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I currently have a Marantz PM 7000N Amplifier along with Wharfedale Diamond 10.1 speakers. The amp is known to give a slightly forward sound which suppose to be a good combination with the warm sound the Wharfedale produces. However, there's some songs where the vocals sound pretty bright. The highs can definitely be toned down a bit. My speakers are a couple inches away from the wall. I cant really move them anywhere else since there is no other space. I'm about 10 feet away as far the listening distance. My setup sounds really good, its just that I come across some songs(modern songs) For Example, Funk or R&B where the highs can be uncomfortable and overpowering.
Is there a device like perhaps a Pre amp, DAC, or some type of Processor that can tone down some of those excessive highs? I would think a device that deals with room correction as well can help. What do you guys think?
 

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I currently have a Marantz PM 7000N Amplifier along with Wharfedale Diamond 10.1 speakers. The amp is known to give a slightly forward sound which suppose to be a good combination with the warm sound the Wharfedale produces. However, there's some songs where the vocals sound pretty bright. The highs can definitely be toned down a bit. My speakers are a couple inches away from the wall. I cant really move them anywhere else since there is no other space. I'm about 10 feet away as far the listening distance. My setup sounds really good, its just that I come across some songs(modern songs) For Example, Funk or R&B where the highs can be uncomfortable and overpowering.
Is there a device like perhaps a Pre amp, DAC, or some type of Processor that can tone down some of those excessive highs? I would think a device that deals with room correction as well can help. What do you guys think?

You are blaming your equipment when it is the program material that is too bright. :)
 
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What is your source ? Spotify and Pandora are convienient but MP3 sound at best thats magnified under certain volumes. I use Restorer on my Denon not sure if you have that feature.

Every room regardless how well it’s acoustically treated has a max volume. I’ve never read about this anywhere my guess is there’s no white paper on it, I have a difficult time quantifying the sound I’m hearing, but it seems to be a fact. When I say max volume, I just mean it’s a point where everything seems to fall apart, the way the image no longer floats in front of you, the way the bass guitar sounds like a bass guitar,And the point were vocals become very apparent that you are listening to a human voice through a speaker,It may very well be a decay issue with the sound is no longer decaying it’s remaining in the room which adds more volume and more distortion and creates an image it’s no longer clear
 

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I think even though you can't leave it that way, you should pull your speakers away from the wall and see what happens.

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You are blaming your equipment when it is the program material that is too bright. :)
I agree, if it is only on certain songs, then it is the songs and not your equipment.

I also agree that speaker location and acoustic treatments in the room can help. Is your room carpeted? If not, consider getting a throw rug to place on the floor between the speakers and you. Wall hangings and acoustic panels can be inexpensive and help a lot with reflections.
 

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Room correction will help a lot. A miniDSP DDRC 2x4 HD is a good cheap way to get Dirac

Do you have an overly reflective room? Maybe throw some blankets on the walls, floor and tables along with some pillows to see if that makes a difference. In which case you might need some room treatments. Try Gik Acoustics. They also have options that can blend in well with your home decor.

The problem could also be in other areas. How are your speakers coupled to the floor? Try some isolators from Herbies Audiolab (they have a great return policy) or some DriversTech EVA pads from supply house (super cheap)
 

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Yes, try adjusting the treble setting.

Also, if the loudspeakers are aimed directly at your ears, try pointing the speakers at different angles away from your seat, which may help.
 

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Every room regardless how well it’s acoustically treated has a max volume. I’ve never read about this anywhere my guess is there’s no white paper on it, I have a difficult time quantifying the sound I’m hearing, but it seems to be a fact. When I say max volume, I just mean it’s a point where everything seems to fall apart, the way the image no longer floats in front of you, the way the bass guitar sounds like a bass guitar,And the point were vocals become very apparent that you are listening to a human voice through a speaker,It may very well be a decay issue with the sound is no longer decaying it’s remaining in the room which adds more volume and more distortion and creates an image it’s no longer clear
I know exactly what you mean. It is what I call room distortion. The volume reaches a point where the room reflections become too audible and makes listening uncomfortable. I notice it most when dialogue and vocals become 'shouty'.
 

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I know exactly what you mean. It is what I call room distortion. The volume reaches a point where the room reflections become too audible and makes listening uncomfortable. I notice it most when dialogue and vocals become 'shouty'.
Would one be able to increase the inherent max room volume with treatments like absorbtion?

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Would one be able to increase the inherent max room volume with treatments like absorbtion?

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
Room treatment will help and the more a room is treated the louder you can go without it sounding louder. It is the distortion whether it is the room, equipment or source material that makes it uncomfortable.

Think of the speakers in an average TV. We have all been to a persons house who is hard of hearing and the TV is unbearably loud but it not as loud as it seems, it is the low quality amp, speakers and cabinet resonances that are causing distortion.

You can over treat a room and make it sound lifeless/dead.
 

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...room correction...
...is more about mathematically smoothening the bass from inevitable room mode resonances, which at the lowest frequencies are NOT affected by room treatment. However, in the case of Denon (and I think Marantz) processors which are new enough, the Audyssey App allows control over the "house curve" if this is a problem you have all the time. If it is just some songs, then use the treble control-unless the recording is just clipping (The Scorpions digital mastering of Love at First Sting); or way too bright (Carlene Carter's "I Fell In Love"). In those cases you are screwed. Or if this happens when you are playing really loud maybe you're just exceeding the 11.2s capabilities, either of the tweeter or maybe the woofers are moving too much and modulating the sound. Then you need a subwoofer if if IF your amp has a highpass filter; adding the sub will be useless without bass management to reduce the 11.2s excursions.
 
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