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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I recently bought a Tosh 65HDX82. While watching DVD movies, I see the top and bottom horizontal bars.


I am worried that watching DVDs with the top/bottom bars will cause a "burn-out" problem.


I used the "Film" setting and tried all the different pic size options. The DVD is set to 16:9 aspect ratio.


Please help.


Thanks.
 

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Well, I am new here, and am just starting to research HD purchace. I was looking at this set at a local AV store ( what I could consider reputable, sells primarily high-end stuff). I asked this question about the set, and the owner, who was helping us, said that there is really no burn-in effect. I was supprised by this, but now I am looking forward to what others have to say. How do you like this set, by the way?


Cheers,

Mark
 

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Black bars are normal on a 2.35:1 widescreen movie. Setting contrast and brightness at levels that are correct (as per calibration disks like avia, Video Essentials or the thx tool on Star Wars2, Monsters Inc etc.) will minimize burn in risk. Normal viewing using the stretch modes for 4:3 material helps as well. Burn in is really a risk when contrast is jacked up (above 50% gets into the risk area on some sets) to compete with a sunny room and black bars, news scrolls, game counters or colored station bugs are left on for days at a time. Even the grey bars can be a risk if used exclusively with many constant hours of 4:3 material.


Cheers,

Paul
 

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There certainly is a chance of BURN IN on RPTV sets, even the new ones. However that said it is much harder to do it now days thanks to advancements in technology and forums like this one.


Others have mentioned that keeping your brightness and contrast down is important (which it is) and all I'll add to the mix is that if you are going to watch several anamorphic movies with the bars on the bottom and top back to back then you may want to give the set a break by displaying something full screen for a short bit.


This generally isn't a problem in most cases, unless you are running a LOTR marathon later this year I wouldn't worry about it too much as long as you take the advice on these forums and get your set configured using an AVIA or similar disc and you should be off and running.
 

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Quote:
I was looking at this set at a local AV store ( what I could consider reputable, sells primarily high-end stuff). I asked this question about the set, and the owner, who was helping us, said that there is really no burn-in effect.
I am shocked that a person who wants to sell a Television would tell you not to worry about one of the cheif concerns you have with the set:)


Seriously, this has been discussed numerous times and the general consensus is(as has already been posted above):


1. Screen Burn-In does exist.

2. Using the Torch Modes(Factory Settings), you will learn number 1 rather quickly.

3. Proper Calibration eliminates the Torch Modes.

4. Screen Burn-in is very hard to accomplish on a set that is properly calibrated and displays a range of aspect ratios.


This is not to say that it can not happen, but I have never heard of a single person who had their set properly calibrated and who watched a range of aspect ratios complain of screen burn-in. There are some here who refuse to stretch a 4:3 image(thus creating geometric distortion). It seems that on properly calibrated sets with varying aspect ratio sources, they have not experienced burn-in.
 

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I've read that burn in from letterboxing is far less likely than pillar boxing, because of the horizontal orientation of scan lines. Is this so?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by ScottAvery
I've read that burn in from letterboxing is far less likely than pillar boxing, because of the horizontal orientation of scan lines. Is this so?
Scott- I have never heard this but I seriously doubt it. The problem is that anytime you have a black are on the screen, no wear occurs their; the areas that are not black have some degree of phosphor wear. The difference in the wear between the areas is what we perceive to be burn-in. Thus it shouldn't matter whether the letterboxing is vertical or horizontal; the wear will occur unevenly.
 
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