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Talking back and forth with my local Fox affiliate as to why they seem like they are denying all requested waivers, Ive come to a standstill.


Here is the issue:


WTIC is the local CT Fox affiliate. In CT, if you are anywhere but Fairfield county, you receive CT-based locals (of which WTIC is one). If you are in Fairfield county, you receive NYC locals.


With the very recent semi-addition of FoxHD to DirecTV, those in Fairfield county are able to receive it via DirecTV, because NY is an O&O DMA. However, everyone else (me included) in CT cannot receive it via the dish because WTIC is "local". In this case, DecisionMark says that I can get a Grade B signal. However, the reality of the situation seems completely different. Im closer and have a better shot at receiving the NY local via OTA (granted, its not totally stable, and with bad weather would most likely be unuseable). WTIC will not grant a waiver because I can get the SD version over DirecTV as part of my CT locals.


So it comes down to being able to request a waiver just to get an HD station. Ive found WTICs antenna polar plot, and outright asked WTIC where my town would be on the plot (because I honestly dont know). Their answer was that I can receive WTIC over the dish (in my opinion, that means they know their HD antenna will NOT get to me) so I cannot get a waiver.


Is this true? Are they handling waivers incorrectly because SD is separate from HD? Or are SD and HD just not separate? I dont quite understand how I can be told "no waiver, use our signal" if the signal really wont reach me.


I really dont know, feel free to shoot down my logic, Im trying to learn about the whole waiver thing. It just seems that Im in a weird spot, both geographically and legally.


Thanks!!!

-Chris
 

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There is no waiver for digital reception. There are waivers for people who cannot receive an analog signal in a Grade B manner. No one can reject your waiver request because their signal is available via satellite. You qualify for distant networks if you cannot receive the local affiliate's analog signal at a Grade B level as received by an antenna at your location.


If you believe their analog signal does not reach your house, you can contest the waiver denial and demand a signal test. If the station finds a Grade B (which is viewable, but far from perfect) signal at your location, your waiver would be denied. If they cannot get a Grade B signal, they have to approve the waiver.


One provision of the proposed SHVIA (not yet approved) would permit DirecTV to provide "significantly viewed" stations to satellite customers, so if the NYC Fox station is available to cable customers in your area, it would then be made available via satellite as well.
 
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