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Discussion Starter #1
Warner Bros. is to release its films in 4K. It is

Warner Bros. policy everything will be released in

4K, says Spencer Stephens, vice president and

general manager of Motion Picture Imaging at

Warner Bros.

The Warner Bros. 4K facility is already making life

easier for film-makers as they move to the higher

quality 4K d-cinema standard. 4K images contain

four times the information of 2K.

Feature films, says Stephens, are being

distributed through the Digital Cinema Initiatives

(DCI) standard, which allows the picture to be played

on both 4K and 2K projectors. A cinema can take the

same version of a film, whether it has 4K or 2K

projectors. Either way, research shows that

audiences prefer watching a movie on a digital

projector than a 35mm film projector, allowing a title

to make more money when shown digitally.

But, says Stephens, audiences would rather watch

in 4K. People prefer to watch in 4K than 2K.

Stephens says the human eye can start seeing the

pixels in a 2K picture when they are sitting at a

distance from the screen that is less than three

times the height of the screen. You can get a lot

closer to a 4K picture without the picture being

compromised, which makes the 4K experience more

enjoyable. Over here (in the US), all new theatres

have stadium seating, where the audience is closer

to the screen and the screen is a lot bigger,

Stephens explains.

British-born Stephens heads up the Warner Bros.

4K production facility in Los Angeles, which has

pioneered the 4K pipeline for

making movies. The facility is run as a

commercial operation and attracts work

from other top studios in Hollywood as well

as Warner Bros. It also remasters classics

for the Blu-ray market. For instance, it

recently restored The Godfather Parts I, II

and III for Paramount. It now looks

absolutely phenomenal, says Stephens.

4K is the future, there are absolutely so

many reasons for it. One of them is that

there is not much difference between 2K

and HD and most people who want to go to

the cinema, want to have a better user

experience than at home.

The work we do is 4K end-to-end, he

adds. Whether it starts out as film or a

digital 4K camera, we scan at 4K and have a

complete 4K digital pipeline. Some people

have a pipeline where they scan at 2K, but if

you up-res from 2K to 4K, 75 per cent of the

pixels have been guessed at by the

computer. At 4K, you can keep all the

original resolution.

The industry, he says, is starting to accept

the logic of 4K. I think some film-makers

are getting it. It depends to some extent

what camera you shoot with, how it is set up

and what the DoP thinks of it.

It does not have to cost more to create a

4K movie, he says. It is a myth about the

cost of 4K. We built a 4K pipeline three years

ago from the ground up so, from our point

of view, it is the same cost as 2K.

The only thing is how long you have to

stay on the scanner. It takes maybe three

times longer to scan a film to 4K. But, so

what? You can leave it running. Otherwise,

there are no other cost differences.


- 4k Cine Alta Newsletter (Summer 2008)
 

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Fantastic! I almost forgive them for doing a hit on HD-DVD. Almost.
 

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Hopefully they'll remove the film grain too and let us see the movie itself!
 

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Discussion Starter #5

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alimentall /forum/post/14318634


Hopefully they'll remove the film grain too and let us see the movie itself!

Well, if it's shot on 4k Digital (no film involved) then it shouldn't have any grain, unless the DoP decided that it should.
 

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True, though I assume there will be a whole lot of remastering being done and I'm also not so sure how many good 4K cameras are out there. Maybe more than I realize. I hope so. But they seem to be talking more about scanning the films rather than filming it, at least at the moment. Even the dumbed down version of the 4K remaster of Wizard of Oz was unbelievably cool, even on my crappy 32" LCD. I just don't need film grain reminding me constantly that it's a film. It really kills my suspension of disbelief.
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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Maybe not in the short run, but a 4K image scaled down to 1080p would be on an entirely other level from a film transfer. Nothing worse than watching a high-def movie and being pissed off by the quality from the mediocre to bad transfer. Transformers looks like crap on HD-DVD and it shouldn't. HD-based Planet Earth is variable, but generally looks stunning, even with relatively early generation HD cameras. I assume that most, if not all of that is HD based, anyway, from the general lack of grain.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DefinerOfReality /forum/post/14318973


There currently are only two 4k digital cameras in use:


The Red One

http://www.red.com/


&


The Dalsa

http://www.dalsa.com/dc/4K_products/origin_main.asp



These are capable of capturing more information than most 35 mm film negatives, and without losing quality as the camera information makes it's way down the 4k digital production pipeline!


The olympus has been around for a while as well.
http://octavision.olympus-global.com/en/2006.cfm


There was a showing (Sony SRX) of parts of this recording and some other 4K (Octavision?) material in town last September, but didn't attend.
http://www.cinegrid.org/news/2007_07_03_holland2007.php
http://www.picnicnetwork.org/page/10572/en .
 

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Discussion Starter #11

Quote:
Originally Posted by GetGray /forum/post/14320004


In the short run at least, it won't do anyhing for the HT. Will it?

I use a Sony 4k projector in my home theater. And the way technology marches forward, we'll probably see 4k at home for some in the next several years, but not as a regular occurrence for more than a another decade!


That's why the film studios want to produce an experience you can only get "out at the movies", including 3D.
 

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very nice development



this can give ti the push they need to come

with the first 4k dlp.


hope sony will have there 4k consumer at cedia because this will helps

a little bit as well.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DefinerOfReality /forum/post/14318973


There currently are only two 4k digital cameras in use:


The Red One

http://www.red.com/


&


The Dalsa

http://www.dalsa.com/dc/4K_products/origin_main.asp



These are capable of capturing more information than most 35 mm film negatives, and without losing quality as the camera information makes it's way down the 4k digital production pipeline!

The Bayer chip that both these cameras use is not a true full 4K imager. Yes it has 4K worth of pixles but the are in a scrambled RGB pattern. You don't get 4K worth of discrete RGB.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yes! But it does offer up a very sharp, clean image given good lighting (250 ASA) - worthy of using fine lenses with. And it is only a matter of time before we see the full 4k and beyond in a digital motion picture camera - just as has come to pass with digital still cameras.
 
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