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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
"VHF/UHF Isolation Network - prevents the two types of TV signals from interfering with each other. This results in

cleaner signals and better pictures on your TV"


Does the above statement mean that there are 2 leads? ( one for UHF and one for VHF)


I'm looking for a rooftop antenna VHF/UHF (with or without FM no big deal) to pick up both digital and analog.


From 17 to 30 miles (i have pretty much of a clear view) so a directional antenna is what i'm looking for.


I'm looking for one that has separate leads for VHF and UHF.


PS: I did a search but ,nothing came up on separate leads for VHF and UHF antenna's.


Thanks so much


Blue


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"GOD BLESS AMERICA"


[This message has been edited by Blue Rain (edited 09-27-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Anyone?


I'm not too savvy about antenna's so any help would be nice.


Thanks so much


Blue


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i have no idea, but i would like to hear about this myself. having some problems with that same exact thing lately, i wouldn't think that it would matter being that they are carried on different wavelengths? I could be (and probably am wrong, heh)

good luck


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-coop
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A VHF/UHF combo antenna needs only one downlead carrying signals from both the VHF and UHF bands together. Some older TV sets have seperate VHF and UHF antenna inputs but most modern TV sets have one or more antenna inputs that each accept the combined VHF and UHF signals and split them up internally to feed the VHF and UHF tuners in the set (or set top box tuners.)


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HiDefDave
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So what do they mean by this, i'm curious.


"VHF/UHF Isolation Network - prevents the two types of TV signals from interfering with each other. This results in

cleaner signals and better pictures on your TV"


I went on my roof to check other antenna's and i noticed some have 2 leads.


I just thought this was better than having one lead.


Still learning :>



Thanks Coop and Dave : >


Blue


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"GOD BLESS AMERICA"


[This message has been edited by Blue Rain (edited 09-28-2001).]
 

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I recently purchased a Radio Shack roof top antenna for $25.00, a 5' mast for $8.00 and a tripod mount for $25.00. I use it strictly for local VHF (90 mile range...actual transmit towers are approx 20 miles away) as western new york will not have OTA hi definition signal until November of this year. Picture clarity (signal) is better than that over Dish Network abc,cbs,nbc (except of course cbsHD).


I don't need a rotor because all of the transmitting towers (that I'm interested in) are in the same general direction from my house.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
coop


You said: "i wouldn't think that it would matter being that they are carried on different wavelengths"


Yes i assumed that also ,but i notice i do pick up some VHF signals with a UHF antenna and vice a versa.


So my way of thinking would be to get separate leads to pick up the strongest signal for each.


Listen, i know nothing about these things .I'm just guessing here.


If someone can clear this up for me, please jump in .


Thanks


Blue




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"GOD BLESS AMERICA"
 

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If you use a combo VHF/UHF antenna with a single lead, there is no problem in having both the VHF and UHF signals on the same cable connecting to the single VHF/UHF antenna input on the television. The difference in wavelength is not of significance and all of the signals can indeed travel along the same cable without interference. After all, the VHF band includes television, FM and other transmissions, and all these co-exist in the cable.


You would need separate leads of course, if if you used separate antennas for VHF and UHF, and you would need to combine them with a VHF/UHF combiner to get them both into the tv antenna input.


One other thing to remember is that the signal loss in the cable increases at higher frequencies, so for best results at UHF, be sure to use low loss cable if you have a long cable run. Hope this helps.


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George Waters
 

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Life gets REAL complicated using 2 different antennas (I'm currently using a VHF/FM (CM 3614) and a dedicated UHF (CM3021). I don't see any problems on MY local station regarding VHF stations being received on the UHF antenna, however, it's my biggest problem the other way (I DO receive at least lower band UHF on the VHF antenna), causing the typical multipath problems. I've gone to putting _3_ low Pass filters, and it STILL doesn't completely block channel 17 yet.


If you can get by with a single, combination antenna, I would strongly recommend doing it that way. You can find pre-amps for one band that pass thru the other if you only have a problem with one band.


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You CAN put antennas on your owned and/or controlled property...

http://www.fcc.gov/csb/facts/otard.html
 

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If you use separate VHF and UHF antennae and you need/want a preamplifier, there may be a solution. The Channelmaster 7777 is a low noise, high gain preamp that has separate inputs for VHF and UHF. The 7777 usually does a pretty good job of accepting only the VHF frequencies from the VHF antenna and the UHF signals from the UHF antenna. Keep the coax feeds from the antennas to the preamp as short as possible to prevent the coax going in the preamp from acting as an antenna. Good luck!


Jim


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Let me get this straight, this show is hi-def and 5.1, but my local affiliate makes it crappy NTSC and mono?!
 

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The problem for me trying to use that is that my VHF reception doesn't need any amplification - in fact, almost any amplification at all causes Channel 5 to crap out !


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You CAN put antennas on your owned and/or controlled property...

http://www.fcc.gov/csb/facts/otard.html
 
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