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I am going to build a dedicated room in my basement. The drop ceiling will remain parallel to the floor (though about half the floor will be a riser), but I will be able to build the walls in a non-parallel fashion.


My question is, for those who know more about acoustics than I do, how far away from parallel do I need to be to minimize standing waves? For instance, if we define wall B to be parallel to wall A if it is at 0 degrees, is 2 degrees off from parallel "enough"? 5 degrees? 10?
 

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It doesn't really work like that. You will still have standing waves, it'll just be a lot more complicated than a rectangular room. You should hire an acoustical engineer to help model your room and figure out good dimensions, etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by syswei /forum/post/0


how far away from parallel do I need to be to minimize standing waves?

As Chris explained, it doesn't work that way. The main advantages of angling the side walls affect mid and high frequencies only. Specifically, 1) to avoid flutter echo (that "boing" sound) without having to treat the walls with absorption, and 2) to deflect first reflections away from the listening position without having to use absorption. However - and this is a big one - there's nothing wrong with absorption! Especially in a home theater. All rooms need absorption or diffusion to reduce the amount of room tone and coloration added by the room.


I'm not saying you shouldn't angle your walls, and if that makes your room larger this is a Good Thing. But often angling the walls makes the room smaller, and that's usually best avoided in home-sized listening rooms and theaters.


--Ethan
 

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I believe 5 degrees is the minimum for useful results. You aren't minimizing standing waves, instead of having 1 dimension that resonates at a few frequencies, you have a range of dimensions so the standing waves occur over a range of frequencies. But you still need trapping as Ethan said.
 
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