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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking at upgrading my old VCR for my totally dedicated HT room. Woundering if people can tell me what to look for in a new VCR? This VCR will only be used for HT purpose. I would like to stay under $500.00 for sure.
 

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JVC's HR-S7800U or HR-S9800U S-VHS VCRs are in your price range. They're the top of their consumer line. With builtin time-base-correctors, they produce excellent s-video images. Model numbers change annually. The current ones might be 7900 and 9900.
 

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Bung583


Let me add something to think about. I bought the S9800 S-VHS PRIOR to getting all the components for my HT system. Yeah, it looked better than the previous VCR on the old Sony FPTV.


Now that I have a plasma display and true digital cable with hi def channels -- we're having a LOT of trouble getting it hooked up. If I do the cable split as previously done with analog cable, I introduce noise into the digital line even using the new greater bandwidth splitters. We can't tape with the cable running through the cable box first and then to the VCR, despite having followed the manual's instructions to the letter. I haven't been able to determine why, despite having asked numerous TWC technicians.


We're considering moving the S-VHS but that means we would have to watch the better-quality time-shifted tapes on the old Sony. Watching stuff taped on the old VCR on the S-VHS connected to the plasma is so ghastly you really don't want to know.


So, my advice is to consider what you're going to be getting and how you're going to be able to successfully wire it together. Then, decide if you want VHS or something in the TIVO line.

Leslie
 

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JVC 7800 or 9800/9900 is your best bet. Great picture. I bought a 7800 and its great.
 

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Leslie wrote
Quote:
If I do the cable split as previously done with analog cable, I introduce noise into the digital line even using the new greater bandwidth splitters.
Are your splitters before the STB?

If so, that suggests to me that the cable company is delivering a much weaker signal than previously. You might need a broadband video amplifier.

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We can't tape with the cable running through the cable box first and then to the VCR, despite having followed the manual's instructions to the letter.
Are you using an SA Explorer 2000 STB?

My understanding is that Scientific Atlanta has been having a lot of trouble producing the HD versions. Apparently their quality control has been extremely poor. That might be one source of problems.


Also, with the standard definition version (what I have) only the channel the STB is tuned to is available on the STB's RF output. This is probably true for the HD version, too. An optional external relay is needed to bypass the STB if you want to record one of the unencrypted analog channels while using the STB to watch something else.


Alternatively, you can connect the CATV RF cable to the VCR's RF input and connect the VCR's RF output to the STB. That's what I do. I haven't seen any degredation of any of the CATV video (or music) channels.
Quote:
We're considering moving the S-VHS but that means we would have to watch the better-quality time-shifted tapes on the old Sony. Watching stuff taped on the old VCR on the S-VHS connected to the plasma is so ghastly you really don't want to know.
It isn't clear to me what you mean by "moving the S-VHS", since there are so many different ways it can be connected to a sophisticated A/V system.


Have you tried cleaning the Sony?

Crud that has accumulated on the heads and guide posts can cause lots of problems: reduced video signal level, timing variations, tape edge damage, etc.

Quote:
So, my advice is to consider what you're going to be getting and how you're going to be able to successfully wire it together. Then, decide if you want VHS or something in the TIVO line.
Of course, you still need a VCR if you want to archive a show the TIVO has captured for you.
 

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Which Sony VCR do you have?


JVC's high end consumer S-VHS VCRs (HR-S7x00U & HR-S9x00U) include a full-frame time base corrector as well as other features which make them appropriate for use in a HomeTheater system. They list for about $400-$500.


As I recall, the functionally equivalent VCR from Sony (SLV-R1000) lists for about $1,200. Its mechanical quality is much better, though. Unfortunately it has disappeared from Sony's consumer electronics Web pages: I can't find any S-VHS VCRs listed at all.


Of course, you could invest in a Sony professional grade S-VHS VCR, but that'd be a *lot* more expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ok, with being able to purchase the s7800u for $219.99 and the s9800u for $349.99, is it worth it to purchase the S9800U? What advantages will the 9800 have over the 7800 and is it worth the additional money?
 

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sorry: I can't comment. I have no personal experience with 9x00 VCRs. I bought a 7600 quite some time ago when prices were higher. I've never seen any discussion of what the 9x00 does with double the tbc memory of the 7x00, for example. The one comment I have seen is that 9x00 VCRs include video echo cancellation circuits which are useful in some over-the-air situations and some cable systems.
 
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