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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
MEDIA ADVISORY

ILS Proton to Launch DIRECTV-5

April 30, 2002


Payload: DIRECTV-5

Loral 1300 platform

Separated mass: approx. 3,640 kg (8,025 lbs)


Launch Vehicle: Proton K/Block DM

http://www.ilslaunch.com/pictures/pr...094-proton.jpg


Weight at liftoff: 691,272 kg (1.5 million lbs), including payload


Height: 57.2 m (187.7 ft)


Payload fairing: 4.35 m (14.27 ft) diameter


Launch Date: Monday, May 6, 2002


Launch Window Opens: 11 p.m. Baikonur

9:00 p.m. Moscow

17:00 GMT

1:00 p.m. EDT (USA)


Launch Site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

Launch Complex 81, Pad 24


End User: DIRECTV, Inc., leading U.S. direct-to-home entertainment provider


Satellite Manufacturer: Space Systems/Loral, Palo Alto, Calif.


Launch Vehicle Manufacturer: Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, Moscow - Proton first three stages; RSC Energia, near Moscow - Block DM fourth stage


Launch Services Provider: International Launch Services (ILS), McLean, Va.


Satellite Use: Direct-to-home entertainment and broadband services


Satellite Statistics:


7th satellite launched in DIRECTV/DBS constellation


Orbital location: 119 degrees West longitude


32 transponders, 113 watts at Ku-band

(switchable to 16 transponders with 220 watts)


Anticipated service life of 12 years


Mission Profile: The Proton launch vehicle will inject the DIRECTV-5 satellite into geosynchronous transfer orbit. The first three stages will use a standard ascent trajectory to place the Block DM upper stage with the satellite into a an elliptical parking orbit of 186.5 km by 222.2 km (116 mi x 138 mi), inclined at 51.6 degrees. Then the Block DM will ignite twice to propel the satellite to its target transfer orbit of 35,786 km x 6,600 km (22,236 mi x 4,101 mi), inclined at 17.6 degrees. Following separation from the Block DM, the spacecraft will perform a series of liquid apogee engine burns to raise perigee, lower inclination and circularize the orbit at the geostationary altitude of 36,000 km (22,300 mi).


Spacecraft Separation: Approximately 6 hours, 32 minutes after liftoff


ILS Mission Statistics:


4th ILS mission this year


2nd ILS Proton mission this year


23rd ILS mission on Proton since formation of the U.S.-Russian joint venture in 1995


View a pdf of the Mission Overview



Live Broadcast: Telstar 6, transponder 22, C-band

Downlink frequency 4140 MHz horizontal

Signals to begin at 12:15 p.m. EDT


More Information: Live webcast and general mission information will be available on the ILS web site. Launch status updates are available on the ILS U.S. domestic Launch Hotline at 1-800-852-4980.


# # #


CONTACT: Fran Slimmer, ILS, McLean, Va.;1-571-633-7462, international cell: +1-646-229-4801; [email protected]

ILS #02-9
 

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Yeah - that was a nice descriptive press release for

us techies who like all the little details.


What does the satellite itself actually weigh?

roughly 2000lbs or so?

I was surprised that the launch vehicle weighs

some 1.5 millions pounds. Thats a lot of fuel

and vehicle to get one satllite up there!


The press release doesn't suggest that the rocket

will be carrying up other satellites.


I wonder how much (if any) of the proton rocket

comes back down and can be reused?


Thats a lot of "stuff" to use up just so we can watch

more TV!
 

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urlybird-


What a great post! I't the kind of thing I love about this forum in that once in a great while someone puts up something worthwhile and factual.


Thanks!
 

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There are two people standing by the first strap on booster to the right, which gives you a good feeling for the scale. Quite an impressive candle :)


What I don't get though is the liftoff weight. Its 1.5 million pounds. The Saturn 5 (way larger than this one) only had 1.5 million pounds of thrust in its first stage. What kind of thrust does this thing have? Do you need one pound of thrust to get one pound of weight off the ground, or is there no relation in those measures?
 

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Apologies for being slightly off topic, but I have a strong feeling that those following this thread would really enjoy:

http://www.imax.com/spacestation/


I saw this yesterday and my jaw still won't close ;)

Inspiring, breathtaking, and there are seat-shaking close-ups of two launches, one possibly from Kazakhstan (I don't recall precisely). I wish my home theater were like this...
 

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Is that the actual launch vehicle, or just one of the same type?


If it's the same one, it's interesting that it's being launched from Kazakhstan but still has an American flag displayed on the side.
 

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The paying passenger gets their logos on the ship. That seems to be pretty standard fare in the launch business as far as I've seen so far. I think that one of the launches of the recent space passengers was sponsdered by someone like Pizza Hut or something like that, so they had their logo on the rocket.


The Russian space program needs to carry its own weight as much as possible these days, and sat launches are a good business for them. They've been doing disposables all this time while we payed for the very expensive manned shuttle launches, and they've gotten very good at it.
 

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Of course "good" is a relative term :) Every country doing launches has their share of "non-optimal events", because its still a matter of releasing a whole lot of energy in a short period of time, so its always going to be kind of dangerous and iffy. People whose job doesn't depend on the numbers being otherwise tend to give the shuttle realistic odds of 1 in 500 or so for a serious event on any one launch. France had a really embarrasing one where one of their first Arianne (sp?) 5 launches, with like a billion dollar satelitte on board or something like that, had to be remote destructed by the range officer because someone accidentally loaded the Arianne 4 software into the onboard computer, causing it to decide to take the very scenic route to orbit. These things have hundreds of thousands of parts and any of them can cause a catastrophic event given the right circumstances.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by tji
Is that the actual launch vehicle, or just one of the same type?


If it's the same one, it's interesting that it's being launched from Kazakhstan but still has an American flag displayed on the side.
The Russians are under contract for the launch by ILS (International Launch Services), McLean, Virginia.


I guess if you pay 'em enough they'll paint any damn flag you want on there! Ain't Capitalism great?;)
 

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I think NASA-TV is on DirecTV channel 376, if we're talking about NASA-TV...but I don't think NASA has anything to do with this launch.
 

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Well, yesterday the programming started 30 minutes before launch, but the channel was in the program guide all day.


Today, the channel isn't in the program guide. Hopefully it will come on before launch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
PVR


- I think you missed the payload info in the news release:

Payload:

DIRECTV-5

Loral 1300 platform

Separated mass: approx. 3,640 kg (8,025 lbs)

Launch Vechicle

Proton K/Block DM

Weight at liftoff: 691,272 kg (1.5 million lbs), including payload


- they don’t indicate what gets left behind
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Proton K/Block DM Launch Sequence


In a typical Proton launch:


a) the vehicle’s six first-stage engines ignite 1.6 seconds before liftoff.


b) stage two ignition occurs approximately two minutes into flight, four seconds prior to jettison of the first stage.


c) stage three vernier engine ignition occurs at 330 seconds, with separation of the second and third stages taking place 3.5 seconds later. The stage three main engine ignition occurs 2.5 seconds after separation. The payload fairing is jettisoned late in the ascent, at 351 seconds. The stage three shut-down occurs at approximately 570 seconds, with stage three and four separation occurring approximately 15 seconds later.


For typical Proton missions:


a) first three stages inject the elements above the third stage into a 200-kilometer (108-nautical mile) circular orbit.


b) Block DM fourth stage then performs all mission unique maneuvers, starting from the parking orbit. The first burn of the Block DM engine occurs approximately 55 minutes after lift-off as the vehicle crosses the first ascending node, and lasts six and one half minutes.


c) second Block DM burn, which places the spacecraft into its final orbit, occurs approximately 5.5 hours later at geosynchronous altitude, and lasts two and one half minutes.
 
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