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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am sorry Iam new to alot of this stuff, but I have a question


Do "watts" on your A/V reciever tell you how loud your system can get? (60 vs 100 watts, for instance


I am not trying to blow my house down but I bought a industrial plasma and I am running all the sound through my reciever, at it doesnt seem to have a lot sound quality at a slightly higher volume


thanks in advance
 

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Can you get sufficient volume using a CD player or other source such as FM?
 

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Several factor determine how loud your system will play. For instance:


speaker sensitivity

Amplifier power

Seating distance

Number of speakers

Placement


If you really want to know how loud your system will play try this link http://www.myhometheater.homestead.c...alculator.html


Also remember that most receivers have power ratings that are exaggerated while most stand alone amps from companies like Rotel and Parasound to name a couple are conservative with their power ratings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hmm...good question. I am not at home at the moment, but if the answer to that one is yes, any ideas?


Thanks
 

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I'm a relative newbie, so take it FWIW, but it was explained to me as follows: If two receivers with different wattage are calibrated to play at the same SPL reading (say 75db) at the same volume setting (e.g. -15db on the receiver), they'll play a test tone equally loud with the volume knob at the same level. But, assuming everything else is the same with the receivers, the higher power receiver will possibly handle large sudden changes in volume better (e.g. an explosion during a movie). Thus, it won't necessarily play louder, it'll just handle louder volumes better. Any experts, please correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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The more watts that your receiver has available the higher the head room. In other words, when a movie has a huge explosion and your running a 100wpc receiver or smaller then there is a really good possibility that the receiver will run out of power.


With. lets say, a 220 wpc receiver or amp then you will have more than enough head room for the loudest of peaks. And with more head room comes less distortion during those times when you need more power.


Now, alot depends on your speakers and how your receiver is REALLY rated. Some receivers don't come close to their rated power, while others will be under rated. And as for the speakers, it depends on their sensitivity, in dbs. The higher the db rating the less power it takes to drive them.


Also, do you have a room eq system? Such as many of the newer receivers have, like the HK AVR 635. The eq works mainly at the sub woofer frequencies. That in its self will do wonders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the responses. I forgot to post my second question...I have 3 speakers hooked up-left, center, right. I am only getting sound from the left and right, at least when I watch my digital cable. Should I have something set differently? (DSP, "Loudness", Dolby, etc)


I know it must be something simple but I cant figure it out


thanks again
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tie3374
Thanks for the responses. I forgot to post my second question...I have 3 speakers hooked up-left, center, right. I am only getting sound from the left and right, at least when I watch my digital cable. Should I have something set differently? (DSP, "Loudness", Dolby, etc)


I know it must be something simple but I cant figure it out


thanks again
First, go into the receiver's setup menu and make sure that you have the "center speaker" setting turned on. And if your receiver has an "auto" setting, then use it, then when it receives a 5.1 soundtrack it will automatically come in 5 channel.


If that doesn't fix it then we go from there.
 

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You need a better receiver if you want more volume. Try a Pioneer VSX-1015TX-K. There are many other choices. Inexpensive receivers generally do not make rated power. The 1015 does make rated power.


Bill
 

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Current drives speakers, not watts. Just look at tubes, HK receivers that have low wattage, yet tons of current. Don't get hung up on watts alone.
 

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Couple of things.


1. TV sound on only two channels (meaning none from center channel).

You may have to set the surround type to provide a center channel output, it sounds like the default is going to stereo rather than a surround mode. Don't know the exact setting, but I think you'll find one if you try some of the different surround modes.


2. Watts = volume = true. However, as others have said there are many factors. The thing to remember is going from 60 to 100 watts will provide some volume increase, but NOT nearly twice as loud as the difference in watts would imply. All things being equal, you would need ten times the power (600 watts/channel) to make your setup twice as loud.


3. Don't get caught up in the "high current" amp/receiver thing. While certain brands such as H/K promote high current, the fact is that the amp will only deliver current as required by the speaker impedance. If the impedance of the speaker never presents a load to need 50 amps of peak current, the receiver/amp will never deliver it. It matters not if your amp could provide 10,000 amps of peak current (exaggeration to make the point) if the load of your speakers only ever required 5 amps of current - the amp would deliver only 5 amps.


As mentioned, some brand exaggerate the output more than others, but there is plenty of reading on this subject to be found in searching this forum and the internet...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by whoaru99
Couple of things.




3. Don't get caught up in the "high current" amp/receiver thing. While certain brands such as H/K promote high current, the fact is that the amp will only deliver current as required by the speaker impedance. If the impedance of the speaker never presents a load to need 50 amps of peak current, the receiver/amp will never deliver it. It matters not if your amp could provide 10,000 amps of peak current (exaggeration to make the point) if the load of your speakers only ever required 5 amps of current - the amp would deliver only 5 amps.


As mentioned, some brand exaggerate the output more than others, but there is plenty of reading on this subject to be found in searching this forum and the internet...


The problem is you do not know how much current your speakers will demand from an amplifier. If the speakers require more current than your receiver can deliver, that is where the problems start.



Some speakers rated for 8 ohms NOMINAL are 3 ohm's in the bass region, so CURRENT is the issue in a lot of cases rather than POWER. Receiver POWER is not always specified at the 3 ohm impedance point, so an 8 ohm rated amplifier may or may not work with a specific speaker due to amplifier's CURRENT limitations.



Then again, some people way "over power" their systems just to be "safe"!!!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tie3374
I have the Pioneer VSX-D309 (60 watts per channel)
Only having 60 watts is the problem. So I would strongly suggest that you get a receiver that has an eq setup, besides more power, like the HK AVR 635. I paid $799 via the net, the first month it was available. I can be found on the net even cheaper now. The list price was either $1199 or $1299.


The 635 is only rated @ 90w, but HK under rates their receivers.

And once you get a receiver with an EQ setup you can always add an amp to it later, if you want more power , as I did a few years back.
 

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tie,


There is room for improvement in the receiver, but without knowing what your speakers are it's hard to say much more than what has been said.


As a general rule, good speakers will still sound good even with relatively cheap electronics; however, even the best receiver will sound only as good as the speakers you use. So, the point is if you have not so good speakers, you probably are not going to benefit as much from a big receiver upgrade.


I don't see mentioned what speakers you are using. It might go a long way to better advice.
 
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