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Spoke to a CSR at Voom (pretended I worked for Sears) and asked about the OTA antenna's. The installer will decide which of 2 antenna's to go with. A "stealth" antenna, presumably one that attaches to a gutter or a Yagi. According to the CSR you have to go with their antenna to incorporate local channels into the onscreen guide... why would this be? Coax is coax right? Why wouldn't an existing antenna work just the same?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by andr3wpd
According to the CSR you have to go with their antenna to incorporate local channels into the onscreen guide... why would this be? Coax is coax right? Why wouldn't an existing antenna work just the same?
Just another misinformed CSR.


The DTV tuner in a VOOM STB will need the same kind of VHF/UHF signal as any other DTV tuner.
 

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Does anyone know if the antenna will have VHF as well as UHF? Our local ABC station has decided when they come online, they are going to broadcast in VHF so I will need a new antenna anyway or combine it with my CM and somehow combine the two.
 

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A Yagi is an antenna design, made up of several elements in a row (one behind the other). An example is here . A "stealth" antenna is a more generic term, simply meaning that it generally doesn't stand out visually as much as more traditional antenna types. Many stealth antennas are omni-directional or bi-directional, while a yagi is directional. I would assume they intend on using the stealth antennas in urban areas, and the yagi in more suburban/rural areas. Directional antennas in the suburbs can generally pick up digital signals fairly easily, as all the towers are generally in the same direction. Sometimes urban settings can actually be more difficult than the more distant suburban locations. Multipath can be a problem in the city, because the relatively close proximity of the towers and other tall structures can cause reflections in the signal that really screw up digital reception. You generally solve that problem with a directional antenna, usually pointed at the tower, but then the catch-22 is that when you are in the city, the towers can be in all different directions.


I'm in such a situation... I need two antennas pointed in two different directions, because I'm in town in between all the different towers. Other solutions are rotators, or a/b switches. None of these would fall under their offered choices, which is why I wondered what they would do in such a case.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Darin
A Yagi is an antenna design, made up of several elements in a row (one behind the other). An example is here . A "stealth" antenna is a more generic term, simply meaning that it generally doesn't stand out visually as much as more traditional antenna types. Many stealth antennas are omni-directional or bi-directional, while a yagi is directional. I would assume they intend on using the stealth antennas in urban areas, and the yagi in more suburban/rural areas. Directional antennas in the suburbs can generally pick up digital signals fairly easily, as all the towers are generally in the same direction. Sometimes urban settings can actually be more difficult than the more distant suburban locations. Multipath can be a problem in the city, because the relatively close proximity of the towers and other tall structures can cause reflections in the signal that really screw up digital reception. You generally solve that problem with a directional antenna, usually pointed at the tower, but then the catch-22 is that when you are in the city, the towers can be in all different directions.


I'm in such a situation... I need two antennas pointed in two different directions, because I'm in town in between all the different towers. Other solutions are rotators, or a/b switches. None of these would fall under their offered choices, which is why I wondered what they would do in such a case.
The "stealth antanna is most likely the Channel Maser Stealth Antanna. It receives VHF FM and UHF and can be assemble with a built in preamp. I have one on my house and I can say that it completely all of my Multpath problems. I have been using the antanna for 2 years and its is very derectional.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Bruce Embry
The "stealth antanna is most likely the Channel Maser Stealth Antanna. It receives VHF FM and UHF and can be assemble with a built in preamp. I have one on my house and I can say that it completely all of my Multpath problems...
Bruce,

I'm glad the Stealth antenna solved your MP problems. However, this antenna has performed less than satisfactory on certain channel numbers for others in this forum. It all depends on location, local channel assignments, etc.


bhambrad,

What channel are they going to use? If it's highband VHF (channels 7-13), your CM UHF antenna may work fine. If it doesn't, you can just add a VHF-only antenna to your existing mast and combine it to the UHF on one downlead, using a CM VHF/UHF combiner, model 0549
 
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