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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was messing with my 3060, and I popped the power supply :(

I think all I blew was the fuse and what appears to be a capacitor next to it. Can anyone tell me what the component is next to the fuse. Thanks.

And why is the heatsink live on this thing! Crazy. A guy could get hurt if he's poking around inside his Replay with the lid off and the power plugged in.

Maybe it's how they keep up the quality of the gene pool.
 

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Got a picture of what part you are asking about? I don't have a box open, but I could look if you show me what part exactly you want to know about.


Give me a C# or something that might lead me to the right part of the board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There is a 2 pin connector where the mains comes in - a black wire and a white wire. Immediately next to that is a fuse. Then the component in question. Then a resistor - looks like 10Megs. I want to know what the componenet inthe middle there is. I think it was a capacitor, but I need a value at least; preferably a type and a voltage.


Thanks,

Worried
 

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Can you take a digital picture and attach it to a post here? That's what Jeff was asking. Or, at least, if the board's not too toasted, it should say 'C13' or something where the cap used to be.


(Many consumer devices don't have a power interlock on the cover. My RTV has a 'Caution! High Voltage!' sign. What did you *think* it meant? :) )
 

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I don't want to be a skunk at your garden party but in my experience a combination of blown fuse and fried cap is usually the result of the failure of an active component, such as a regulator. Especially if there's a smoked resistor in the mix. Chances are that if you replace the fuse and capacitor only (or even the resistor, too), history may repeat itself. Or not. I guess there's not much to loose. Should be exciting.
 

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I believe Indy is referring to the attached component. I haven't figured out what it's called. It's located in series with the hot power wire with a 400K resister connecting the other lead to nuetral. Looks like a normally closed protection device. Probably designed to blow when excess voltage or current flows through the circuit. This functions opposite to a MOV metal oxide varistor.
 

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It could be a resettable fuse. I've seen a few in similar packages before on power supplies. Never had a problem with one though, nor am I an expert on finding the right value. Having a resetable fuse in series with another resistor makes more sense than a capacitor, but it's very hard to know without a schematic.


It's very doubtful that RTV even designed this power supply. Usually companies buy an off-the-shelf power supply that will fit their needs, so finding schematics and parts lists is tricky at best.
 

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it actually looks like a cap that is designed to blow to protect the rest of the hardware from power spikes (surges). They are common in cheap surge protectors, and offer little help ;-(
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by imax
it actually looks like a cap that is designed to blow to protect the rest of the hardware from power spikes (surges). They are common in cheap surge protectors, and offer little help ;-(
It isn't a MOV which short out at a preset voltage, typically 250 volts in an application like this. Nor is it a capacitor as it continuity tests closed. Capacitors are only capable of storing DC or phase shifting AC voltage. My guess is this component has circuit protection qualities similar but not exactly the same as a fuse.
 

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If it's in series with the power then it could be a thermal fuse (although I've never seen one in that form factor.)
 

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if it is in series, then it is probably a PT (Positive Temperature) thermister. This is a device that has a higher resistance when cold and its resistance goes down when it heats up. This is very commonly used at the input of switching power supplies. It limits the surge current when the unit is first plugged in and then the current flowing through it heats it up and it then allows more current to flow until the power output stabilizes. If it is broken, then it will be dificult to find an exact replacement but look up thermisters at the Digikey.com site. LOL.
 
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