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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sooooo, I have a Peavey IPR2 7500 and I seem to be having an issue with the DDT (clipping) lights coming on prematurely.


So I decided to test out a woofer that my dad got. It's a B&W 15, with single a 4" VC at 4 ohms.

http://s681.photobucket.com/user/saabracer32/media/Mobile Uploads/image-5.jpg.html


So I had it hooked up to one channel of the amp with the amp gain all the way up. I have the sub out on the receiver at -7.5 going to a Samson S-Convert with the gain on that all the way up. I was getting the clipping lights and so I turned the sub out on the receiver up to 0 yet I would reach the same volume on the sub and get the clip lights. I tried messing with the gain on the amp and the s convert but nothing. The cabinet is 2.2 cubic feet. Here is a small video of the proceedure. I'm supposed to get 2400 watts into one channel at 4 ohms. If this is 2400 watts I'm in trouble.

http://s681.photobucket.com/user/saabracer32/media/Mobile%20Uploads/trimFB19CA82-AA5A-4406-A0A1-E98E756F9081.mp4.html


Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
If anyone has trouble with the video let me know. I had issues uploading it to YouTube so I was stuck with photobucket.

Dan


Oh one other thing I should mention. At the point of the amp clipping my bedroom lights are dimming pretty heavily. Not sure if that would be a cause of clipping or not. The amp will be getting a dedicated circuit in about a month or so.
 

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My guess would be voltage drop. The amp is probably not getting enough power from the outlet.

If your lights are dimming, I am surprised the breaker is not tripping.


You could verify the voltage drop/line sag by trying amp in another area of the house if that is possible.


Also, if you have a multimeter you could test the outlet to see if you are even getting close to 120v before and after having the amp run.
 

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It looks like to me that you could be using all the amplifier has, you are driving that woofer hard enough with those 40 to 60hz burps.


You might thermal that woofer before hitting xmech at those frequencies (especially on like dubstep etc), and/or if any deep bass does come along... you might bottom it out too.


That in combination with the voltage drop, would clip it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My wife has a bit of a headache so I'll wait until tomorrow to check my voltage with a multimeter.


I would love to get rid of the s convert as I'm a believe of having the least amount in the signal chain. Without it I get very little output.


I got the amp as I was told it would be a perfect match to four UM 18s. After this I'm afraid that it might not drive them all that much. Gorilla83 (I think that's his name) and a few others have said the 7500 was too much power for 4 of the Dayton HO 18s so I know it has the potential.


Man I'm really hoping it's the voltage of the outlet.


Dan
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by saabracer23  /t/1523970/what-can-i-change-to-get-full-power-out-of-my-amp#post_24520646


Sooooo, I have a Peavey IPR2 7500 and I seem to be having an issue with the DDT (clipping) lights coming on prematurely.
That's a common problem with Peavey DDT. I've seen many reports from users trying to set their output voltage limit and they can't get near to what the amp should be capable of delivering before the DDT engages. I haven't seen any cures.
 

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Keep in mind, as noted above, you're limited by your supply circuit. Assuming you're using a residential 120V receptacle.


15A: 120V * 15A * 0.9(efficiency) / 2(channels) = 810 W/ch

20A: 120V * 20A * 0.9 / 2 = 1080 W/ch

30A: 120V * 30A * 0.9 / 2 = 1620 W/ch


You cannot truly reach the potential of that amplifier until you use a 240V circuit. I'm not sure if the Peavey has a switchable input voltage. Also, I'm not sure of the units power supply design and if using only one channel would increase the output significantly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice  /t/1523970/what-can-i-change-to-get-full-power-out-of-my-amp#post_24521157


That's a common problem with Peavey DDT. I've seen many reports from users trying to set their output voltage limit and they can't get near to what the amp should be capable of delivering before the DDT engages. I haven't seen any cures.

Bummer, no way to disengage it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by whitey019  /t/1523970/what-can-i-change-to-get-full-power-out-of-my-amp#post_24521193


Keep in mind, as noted above, you're limited by your supply circuit. Assuming you're using a residential 120V receptacle.


15A: 120V * 15A * 0.9(efficiency) / 2(channels) = 810 W/ch

20A: 120V * 20A * 0.9 / 2 = 1080 W/ch

30A: 120V * 30A * 0.9 / 2 = 1620 W/ch


You cannot truly reach the potential of that amplifier until you use a 240V circuit. I'm not sure if the Peavey has a switchable input voltage. Also, I'm not sure of the units power supply design and if using only one channel would increase the output significantly.

There isn't a significant jump by using only one channel, only like 100-200 watts. I have no problem running 240 volts to run an amp, though I don't think the peavey will do it. I'll test my voltage and then run the amp on a dedicated 20 amp circuit. If that doesn't work then maybe I should sell it.


Any suggestions for a 240v amp that will put out rated power other than the sanway clone?


Dan
 

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Dan...something is off.

You have a few things to begin looking at....power supply at wall...wiring...AVR...faulty 7500...gain...etcetera.

First off, would like to see amp's performance on a dedicated 120V line.


Let's put it this way...I am in NY and have a dedicated 20 amp line for my amps.


Up to recently, I was running two Dayton 460HOs (4 ohm) in 4 cu ft sealed boxes, using forty-foot 12 gauge speaker wire runs...and wired the pair of subs in parallel to present a 2-ohm load to one amp channel of my Peavey IPR2 5000.

Then, I had my other pair of identical Dayton subs configured the same way and wired to the amp's second channel.

I had absolutely no problem driving amp with my Denon AVR and getting frickin' awesome bass at -10 volume during scenes from Master & Commander (ship/cannon battle) or WotW pod scene, amongst so many others...DDT lights flickered here and there at heaviest-demand scenes.


Of course, you are running a 7500, so my experience could not correlate 100% with your situation, but it comes close to what you should be able to do.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice  /t/1523970/what-can-i-change-to-get-full-power-out-of-my-amp#post_24521157


That's a common problem with Peavey DDT. I've seen many reports from users trying to set their output voltage limit and they can't get near to what the amp should be capable of delivering before the DDT engages. I haven't seen any cures.

Bill...all of these reports in the field?...or could you share a few public forums/threads where these many reports are referenced??

If in the field, do the many reports involve the DDT as it is implemented in the IPR2 series of Peavey amps?

Thanks in advance.
 

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I am currently driving 4 SI18D2's in stereo 2 ohm with my IPR7500 and have never seen the DDT lights come on yet. The drivers have to be nearing max excursion though. They move much more than when I was driving 4 of them with an old EP2500 that's for sure.


Simplify the circuit. Let your receiver drive the amp directly and verify the output voltage from the receiver. Set the level back to 0db at the sub output and depending on your receiver you should get at least 2V from the output when at 0db output. My Denon X4000 will put out nearly 8V at full tilt.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by whitey019  /t/1523970/what-can-i-change-to-get-full-power-out-of-my-amp#post_24521193


Keep in mind, as noted above, you're limited by your supply circuit. Assuming you're using a residential 120V receptacle.


15A: 120V * 15A * 0.9(efficiency) / 2(channels) = 810 W/ch

20A: 120V * 20A * 0.9 / 2 = 1080 W/ch

30A: 120V * 30A * 0.9 / 2 = 1620 W/ch


You cannot truly reach the potential of that amplifier until you use a 240V circuit. I'm not sure if the Peavey has a switchable input voltage. Also, I'm not sure of the units power supply design and if using only one channel would increase the output significantly.

The amp will draw more power when it needs it with regular program material. Even though the above numbers are correct, a 20 amp outlet will easily yield 100 amps for up to a second without tripping. So, for transients it should be drawing much more power than the nominal 1080w per channel.

Of course, that is predicated on the fact that there is power to be drawn. If there is line sag/voltage drop it will be much less.





Now for sine wave testing you will be limited by the breaker very quickly.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by blah450  /t/1523970/what-can-i-change-to-get-full-power-out-of-my-amp#post_24521932


Bill...all of these reports in the field?...or could you share a few public forums/threads where these many reports are referenced??

If in the field, do the many reports involve the DDT as it is implemented in the IPR2 series of Peavey amps?

Thanks in advance.
It's been reported on my forum, and it's not specific to this amp but to Peavey in general with DDT.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmst3  /t/1523970/what-can-i-change-to-get-full-power-out-of-my-amp#post_24520825


My guess would be voltage drop. The amp is probably not getting enough power from the outlet.

If your lights are dimming, I am surprised the breaker is not tripping.


You could verify the voltage drop/line sag by trying amp in another area of the house if that is possible.


Also, if you have a multimeter you could test the outlet to see if you are even getting close to 120v before and after having the amp run.

Question on how to test it. I presume you test the outlet first and see if you have 120v, then plug the amp in one of the 2 sockets and play something at the level that dims the lights and check the other socket to see if the voltage is dropping? Is this correct?


I am having the light dimming issue and it feels like the amp should be giving more as well. I am using an inuke3000.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cessna1466u  /t/1523970/what-can-i-change-to-get-full-power-out-of-my-amp#post_24523103


Question on how to test it. I presume you test the outlet first and see if you have 120v, then plug the amp in one of the 2 sockets and play something at the level that dims the lights and check the other socket to see if the voltage is dropping? Is this correct?


I am having the light dimming issue and it feels like the amp should be giving more as well. I am using an inuke3000.

Yes, that should work.


You can use a kill-a-watt as well, but they often don't have the ability to save the high and low points. So, if the voltage varies wildly it may not pick up data fast enough. Hopefully, you can find something that works for you.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cessna1466u  /t/1523970/what-can-i-change-to-get-full-power-out-of-my-amp#post_24523103


Question on how to test it. I presume you test the outlet first and see if you have 120v, then plug the amp in one of the 2 sockets and play something at the level that dims the lights and check the other socket to see if the voltage is dropping? Is this correct?


I am having the light dimming issue and it feels like the amp should be giving more as well. I am using an inuke3000.

That'll work, be careful.

Also, to make things easier, you can plug a short extension cord in to facilitate easier and more comfortable access to the circuit measurements.


A Kill-a-Watt brand meter is handy for such measurements, iirc, Frys and other places offer them. Of course a multimeter is fine, just exercise caution.
 

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Yes, first thing you have to do is get proper electrical service to the amp. Dimming lights is indicative of a circuit reaching it's capacity, especially on peak delivery.


Second, the gain of an amplifier is fixed, in case of the IPR2 7500, it is x40(32db). The attenuator controls(volume knobs) merely allow adjustment of the voltage of the incoming signal to allow full rated power delivery from the amp, and give you the best signal to noise ratio through the device.


I also trust you have the dip switches on the back set to either "full" or "subwoofer", otherwise you're not getting any low frequency content to the subs at all.


Best regards,


John
 
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