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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This may sound simple enough, but let me throw this by everyone and let me know if I'm wrong. I want to copy a vhs tape onto my replaytv:


Can I take the VCR coaxial output and pipe it into the RTV CATV input? Then just use a manual record tuned to channel 3?


Thx,

SF
 

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Assuming your VCR has composite outputs, you're better off using them instead of the RF-out.

Connect them to Input 1 or 2 on your ReplayTV and set them up as "Other" in the Setup.

When ready to record, just set the Replay to the proper "Input" and you're all set to go.

Keep in mind if the video comming out of the VCR isn't clean, your Replay may exhibit the "No Signal" blue screen.
 

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Should work fine. I used the second input for a video camera in the basement and can now not only monitor the kids from upstairs, I can even use the instant replay feature to see who did what to whom when crying erupts :) Replay starts recording as soon as I switch to input 2 - it sees it as live TV. I almost feel guilty using this level of sophisticated tech to catch em red-handed but it makes for some pretty funny viewing at times :)
 

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but listen to what jvidalny told you. VCR output can be unstable enough so that the Replay will not accept it. The signal loss may be severe enough so that you wind up with gaps all over your program. The only sure way to ensure reliable transfers is through a Time Base Corrector. Some high end JVC VCRs have that built-in.
 

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I think a time base corrector would be more help than a signal booster.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think there's any problem with the signal amplitude coming out of your average VCR's coax out (or composite/audio outs). The problem is in the stability of the video signal itself, and VCRs are notorious for producing crap signals.


Which is where a time base corrector comes in. My JVC S-VHS has one. Seems to make a much more stable picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
RandyL712 wins.


The VCR signal is strong enough but my Panasonic 2000 gives me a warning about copy protection and does not allow recording.


I paid retail for this VHS tape and should have the right to make a personal copy. Its not even a movie, its a boring instructional video and wanted the convinience of replay's features while viewing.


I understand the need to reduce bootlegging, but do you really think bootleggers use Panasonic PVRs for this?


Any way around the copy protection?
 

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Oh, you gotta love that ad. "Great for use with DVDs" (as if the quality of a DVD's output was ever questionable), followed by the disclaimer that copying stuff is illegal, so don't do it.
 

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My personal feelings are that Panasonic has every right and my support to prevent the recording of copyrighted data, except over a cable line or something. But, it can't tell if the copyrighted show is from HBO or your DVD player playing back the newest DVD, so they chose to block it all to block the latter. A good decision? No. A well intentioned decision? Definatley. I don't have a problem with these machines NOT letting me record a DVD onto it. You can fight for the rights of the time shifter, but these devices are designed to record TV.
 

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However Toots is quite right. While a booster may increase signal strength so the Macrovision bug is avoided, the time base instability will still apply, even with a strong signal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This issue reminds me of the Gun Control issue. Rules created to deter criminals from getting guns, but criminals don't follow legal channels to get guns in the first place. So the rules only make it more difficult for upstanding citizens from getting guns.


That color corrector costs $169. I can't justify the cost to copy a few 60 mins VHS tapes for personal use, but a bootlegger can justify the cost when making 1000 illegal copies of the same tape.


Do the CEOs of these movie studios really think they are protecting themselves from a black market?


All I know is that the home viewer is the one screwed in the end.
 

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The movie studios consider this to be a separate issue from large-scale pirating.


They do hunt down and prosecute the big video pirates, but that's irrelevant.


Macrovision, CSS, DRM and their ilk are not aimed at the big criminals; they're aimed squarely at the end consumer.


The studios and publishing houses believe that you should have to pay a royalty each time you watch, listen to or read some copyrighted material. So far, their efforts to achieve this have met with some serious market resistance (and let's keep up the good fight), but that's not going to stop them from doing what they can to enforce this vision.


It sounds as if Macrovision is working just fine: Not a serious deterrent to someone who's really interested in copying something, but it has stopped one more casual duplication of something.


No, they don't think they're protecting themselves from a black market. They just plan on squeezing the end consumer until they reach their dream of pay-per-view on everything.
 

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Let's be realistic here. These studios aren't the devil. Neither was DIVX. Or Macrovision. These companies are all out to make as much money as they can, and can we honestly say that their ideas of PPV don't further that goal?
 
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