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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard that DVI is coming in the near future but know nothing about it other than the letters mean "Digital Video Interface".


1) How will this connection improve my TV's (40XBR) PQ?


2) Is the connection only for HDTV, or will it affect all digital video?


3) What are all the implied advantages and disadvantages (if any) of this DVI connection? Pros and cons.


I welcome any and all AV Forum members to respond. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Kipp, I thought a good informative discussion of what DVI will do for our tube TV's would be an excellent topic in this particular forum. Sure beats bickering over the shape of our screens! heh, heh.
 

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cajieboy


The DVI is called digital visual interface in my Sony 34xbr800 owner's manual but maybe some call it digital video interface too. The DVI is an all digital connection while component ports are analog. The theoretical advantage is that there will be less digital to analog conversion if you use DVI to transmit an image compared to component. The less D/A conversions means less noise if all else is equal. The DVI connection is currently used for DVD and HDTV STB but it seems like it might be useful for inputs like direct HD DVR too when they become available. While the advantage of DVI may be a better picture (the folks on the DVD hardware section love the Bravo D1 DVD player connected by DVI) the disadvantage is the new technology requiring new adaptations (like new cables) and the concerns of those who don't have DVI and the control issues of HDCP. That's a pretty compact assessment but I hope it answers some of your questions. For more on the different types of DVI, here is a link to a DVI tutorial:

http://www.pacificcable.com/DVI_Tutorial.htm


Rick
 

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Will a DVI input be necessary to view HD broadcasts in the future? I mean, will I still be able to use my current HDTV with my current HD tuner in the years to come? I have heard that DVI input may be necessary for HD-DVD but I'm don't see why it would be for HD broadcasts. And if HD-DVD does in fact use a DVI input, is it possible that I could buy a converter that would allow the use of HD-DVD through component cables?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by david118383
Will a DVI input be necessary to view HD broadcasts in the future? I mean, will I still be able to use my current HDTV with my current HD tuner in the years to come? I have heard that DVI input may be necessary for HD-DVD but I'm don't see why it would be for HD broadcasts. And if HD-DVD does in fact use a DVI input, is it possible that I could buy a converter that would allow the use of HD-DVD through component cables?
No. Selectable output control is dead.:)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by kippjones
No. Selectable output control is dead.:)
It's not dead untill someone kills it legislatively/regulatorily ... which hopefully will happen soon.


Also, downrezzing isn't dead yet (unfortunately).
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by david118383
What is selectable control?
Selectable Output Control = The ability to selectively enable/disable outputs on a source for particular content. Basically ... the ability to turn off outputs on a device.


For example ... a cable box may have lots of connections (DVI, Firewire, Component, Composite, S-Video, etc.). However, for certain content, they may turn off certain connections ...


The electronics companies hate the idea ... as they are the ones that are going to have to deal with people if a certain output is disabled. Also, makes planning new equipment rather tricky (what's going to be turned off?).


Content owners (MPAA, movie studios) like the idea because it gives them maximum control over their content (Don't want something to be recorded at all ... make it DVI only).


Content providers (cable companies, satelite companies) are caught in the middle. They like the idea of getting content they might not otherwise have (movies before they come out on DVD for example). Most importantly, cable doesn't want satelite to have ouput control if they don't (and vice-versa).


The recent electronics/cable agreement suggests the FCC dissalow selectable output control for all devices.
 

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dt_dc


Thanks for another great explanation, this time on "selectable output control" (SOC). So, the SOC if allowed, might allow the content provider to send a HD show like a first-run movie and then embedded within the show signal is a SOC signal that shuts off the component port in the STB so that the show may only be watchable in HD over DVI but may be still be watchable over S video or composite in non-HD? Is that close? Can you provide a better example so I can understand this better? Thanks.


Rick
 

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There's SOC ... and then there's Downrezzing.


SOC = Some content is shown (or even bought), and SOC shuts down certain outputs. Specific examples are hard to come up with ... because it's decided at the time of the broadcast/recording. Perhaps they shut down component only ... perhaps they shut down all analog outputs (component, composite, S-Video). Perhaps they allow only DVI ... perhaps they allow only Firewire. Perhaps they do it only for certain premium content ... perhaps they use it a bit more often. That's what sucks about SOC ... you just don't know what will happen (although you certainly can make guesses based on the market ... your example certainly sounds like a possibility). Note, SOC isn't confined to broadcasts ... they could make HD-DVD players with SOC ... or D-VHS players (D-Theater?) ... Imagine buying a HD-DVD player with component and DVI ... of course all the first releases support both ... but then several HD-DVDs start coming out that are ONLY available via DVI ...


Downrezzing = Some content is shown (or even bought), and it is available at full resolution via certain outputs, and 'downrezzed' on others. Again specific examples are hard to come up with ... because it's all decided 'at some time in the future' when they broadcast conent ... or press a DVD ... etc.


As Kipp noted ... the FCC has been given a (rather strong) recomendation to prohibit SOC (at least for broadcasters ... cable/satelite). Of course, there are some parties asking the FCC not to prohibit it. And then there are parties saying 'either prohibit it, or make sure not to allow my competetors to do it but not me'. A rather fine mess ...


Unfortunately, I haven't seen any similar strong recomendations to prohibit downrezzing. Again, there are parties on both sides. The CE/MSO agreement ignored the subject (just saying that it needed to 'be decided') ... although I think there was something in there saying that OTA broadcasts should not be allowed to be downrezzed (sounds like the cable campanies trying to get content that the studios won't allow on network).
 
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