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Discussion Starter #1
Maybe I'll get lucky and an actual AVR tech/repair professional will see this:

I'm positive my Denon AVR has a faulty front right channel. It's outputting less low end frequencies than the others.

My speaker is hooked up with the most commonly used main speaker wire posts.

If I were to get an external power amp (so I could hook to pre out) and use that instead for said speaker, do you think my low output would go away?

Or is the issue deeper in AVR and will likely happen regardless of what output I use?
 

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you need to troubleshoot. presumably your sense that low frequencies are depressed in one channel is based on how the speakers sound in the room. So, if you reverse the speaker connections (left channel to right speaker, right channel to left speaker) you will presumably hear whether the difference you perceive comes from the AVR (because the lower low frequencies will be in the opposite speaker all of a sudden) or in the speaker (because the amp channel that was fine with one speaker is not fine with the other. If it's the latter, then you can move the speakers themselves, to see if the problem is in the speaker, or because of the relatively huge differences that can occur if one speaker is near a corner, say, and the other is next to a big opening into an adjacent room.

Once you identify the actual source of the difference you hear (actually, preferably, with appropriate test tones and a measurement device - even my inexpensive SPL meter will work if I'm just comparing, because however inaccurate my particular device is, it's equally inaccurate whichever speaker I am testing, and all I want to know is if they test the same) you can figure out what to do. If, as is likely, it's the speakers themselves, you can get one fixed. If it's speaker positions, you can determine whether there is a way to place them so that they are in a more consistent acoustic space. If it seems to be in the electronics, well, no telling. IDK what could be wrong with the power amp module that would cause it to roll off the bass, but substituting an outboard amp (that you could return) would tell you. If the outboard amp dosnt' fi the problem, it's not a power amp problem. If that's not it, then it's something in the preamp section of the receiver. EQ might fix it, or might not.
 

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Did you run a frequency sweep, with one channel active at a time? That would help you be sure if you have not. If you had a separate pre out, and could borrow an amp from a friend or buy some cheapo amp somewhere, you could isolate whether it's the amp out or preout
 
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Discussion Starter #4
It's the channel that's messed up. I've switched cables, used high end SPL meter and ran sweeps with XTZ room analyzer.

I'm hoping issue will be resolved using pre out to hook up. But I don't know if pre outs have a seperate module driving the channel than the speaker terminal for same channel.
 

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Not outputting just LF is a little strange, perhaps a bad coupling capacitor, power supply problem, or defective power amp module (bias etc.) Shouldn't you just get the AVR fixed?

Assuming you have walked through the usual checklist and determined it is in the AVR and not the cable, speaker, or room, then without running tests there is no way to tell if the roll-off is in the preamp stages or amp stages. If you SPL meter has a line input, you could run some test tones through the system and check the preamp out and speaker out to verify the preamp does not exhibit the LF rolloff. Put in e.g. a 1 kHz signal and compare it to a 100 Hz signal at both places.

HTH - Don
 
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Just to be doggedly whatever I am, if you have not physically switched the speakers, I mean move the left speaker to where the right speaker sits and vice versa, try that. A 10 dB differebce in the low end is not unusual based on room placement, aiui. Then, as indicated above, if it is messed up, get the receiver fixed. Sadly if it is out of warranty, may be cheaper to replace the whole thing . .
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just to be doggedly whatever I am, if you have not physically switched the speakers, I mean move the left speaker to where the right speaker sits and vice versa, try that. A 10 dB differebce in the low end is not unusual based on room placement, aiui. Then, as indicated above, if it is messed up, get the receiver fixed. Sadly if it is out of warranty, may be cheaper to replace the whole thing . .
I thought of this, since question speaker is corner loaded. So I switched the left and right speaker wires at speaker end... Same think occurred in new speaker.

My speakers have four passive bass radiators so I can feel by touch that the one is giving off less bass.

Could this be an issue - I have one wall socket behind TV. But I have lots of toys to plug in. So I used two outlet bars that each have like 7 outlets... I have at any given time running: 70" TV, cable box, AVR, modem, router, satellite receiver module for rears, minidsp, HSU subwoofer.

Everything works fine, but could they somehow be getting 'less' power?
 

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Everything works fine, but could they somehow be getting 'less' power?
I would rate that 'unlikely'.

--

Simplistic test:

Plug an incandescent lamp (if you still have one) into the suspect unused sockets on your power arrangement, see if it looks dim, or dims while your system is playing.

Momentary dimming at initial equipment power-on may occur and could be expected.
 
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