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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
What best viewing SDR blu ray in dark room

For very long time I'm concern to make the PQ of my TV look like eaxactly as Cinema and I always compare between both normal and latest Dolby Cinema and my TV LG OLED and I always find significant differences when I calibrate my TV to Gamma 2.2-2.4. Generally in Cinema the PQ look very precise, stronger, and relaxer to the eyes or none fatigue.

As far I know there is other type of gamma used for viewing movies such 2.6 or S-Curves or perhaps something else, so far I tried gamma 2.6 in my TV and showed very close to theater.

Now I understand it's possible not to achieve my goal because the original movies data shrink to blu ray, but I'm still keep wondering is how to achive Cinema PQ in my TV?

And as for white level (contrast), would setting it to 80 cd/m2 better for my purpose?

And thank you for answering.
 

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Reference environment for SDR Blu-ray is Gamma 2.4 with 100 nits and D65 bias light (5-10% from dislpay 100% white and behind the TV).
Between 2007-2013 most movies are mastered with Gamma 2.2, for this movies gamma 2.2 should look better.


Cinema movies are mastered different in the studios and they use gamma 2.6 with luminance in the range 40-80 nits.
 

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all blurays should be watched at gamma 2.4 and 100 nits (to be at reference), regardless of when released.
Most home viewing should be at 120-160 nits.
(BT1886 is okay if your display does not have good black levels).
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Reference environment for SDR Blu-ray is Gamma 2.4 with 100 nits and D65 bias light (
Between 2007-2013 most movies are mastered with Gamma 2.2, for this movies gamma 2.2 should look better.


Cinema movies are mastered different in the studios and they use gamma 2.6 with luminance in the range 40-80 nits.
Thank you all people for helpful reply. I forget mention my question relate watching movie at total dark room, Is 100 nits for total dark room like in theater or for general view with lights on?


Also I couldn't understand what is (5-10% from dislpay 100% white and behind the TV).
Thanks.
 

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Just to throw the cat amongst the pidgeons, Rec.709-6 recommends BT.1886 for viewing HD content on an HDTV....

From experience, peak white set to 100 nits on an OLED, will be too dim, even in a bat cave. My last OLED (an LG B6) was set for 140 nits and the current OLED (Panasonic GZ2000) is set at 145 nits but, I think it needs to go brighter still. I'll try 150 nits next.

Paul
 

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Also I couldn't understand what is (5-10% from dislpay 100% white and behind the TV).
Thanks.
I think it's referring to bias lightning, light behind the TV to reduce eye strain. The intensity of this bias lightning can be around 5% of the peak brightness of the display.
 

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I don’t have any white reflective behind TV but my side walls close to TV and highly reflective, the image very disturbing when TV view white image even at 80 nits in dark room.

I also found this link which is very helpful to set gamma and room environment:
https://app.spectracal.com/Documents/3_Gamma_2.0_2.2or2.4.pdf

I'm concern to treat these reflections.

Thanks.
Reflections can be treated with paint or fabric:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-d...1465053-blacker-theater-better-image-219.html
 
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