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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I am interested in the Video to VGA (Cat Code: Video-VGA+) converter for my DLP Projector, which has a VGA input as well as RGBHV inputs as separate BNC inputs.


Info on it can be found here: http://www.allthings.com.au/Monitors...vga%20plus.htm


What I am interested in is whether or not the upconverted signal looses quality from the s-video or composite input in the conversion?


My purpose for the converter is so that I can use the converter to deinterlace the video from my DVD player and enhance my VCR through my projector.


In the description of the converter there is only mention of using this converter on computer moniters.

I was therefore wondering if it would be compatible with my projector which has a native resolution of 800x600 4:3 (832 x 480 letterbox) and accepts the following input types:


Any composite video or S-video input (BNC connectors)

VGA or up to 800 x 600 S-VGA input (15-Pin connector)

RGBHV video (5 BNC connectors)

RGB video up to 17 kHz interlaced and 38 kHz non-interlaced


The RGB video has RGBHV inputs, does this mean that a VGA to RGBHV cable would work with a VGA output?


Thank You for any help,

AEthernaut the COnfused


 

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You probably want to post this in the video processor forum.


What projector do you have? Does it take in composite or svideo input? I doubt this unit is any better than what is built into your projector.


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Alex
 

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I want to make you aware of the existence of Dscaler, excellant free deinterlacing software written by members of the AVS Forum, which requires only an inexpensive TV tuner in a PC to function. If you have a PC connected to your projector, this is a good solution for you:
http://deinterlace.sourceforge.net/


Regards,

Gary
 

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I think it is fairly safe to say that the quality of that thing will be less than perfect... perhaps not even in the ball park. If you want an external scaler with switching capabilities, be prepared to pay upwards of 2K as high as about 5K for good quality gear. perhaps a little lower for used.



I would guess that your projector will most likely do a much better job. If you have multiple inputs, there are various choices on switchers that you can use.


That box is designed for industrial use. It does not have any of the features you want/need for home theatre.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have reposted this information about my projector inputs:


Now I am a bit confused in relation to what type of video scaler would be best suited to my system.


The following are input types for my projector:


1 composite video (BNC)

S-video input (2 BNC connectors)

VGA or up to 800 x 600 S-VGA input (15-Pin connector)

RGB video (5 BNC connectors RGBHV)

RGB video up to 17 kHz interlaced and 38 kHz non-interlaced


What would therefore be the best solution to take total advantage of my projectors capabilities?


I have seen some video scalers that can output at 800x600 and produce non-interlaced image processing.


I was wondering whether RGBHV is the same as VGA 800x600 outputing but using a VGA to RGBHV cable?


If not then could anyone suggest an affordable video scaler, under $1000US (no more than 2000$ Australian)?


Thanks

AEther
 
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