites). For a while, you could find clean, lightly used examples on eBay for the price of lunch. Lately, I've seen prices going up a bit, probably as people's VCRs die and they discover the used market it their only option. Still, bargains are not hard to find.
 

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There was a 748 on eBay for $40, and it's probably still there. I thought about snagging it for a spare (I already have one 748 for occasional VHS use) but then I reconsidered since I don't use my own THAT often.


They usually are sans remote, but you can get spare remotes off of eBay, or just use a universal remote (although on my Harmony 550, I couldn't change the clock.)


edit: Just checked, the 748 is gone.
Some 448s still around, but pricier than they have been.
 

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vinojd12003, I meant no offense in my posts, apologies if you got that impression. I wasn't criticizing people for wanting combo recorders: they seem very appealing because of the concept and marketing, and you would have no way of knowing the disappointing flaws unless you had tried one (or more than one). I was trying to say people won't always listen to advice they get here to avoid them, and sometimes the best we can do is suggest buying from a dealer with wide choice and a no-questions exchange policy.


The combos do work for some people, but it depends on your budget, your needs, and which one you buy. They are primarily DVD recorders for recording television signals, with a cheap VCR thrown in for playing your old tapes. If thats all you need, you can be quite happy with a Magnavox combo or the Panasonic EA-38 (I wouldn't suggest any others- the Toshibas especially are just re-branded Magnavoxes at a higher price). But if you have more than a dozen tapes to convert to DVD, you'll run up against various limitations in a combo. For one thing, the VCR part is often not that good at tracking old tapes, for another these machines aften make you "fly blind": its really hard to tell exactly what you're doing when trying to copy a tape. If you just push the automatic button to copy the entire tape in one pass, and you're OK with the kinda-lame DVD that results, then a combo is a nifty compact little device. But if you need to make any trims, want to cut out commercials, add chapter marks to get to your favorite scenes or episodes, or put parts of several tapes together to make one DVD, then a combo will disappoint.


We get a lot of blowback here from consumers who say they're broke and on a very tight budget. This is an important factor, but even those on tight budgets can put together a better system than most combo decks for the same or just slightly more money. Unless the combo you find is under $100, it isn't really saving you major money over the cost of good separates. The average combo today sells in the $150 range, if it includes a tuner/timer its almost always flaky and undependable for timer recording due to issues in our new digital broadcasts (cable or off-air). It will be hard to use and the VCR won't be too good, the VCR may even break very quickly.


A much better choice for almost anyone would be the Magnavox H2160, available for $159 including free shipping from J&R if you track their website and catch it in stock. This model has the most reliable timer in a current recorder, includes a decent digital tuner, and is the only US model with a hard drive. The hard drive lets you avoid the hassle of eraseable DVDs for simple watch-and-erase recordings, and it allows easy editing of your VHS copies before making the actual DVD. You connect your VHS deck to the Magnavox H2160 and record your tapes to its hard drive section, when finished you can go in and easily cut out commercials or mix and match pieces from different tapes (the hard drive can hold the contents of roughly two dozen VHS tapes). When you have things arranged the way you want, the machine will make a DVD copy from the hard drive in about 18 mins. You can't imagine how wonderful and amazing these features are until you use them.


Getting a good used VCR is much easier than most people think: there are TONS of them out there. Ask around to friends, relatives, coworkers: almost everyone has at least one VCR sitting around unused in the bedroom or spare room. Ask, and they'll probably just give it to you free. The best ones to get "free" or very cheap are Panasonic or Quasar models made before 2001 (check the date on the back panel). Sharp vcrs were almost all excellent, those are also easily found for near-nothing. If you can't get one from a friend, check your local Craig's List or Goodwill or Salvation Army- scads of Panasonic or Sharp VCRs can be found for a $20 bill. If you want an even more solid, bulletproof VCR you might look around for the Mitsubishi (MGA) 448/449 or 748/749 recommended earlier by doswonk1. These are somewhat less common, because they were the very last good VCRs to be sold new back around 2000-2001 (by then even Panasonic was making garbage VCRs). The easiest place to find the Mitsubishis is eBay, where they sell from $35-75.


Total outlay for the phenomenal Magnavox H2160 DVD/Hard Drive recorder plus a really good used VCR is $159-250 depending on how much you pay for the Magnavox and how much (if anything) you pay for the used VCR. Unless you're truly dead-on-your-ass broke, this is a much better investment than the combo: the separate VCR should last nearly forever, and the hard drive feature in the Magnavox puts much less wear and tear on the DVD burner than in a VHS/DVD combo, again doubling the useful life of the recorder. Worth considering as part of your decision. The one area where the combo unit excels is space saving and convenient playback of either DVD or VHS at whim with one remote. If this is more important than anything else, then a combo makes sense. But if you have any plans for heavy recording or working extensively with tapes, give separates a chance.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by doswonk1 /forum/post/18161263


The VCR mechanisms in the combo units don't hold up worth a darn because they're built to meet a low price point. Nobody, except a few enthusiasts like us, wants to shell out serious change for a VCR. I've read (maybe on this forum) that there's only one company left (in China, of course) that even makes the mechanism.

I've snapped hundreds of photos of the innards of my many DVD Recorders but very few showing the VHS mechanisms in combo machines.


Attached are a few photos that may allow some comparisons.


The first photo is an above view of the VHS mechanism in an Emerson (Funai) EWD2204 VCR/DVD player manufactured in June 2004. The second photo is a view from the left of the VHS mechanism in a Sylvania (Funai) ZV450SL8 combo recorder manufactured in April 2007. The third photo shows a portion of the VHS mechanism in a Magnavox (Funai) ZV450MW8A combo recorder manufactured in August 2008. The fourth photo is a rear view of the VHS mechanism in a Panasonic DMR-ES35V combo recorder manufactured in February 2006. The fifth photo is an above view of the VHS mechanism in the same DMR-ES35V.


While VHS mechanisms necessarily share a number of design similarities it appears that the Funai VHS mechanisms share many design details across the Emerson, Sylvania and Magnavox brand names. The Panasonic VHS mechanism differs from the Funai design in many details.




 

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Good advice from Citibear, as usual. One thing we (frequenters of this forum) have to keep in mind is that there are people who are satisfied with just racking a tape in the VCR side of a combo and letting it record nonstop to a DVD. They don't want to slice and dice and edit and menu-ize, and do all the things we find our HDD DVDRs indispensable for.


Some years ago, I worked with a guy who bought a CD recorder to make CD copies of a whole bunch of Mini Discs he had because he bought into Sony's hype before the MD format died a quiet, unlamented death. He just plugged the output of the MD machine to the input of the CD recorder and let it rip, without bothering to put in track breaks. He ended up with hundreds of CDs, each with of one, unbroken ca. 80-minute track. As somebody who's spent thousands of hours monitoring recordings to put in track breaks between separate works, between movements, etc., I though the guy was daft. But he was totally happy with the results.


Final note: While the older, but not too old, VCRs are more robust than the currently available VHS sections of combo machines, they're not indestructible. My externally blemishless Mistu HS-U748 purchased new in June 2003 finally gave up the ghost. True, I had used it pretty heavily until 2008, but not as heavily as my HS-U580 of 1998, which is still kicking. Since the 748's failure wasn't mechanical but appears to be something to do with the motherboard, I suspect the periodic "surginess" of the local power supply had something to do with it. Anyway, people who still want to use VHS on a daily basis have to be prepared to be increasingly creative to keep a working, reliable machine on hand. Even the newest standalone VCRs are now--what?--4 or 5 years old.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinojd12003 /forum/post/18154424


To Lordsmurf: did need the vcr anyway to play tapes for grandkids & really had no frame of reference or resources to find/buy 'good, used VCR' as someone else suggested; also only intend to copy home movies for historical preservation, not commercially produced (aka Disney) tapes - appreciate your 'helpful' advice, didn't appreciate the insult...it's what has kept me from such forums - the elitist attitudes of some of the participants who live,eat, breathe this stuff but have no tolerance for those of us who don't, yet come here to ask advice...we're not being stubborn nor stupid, just making a decision that makes sense for us for the moment - that we don't follow your suggestion doesn't warrant insulting us...a little kindness goes a long way

I make no apologies for my style. Increasingly forums are seeing people not ask for advice, but attempt to pander for confirmation that their bad idea is a good one. You often see the same folks roaming forum to forum, until somebody equally clueless says "yes, that's a great idea!" Citibear was addressing this problem, and I was agreeing with him. It had nothing to do with you.


The advice below that comment, however, was for you -- the 1-2-3 step information.

Quote:
Originally Posted by doswonk1 /forum/post/18165058


Good advice from Citibear, as usual. One thing we (frequenters of this forum) have to keep in mind is that there are people who are satisfied with just racking a tape in the VCR side of a combo and letting it record nonstop to a DVD. They don't want to slice and dice and edit and menu-ize, and do all the things we find our HDD DVDRs indispensable for.

My problem comes from the people who are amateur distributors.


For example, the cheapskate who butchers the entire family archive of home movies, throws away the original tapes (!!!), and gives everybody in the family a piece-of-crap DVD, full of video with tracking errors, audio buzzing, etc. I see this kind of thing regularly. It's pathetic. The tapes could have looked/sounded so much better in a good VCR, using a good DVD recorder. And then a good Verbatim or TY disc would have been better than the Memorex or store-brand blank.


These are the people that need a good smack to the back of the head. They're ruining it for others. It wouldn't be an issue if they were the only ones that had to listen/view their own garbage.


Sad.
 

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Forum-ites;

I'm new to this forum but glad I found it. It appears there is the potential for some good info. This forum caught my attention first.

Here's the deal; I've actually worked in the 'biz' for over 30 years as a producer/director/writer and now find it time to preserve my 'body of work' if you will. It exists on vhs, BetaSP, and some on DVDs - no home movies or commercial titles etc. I am burning the BetaSP footage to DVDs. It's the vhs stuff (close to 700 tapes) that I want to get preserved. Engineers, techs, and video editors I have asked have been helpful but some of their ideas about a method are almost getting into buying racks and building a master control suite. Gotta love those engineers don't you - the necessary geniuses in our business.

I'm off the 'combo' wagon after watching six units expire within one year. I have a Mitsubishi 446 vhs 'battleship' that is still very alive and kicking. I'm intrigued by the idea of going from vhs to something with a hard drive and DVD recorder for some possible editing capability. I may also want to copy some of the DVDs. I have a Panny DVD box (player only).

Do I really need a time base corrector or routing system? Can I use an HDD/DVD unit with my MAC and a simple edit program? Or can you make simple edits on the HDD/DVD? Remember I was on the creative side of the business, but I'm not tech-averse. Help get me from the 446 to a finished DVD. As a producer/director, I have ideas but I need gear that works.

Thanks...I'll be in my trailer.
 
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