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Discussion Starter #1
Probably a stupid question...


Visual Apex is throwing one in for free with a Panny Plasma purchase but have no idea whether it is valuable and what it is for
 

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The commercial versions of some plasmas use removable blades for their inputs. If you get a component video input blade, the connectors are probably BNC. The BNC-RCA adapters let you use your standard component cables with RCA plugs on the TV.
 

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A bnc jack is just a different type of jack than rca, it has little pegs that get latched onto, to make the connection more secure (cord can't be yanked out). Which is great, unless you have a cable that has rca plugs, and are trying to connect it to a bnc jack. So, the rca/bnc adapter was born. Now you plug your rca cable into the adapter, and can use it in a bnc jack. You lose the benefit of the tighter connection, but at least you can watch your damn movie!
 

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The BNC connection is superior to traditional RCA jacks. I assume that the panel you bought has this connection. This way you wont lose one of your component connections. You may have to let the panel know through the menu that you are only using the R-B-G portion of the BNC which normally has 5 connections.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake04Goat
The commercial versions of some plasmas use removable blades for their inputs. If you get a component video input blade, the connectors are probably BNC. The BNC-RCA adapters let you use your standard component cables with RCA plugs on the TV.
Another stupid question: planning to use HDMI to connect to TV. Do I still need the BNC-RCA adapter?

Planning to go from cable box to TV with HDMI and then using S video from TV to receiver. Does that make sense?
 

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Typical of the excellent "Extra Mile" service from the great people at Visual Apex is that they included the adapters in the shipping box. This saves you a trip to the local Rat Shack where you would be charged a ridiculous amount of money for them. I believe the BNC connectors are used as a locking device for the commercial units which may well be used in areas where they may be jostled or moved regularly. This would possibly allow the RCA plugs to come loose.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by anandrag
Probably a stupid question...


Visual Apex is throwing one in for free with a Panny Plasma purchase but have no idea whether it is valuable and what it is for
http://www.glaucobruzzi.com/Attachme...nalBoard_3.jpg


1 .Free Slot.

1 .S-Video & Composite inputs .... (BNC Connectors)

1 .Component / RGB input .......... (BNC Connectors)

1. Component / VGA input .......... (HD15 Connector)




The Component Connections on the Commercial Pannys have a "BNC" connector on the Blades. These adapters allow the use of a regular (RCA) Component cable to be used with the "BNC" Connection on the Blade.


No changes have to be made in the Menu !
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by anandrag
Another stupid question: planning to use HDMI to connect to TV. Do I still need the BNC-RCA adapter?

Planning to go from cable box to TV with HDMI and then using S video from TV to receiver. Does that make sense?
they got BNC-RCA, BNC-Component, BNC-Coaxial(IIRC) etc... but there is no need for BNC plugs for HDMI, DVI, and VGA.


The purpose of BNC plugs(or adapters) are to "secure" the cables. HDMI, VGA, and DVI cables already come with the screwing tips that is why you don't need BNC. Most commercial TVs require BNC plugs, without having those, they will physically not fit........



Security is a good thang



i'd also avoid using S-video..... the quality sucks.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by anandrag
Another stupid question: planning to use HDMI to connect to TV. Do I still need the BNC-RCA adapter?

Planning to go from cable box to TV with HDMI and then using S video from TV to receiver. Does that make sense?
Not really -- S-video cannot carry an HD signal. You need component, DVI, or HDMI for that.
 

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As to why we have BNC connectors, they are military/instrumentation grade connectors. Unlike your typical RCA plug, they are made to tight impedance tolerances to avoid reflections at the connector and the screw-on connection makes sure it is not susceptible to vibration or signal leakage.


The first time I touched a BNC connector was on an oscilloscope probe.


And, if you are up for trivia, BNC stands for Barrel Nut Connector. Well actually it looks as though I have learned a myth, Amphenol says "BNC stands for Bayonet Neill Concelman and is named after Amphenol engineer Carl Concelman."
 

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I was taught in a Cisco class that BNC stood for British Naval Connector. Since this was used for 10base2 10Mbps etihernet connections.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IamAnoobieCheez
they got BNC-RCA, BNC-Component, BNC-Coaxial(IIRC) etc... but there is no need for BNC plugs for HDMI, DVI, and VGA.
"Component" is not a connector type and therefore there is no such thing as "BNC-Component" adapters.
 

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Just a note of interest: BNC connectors allow passthrough of a "true" 75 Ohm signal, which is the video standard you ideally want going to your display. RCA connectors were not originally made for video, and due to the design, internal reflections etc, RCA connectors can not maintain the 75 Ohm signal to the display. Close, but not quite.


In practice the visible difference on the average consumer display is negligible, between using a cable with BNC connectors to BNC input, vs decent RCA connectors to RCA input. I haven't been able to see any difference when I've compared the two. But theoretically if you are using an analog component connection the impedance difference could become visible under some circumstances (and perhaps on the biggest screens). (I only recall one person with a projection screen doing a side-by-side of RCA/BNC connections and reporting in favor of the BNC).


But, if you are using BNC adaptors on RCA connectors that's all moot, of course, since the RCA adaptors are placing the limit on the signal.


Since I have the commercial panny, which has BNC connections, I had some cables made with BNC connections on one end (into the plasma) and RCA connectors on the other (into my source devices - DVD player etc). The main benefit being the sturdier connection of the BNC connector, given I move my plasma around on an articulated arm/wall mount.
 

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perhaps they threw in the silly adapters because your panel probably has available a composite input using a BNC termination. most composite video today is ran over inexpensive RCA type cable. maybe for connecting your VCR to your panel..., etc. since composite video is low quality to begin with the impedance mismatch of a RCA cable does not make much of a difference. when you get to better quality video (component) the impedance matching becomes more important, and the BNC connector helps to maintain proper "Z" end-to-end.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CycloneGT
I was taught in a Cisco class that BNC stood for British Naval Connector. Since this was used for 10base2 10Mbps etihernet connections.
Duly noted in the Wikipedia entry for BNC, but incorrect. And they say we Americans tend to claim credit for things we don't deserve... :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BNC_connector
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness
Since I have the commercial panny, which has BNC connections, I had some cables made with BNC connections on one end (into the plasma) and RCA connectors on the other (into my source devices - DVD player etc). The main benefit being the sturdier connection of the BNC connector, given I move my plasma around on an articulated arm/wall mount.
So if I plan to use HDMI from DVD to TV, won't need the BNC connector? Guess I will still need it from my HD cable box to TV?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by anandrag
So if I plan to use HDMI from DVD to TV, won't need the BNC connector?
That's right. The HDMI is a digital signal that uses a digital HDMI cable/connectors. BNC connectors are only for analog signals that pass along component or composite cables.

Quote:
Guess I will still need it from my HD cable box to TV?
Only if you are using an analog connection out from your HD box. If you will be taking an analog (non-HDMI) connection from your cable box it will be a component connection (3 wire, because for analog connections HD can only pass along component connections). If that's the case you'll need the BNC connectors on the end going into the plasma.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness
Only if you are using an analog connection out from your HD box. If you will be taking an analog (non-HDMI) connection from your cable box it will be a component connection (3 wire, because for analog connections HD can only pass along component connections). If that's the case you'll need the BNC connectors on the end going into the plasma.
Are the typical connections from HD box analog or digital? If analog then I am to use component. If digital, then optical? How does amp fit in to all of this? How do I wire that in between DVD player, TV and HD box?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by anandrag
Are the typical connections from HD box analog or digital? If analog then I am to use component. If digital, then optical? How does amp fit in to all of this? How do I wire that in between DVD player, TV and HD box?
"typically":

digi video will either be DVI or HDMI (it's the same signal on 2 different types of terminations)


digi audio will be either on toslink, coax, or hdmi


analog video will be on RCA composite or BNC component


analog audio will be on a mono or stereo RCA cable


typical HD boxes have a variety of these outputs.


a AV unit is the homebase for controlling/switching/playing signals. with my denon avr3806 my cable box goes there via hdmi, my dvd goes there via hdmi, my cd player goes there via toslink, and my vcr goes there via composite video and stereo rca audio.


my panny panel connects to the avr via a single hdmi cable.


the avr controls whats playing on the tv as well as processing audio.
 
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