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I have home videos that go back 20 years - to the days you had to lug around a 14 lb. deck hooked into a 5-6 lb. camera that wouldn't work well in other than bright light.


I want to transfer these (copy) to DVD. I don't need to edit. The early tapes are on VHS, later ones on 8mm. I can use an old 8mm camera to play back those tapes into the DVD recorder. Same with new mini-DV tapes.


I am not a high level techie. I want to set up a simple method of copying all these tapes to DVD. What would you folks suggest? Am I correct in assuming a stand alone recorder would be easier than using a computer?


Thanks.


...mike
 

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We are using the Pioneer 7000 DVD recorder with great success.


We use the 1 hour mode where ever possible as it provides the highest picture quality. The 2 hour mode is also very good, but some artifacts are a little easier to see. The 4 hour mode is not worth the media savings.


The other thing to keep in mind is what media you use.


We use maxell DVD-R for mastering and Verbatim ink jet printable DVD-r media for copies of the masters. Maxell also sells ink jet printable, which might be a slightly more compatible disc on older DVD players.


Are there less costly media alternatives, yes but we have found there are significant trade offs that in the end are not worth the savings.


Good luck with you transfers.


RJ

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I'm also using the Pioneer DVR-7000 with Verbatim DataLifePlus DVD-Rs, which were on sale last week at Best Buy for $2. It is very easy and the DVD-Rs are playing on my four DVD players and all of my children's DVD players, except a Toshiba-3109, that is about 3 years old, I think. Tom
 

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The Pioneer recorders are good decks, but I have to put in a plug for the Panasonic DMR series DVD-RAM/R recorders as well. They are well regarded on this forum and the DMR-HS2 has a DV input and auto DV record feature that facilitates transfer from digital comcorders in addition to traditional analog inputs. The HS2 even has a built in 40GB hard drive that allows you to record to the hard drive and then burn multiple DVD-R disks from the source file residing on the hard drive. They are very user friendly and reliable. In addition, their price is very reasonable starting at about $500 US fOR the non-hard-drive unit. For the description of what you want to do, a standalone deck appears to be your best choice.


Vic
 

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My home movies go back 50 years (counting my parent's), all have been previously transferred to VHS tapes. I'm preserving these tapes for my children and granchildren. I just start the VHS player and the Pioneer DVR-7000 makes a digital copy in DVD-R format I've already made over 30 (SP) DVD-Rs from 2-hour VHS tapes. All of the DVD-Rs are recorded directly from the VHS tapes. I'm sure recording to a hard drive would speed things up for making additional copies and editing possible, but I was just interested in archiving old VHS tapes to DVD. I imagine the hard drive interface would add some complexity to the process. :) Tom
 

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The advantage of the internal hard drive comes into play if there is any editing to be done. For no editing, I would agree that Pioneer seems like the best solution.


But, I have the HS2 and definately like the unit a lot. It is great for TV recording purposes and timeshifting. You may want to consider if this sort of thing would be an interest to you after the VHS tapes are all copied to DVD. If so, you might want to make the investment right away. The unit will run about $800 from an online shop. The HS2 has the DVD-RAM rewriteable format, which would come into play after for general recording purposes at a later date also.
 
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