AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I believe this is a Sony TV feature, as I have had it on my last two sets. It comes in four flavors; off, low, medium, and high. My question is...


What does it really do?


It looks as though it draws black lines around all edges, creating the illusion of a higher resolution, but also appears to distort the size and in some cases the shape of the source. Is this setting recommended for videophile purposes, and what does everyone else do with it while calibrating with Avia or VE?


If anyone has any knowledge of this feature please help, because I'm driving myself crazy adjusting the settings with various media...:(

*UPDATE*Thanks for the comprehensive response, this is the proof I need to shut my buddy up who always insists that my VM should be On, while I always tell him its "artificial" and I prefer it Off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
The idea behind scan velocity modulation is that you need more resolution around the edges of objects than in the middles. That's because in the middle you're probably drawing the same color, or similar colors. So the differences aren't that important, visually. It's at the sharp boundaries that you want really crisp distinctions. Switching times on the guns are constant, so if you slow down the beam around rapid color changes and speed it up (to compensate) over patches of constant or slowly changing color, you might be able to get a better looking image. Of course, that involves doing some image processing. (You have to figure out where the high contrast zones are ahead of time.) And image processing is hard to do cleanly. Most self-proclaimed "videophiles" suggest turning it off, since the "enhancement" is somewhat artificial, espescially if you know what you're looking for (fine detail can be lost), but as always you should play with it to see what you think looks best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
SVM or SVE or VSM or VM (or whatever the pest is called by its respective manufacturer) produces those annoying artificial outlines around hard edged objetcs, or when there is a high contrast between objects (dark figure against a light sky). I turn this sucker off when calibrating and LEAVE ot off. I'm not a self-proclaimed videophile, but I don't like what it does to the picture.


The larger the screen, the more obvious and annoying the SVM artifacts. On a fairly small screen, the loss of detail and rings aren't as noticeable. But once you know what SVM is, you tend to notice it all the time.


If the picture seems too soft on SD programming, try VM on low. But why would you calibrate your set with Avia or VE and then enable a process that distorts the picture?


Glad you've retained bragging rights!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,403 Posts
I would like to disable the SVM but I am phisically 'unable' to move the F-38310 to get the back off (10 screws) to get in to pull a wire from it's connection. Check with the calibration web page that's in my signature space on evry post. Their are artices on SVM its use and its weakness's.

:)
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top