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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If there is any? I know it's heavier and it's deeper, but it ain't that bad.


Is there any real draw back, like darker picture, less color or stuff like that?


I'm looking at this unit for my living room which has a few window, brightness is extremly important for me, and the screen must not reflect light like a cheap plasma screen.


Will I be satisfied with this unit?


Thank you
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shingor6 /forum/post/15544660


If there is any? I know it's heavier and it's deeper, but it ain't that bad.


Is there any real draw back, like darker picture, less color or stuff like that?


I'm looking at this unit for my living room which has a few window, brightness is extremly important for me, and the screen must not reflect light like a cheap plasma screen.


Will I be satisfied with this unit?


Thank you

It isn't heavier.


No drawbacks at all really. Is it going to have a black level as black as a Pioneer Kuro? No it won't be, but nothing else really does. The black level is wonderful though. It is also plenty bright. It will burn your eyes right out of their sockets if you want it to. Most turn it down a bit.


It is better than any LCD in more ways than I can count. Perfect handling of motion would be one item though.
 

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You won't be able to tell all your friends that you got the most expensive set that money can buy.



On the other hand, you could credibly tell them that you got one of the greatest bargains ever available in home theatre.



Your call, dude.



PS--reflections are not bad thanks to the matte screen.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by moonhawk /forum/post/15546228


You won't be able to tell all your friends that you got the most expensive set that money can buy.



On the other hand, you could credibly tell them that you got one of the greatest bargains ever available in home theatre.



Your call, dude.


...

Now that's good.
 

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Viewing angles compared to plasma not LCD.

SSE

Not really a con, but less sharp than most flat panels.


Otherwise they are great displays and great bang for your buck.

You'll have to decide this though.
 

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The only real drawback of the LED DLP's is the viewing angle in my opinion, and it isn't something to dismiss. For me it is a complete deal breaker, and depending on your room design it could be as well.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shingor6 /forum/post/15552329


I went to the store to see a 72" and I really hated the view angle, are the LED unit any better?

Not really, but the simple solution is sit directly in front of the set and enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, the trouble is, I want a tv for when I'm cooking, doing exercise and stuff like that. When I want to watch a movie, I pull down the screen and start the projector.


So I guess it won't be a DLP.
 

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If you need off angle performance like no other you will need to bu ya kuro.

Due to its single sheet design it keeps almost completely uniform all the way to the point where you walk behind the panel.

But those are pricey.

Next best would be anyother plasma.

Then dlp's and lcd's.

*This is just for horizontal viewing.
 

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How bad is the picture change in viewing for veritcal angles? I have a front row couch that is pretty much straight on, and a rear row that's on a platform that's just over 1' in height.
 

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all pros and cons are relative to the perspective of the viewer/owner


viewing angle is the biggest possible con. LED more so than bulb.

RP sets can exhibit geometry issues (pincushion bowing is common)

Rainbow effect can be present (much less likely with LED).

Picture tends to be softer than plasma/lcd

Blacks not as good as the best plasmas, but better than LCD


I think that's about it.


There are some big pros to go along.
 

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No offense, but I doubt that the folks who say DLP's have a softer picture have spent much time with a properly calibrated LED DLP.
 

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Really it's just viewing angle and SSE.(with a minor in possible geometry concerns)

Color accuracy is fantastic, size per dollar is fantastic, blacks although said by some to be less than stellar are reportedly able to be made quite dark....well below .010
 

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One other thing to weigh in when considering a RPTV vs flat panel is that the optics and mirror will get somewhat dirty over time and will eventually need to be cleaned. Depending on how 'dirty' the air is in your house, they could need cleaning after 1 year, or might not need it for 5 years. The more you burn candles, fry food, broil steaks, blacken meat, pets, and many other things will contribute to indoor air pollution that will dirty the internals after a while. If you don't smoke cigarettes indoors, then you are eliminating the #1 cause for dirty optics.


Overall, I wouldn't be too worried about it. My A3000 SXRD still looks great after 1 year.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by billbillw /forum/post/15557020


One other thing to weigh in when considering a RPTV vs flat panel is that the optics and mirror will get somewhat dirty over time and will eventually need to be cleaned. Depending on how 'dirty' the air is in your house, they could need cleaning after 1 year, or might not need it for 5 years. The more you burn candles, fry food, broil steaks, blacken meat, pets, and many other things will contribute to indoor air pollution that will dirty the internals after a while. If you don't smoke cigarettes indoors, then you are eliminating the #1 cause for dirty optics.


Overall, I wouldn't be too worried about it. My A3000 SXRD still looks great after 1 year.

I know what you meant but I got a chuckle out of this part.
 

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You should see what the spider that lives inside of my Sammy does to the optics.
 

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Viewing Angle


Rear projection sets focus most of their light directly forward. This is necessary because all the light comes from a very compact light source but gets spread over a very large area. The more focused the light, the brighter the resulting image will be.


The downside is that this limits the practical viewing angle to about +/- 30 degrees vertically.


As you get outside of around +/- 10 degrees, the picture will decrease in brightness. This won't be that noticeable if you are sitting far from the set -- the entire screen will just be slightly less bright. However, if you are close to the screen, your eyes will be outside the +/- 10 degrees for some areas of the screen and inside for others. This will result in the top and/or bottom corners of the screen appearing noticeably darker than the center.


To ensure that your eyes are comfortably within +/- 10 degrees of every part of the screen, you need to sit at least 8-9 feet away from the screen (for a 61" television -- 9-10 feet for a 67").


If you'd like to sit closer than 8 feet and can't tolerate a variation in brightness across the screen -- or if you want to place the center of the screen much above or below eye level -- or if you want to walk around while you watch television, etc., then the viewing angle of a rear-projection may be a concern.


In general, plasmas have the best viewing angles are great for "party viewing", where lots of people will be watching from many different distances and angles.

Rainbow Effect


Most DLP rear projection sets don't display the red, green and blue channels simultaneously. Instead, they rapidly cycle through separate red, blue and green images on the screen. The cycling happens fast enough that your retina merges all three colors into a single color image.


However, when your eye darts quickly across the screen (e.g., to look at a different character in the scene), the red, green and blue images will be offset from each other on your retina. This produces a rainbow-like smearing of high-contrast objects in the scene. The effect is particularly noticeable with black and white scenes, where glimpses of color seem especially out of place.


Some people don't notice the rainbow effect at all. Others notice, but it doesn't bother them. I'm very sensitive to it, myself -- and it's the primary issue that's held me back from getting a DLP television in the past.


In most older sets, the color cycling is done using a spinning color wheel in front of a white lamp. To reduce the rainbow effect over the years, they've increased both the speed of the wheel and the number of color filters on it. (This makes the rainbows thinner and therefore less noticeable.)


As I understand it, the 750 series uses a different approach. These televisions rapidly cycle through a set of red, green and blue LEDs that make up the light source. LEDs can be cycled faster than a color wheel can spin, so the rainbow effect can be reduced even more.


[Side Note: If the fact that DLP televisions flash different colors in sequence bothers you, then you should do a bit more research into DLP. Even the "individual color images" are themselves comprised of hundreds of separate images displayed in extremely rapid succession. The DLP chip is a set of tiny mirrors than either reflect the full brightness of the light source or none at all. To achieve different levels of red, green and blue for each pixel, the DLP chip cycles these little mirrors on and off hundreds of times per image. If you had a very high-speed camera, you could see the individual pixels turning on and off, creating different dither-patterns across the entire screen. On very early Samsung DLPs, I saw dither patterns when I darted my eyes across the screen when look at fairly uniform fields of color (e.g., a view of the sky). I suspect these fleeting patterns were caused by the individual dither patterns overlapping across my retina to form constructive and destructive interference. Very few people were able to see the effect, so I was never able to confirm this was the cause.]

Bottom Line


I prefer the size of rear projection televisions. They are great for three or four viewers within the sweet-spot.


I prefer the viewing angle of plasmas. They are much better for large groups, people who like to move around a lot while they watch TV or rooms that require off-center seating.


I'm beginning to take LCD panels more seriously -- but I don't have enough experience with them to know their strengths over plasmas. Most LCDs have viewing angle limitations, but they probably aren't as restrictive as rear-projection units.
 
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